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ANNUAL REPORT 
1990 

SWAMPSCOTT 
MASSACHUSETTS 



"Phillips High School" 
Courtesy of Historical Society 
SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

"Phillips" High School was built in 1894 and dedicated on 
November 24 of the same year to the Phillips Family who gave the 
land upon which the building was erected. The name was removed 
the third floor facade along with the tower in 1936 when the building 
was remodeled and it became "Swampscott High School" with the 
Phillips Auditorium added. 

A second addition was added to the building in 1966 and the 
lawn and flagpole were removed for additional parking. In 1977 
it became the "Greenwood Avenue" Junior High School when the 
junior high on Forest Avenue was enlarged to become the new 
"Swampscott High School". 

This year the Greenwood Avenue building became the as yet 
to be named "Swampscott Middle School". 

The cover photo was taken shortly after the building was 
completed. It is interesting to observe the lack of houses on Greenwood 
Avenue. The King Street extension, known as "T-Hill", had not been 
completed. The Civil War cannon on the grounds of the school was 
contributed to the war effort in 1917. 



Courtesy of the Swampscott Historical Commission 



One Hundred and Thirty-Ninth 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the Town Officers 

SWAMPSCOTT 

MASSACHUSETTS 



for the year ending December 31, 1990 



General Information 

I Swampscott was incorporated as a Town on May 21, 1852 
Situation: About 15 Miles northeast of Boston 

Population: State Census 1990, 13,650 Persons of all ages taken every 

year in Town Census 
Area: 3.05 square miles 
Assessed Valuation: $1,204,123,345 
Tax Rate: $12.49 Residential and Open Space 

$19.56 Commercial and Industrial 

S19.56 Personal 

Form of Government: Representative Town Meeting (Accepted May 

17, 1927. First meeting held February 27, 1928.) 
Governing Body of Town: Board of Selectmen 
Elihu Thompson Administration Building: 22 Monument Avenue 
Governor: William F. Weld 
Attorney General: L. Scott Harshbarger 
Secretary of the Commonwealth: Michael J. Connelly 
State Legislative Body: (Representing Swampscott) 
Senator Walter J. Boverini of Lynn (1st Essex District) 
Representative Douglas W. Petersen (8th Essex District) is the 
Representative in the General Court 
United States Congress: (Massachusetts Representatives) 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
Senator John F. Kerry 
Representative in Congress: Nicholas Mavroules 

(6th Congressional District) 
Member of Governor's Council: John F. Markey of North Andover 

(5th District) 

Qualifications of Voters: Must be 18 years of age, born in United 
States or fully naturalized in accordance with the provisions in Chapter 
587, Acts of 1972 and Chapter 853, Acts of 1973, there is no duration 
residential requirement for "who is a resident in the city or town where 
he claims the right to vote at the time he registers" may be registered. 

Registration: Monday through Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 12 Noon, 1:00 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. These hours are subject 
to change. Special sessions held preceding elections. 

Where to Vote: Precinct 1-Machon School on Burpee Road 

2- Clarke School on Norfolk Avenue side 
adjoining Abbott Park 

3- Central Fire Station, Burrill Street 

4- Hadley School on Redington Street 
5 & 6-High School on Forest Avenue 

Tax Bills: Tax bills for the Fiscal Year (July 1 through June 30) are 
due and Payable July 1. If one-half of the bill, plus betterments, is 
not paid by November 1, interest will be assessed from October 1. If 
the remaining one-half of the tax bill is not paid by May 1, interest 
will be assessed from April 1. 



3 



Town Officers — 1990 



Elected 

Moderator Charter Commission 

Martin C. Goldman (1990) William R. DiMento, 

Board of Selectmen Chairman (1991) 

Robert E. Perry, Robert E. Donelan (1991) 

Chairman (1991) Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. (1991) 

Daniel R. Santanello (1991) Brian J. Drummond (1991) 

James L. Rudolph (1991) Lawrence Greenbaum (1991) 

Chris Drucas (1991) Vera C. Harrington (1991) 

Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. (1991) Brian C. Murphy (1991) 

Town Clerk and Tax Collector Catherine L. Woods (1991) 

Jack L. Paster (1991) Board of Health 

Town Treasurer Eugene Nigrelli (1991) 

Jack L. Paster (1992) Ann Greenbaum (1993) 

Board of Assessors Peter Barker, M.D. (1991) 

Anthony Benevento, Constables 

Chairman (1991) William E. Eldridge (1992) 

Vera C. Harrington (1993) Paul Minsky (1992) 

Ernset Mazola (1992) Planning Board 

Board of Public Works Eugene Barden, 

David L. Phillips, Chairman (1993) 

Chairman (1993) Peter R. Beatrice, Jr. (1992) 

Daniel P. Kelly (1991) John V. Phelan, HI (1995) 

Kevin G. Gookin (1992) Veeder C. Nellis (1991) 

School Committee Brian T. Watson (1994) 

Sandra Rotner, Swampscott Housing 

Chairman (1992) Authority 

Richard R. Feinberg (1993) Michael Palleschi, 

Robert L. Ingram (1993) Chairman (1994) 

Mary Lou B. Sherr (1992) Barbara F. Eldridge (1995) 

Kevin Breen (1991) Albert DiLisio (1991) 

Trustees of Public Library John F. O'Hare, 

Carole B. Schutzer (1991) State Appointee (1991) 

Paul C. Wermuth (1992) Commissioners of Trust Funds 

Thomas J. Cezarz (1993) Louis A. Gallo (1993) 

Edward Krippendorf (1991) 

Carl D. Reardon (1992) 



4 



Appointed by Selectmen 



Town Accountant 
Keith A. Callahan 

Administrative Assistant 
Patricia E. George 

Animal Control Officer 
James S. Stone, Sr. (1991) 

Bargaining Agent 
Neil Rossman, Esquire (1991) 
Inspector of Buildings 
and Inspector of Smoke 
Louis Gallo (1991) 
Alternate Inspector of 
Buildings 
Kathleen Magee (1991) 
Richard T. Mcintosh (1991) 

Civil Defense Director 
Richard E. Maitland (1991) 



Affirmative Action 
Committee 

Arthur J. Palleschi (1991) 

Keith A. Callahan (1991) 

Council on Aging 

Alice Winston, Chairman (1992) 

Lorraine Pelletier (1992) 

Ruth Roche (1992) 

Martin Plum (1993) 

Roberta Kaloust (1991) 

Vincent P. O'Brien (1992) 

James T. Kapoll (1993) 

Renee Plum (1993) 
Ambulance Oversight 
Committee 



Kevin F. Breen, 




Secretary- 


(1991) 


Jeanne Butler 


(1991) 


Martin S. Plum 


(1991) 


Howard E. Rotner, M.D. 


(1991) 


Christine M. Wilson 


(1991) 


Richard Wilson 


(1991) 



Constable to Post Warrants 
and Other Similar Work 

William Eldridge (1991) 
Constable for Serving Civil Process 
Junior Clark (1992) 
David H. Janes (1992) 
Joseph H. Kukas (1992) 
Edward F. Riccio (1992) 
Tow^n Counsel — Workmen's 

Compensation Agent 
Arthur J, Palleschi, Esquire 

Senior Building Custodian 
Edward F. Riccio 

Fence View^ers 



Robert E. Perry (1991) 
Louis Gallo (1991) 
Alan F. Taubert (1991) 



Zoning Board of Appeals 

Ann M. Whittemore, 

Chairman (1992) 
Charles H. Hall (1993) 
Charles E. Morrison (1994) 
William L. O'Brien (1995) 
Kenneth B. Schutzer (1991) 

Associate Members 
Anthony Pasciuto (1991) 
Peter Shribman (1992) 



Regionalization Committee 

Selectman Chris Drucas 

(Swampscott) 
Selectman James L. Rudolph 

(Swampscott) 
Brian C. Murphy (Swampscott 

Finance Committee) 
Keith A. Callahan (Swampscott 

Town Accountant), Ex Officio 
Selectman George Alsberg 

(Marblehead) 
Selectman Thomas A. Alsberg 

(Marblehead) 



Committees Appointed by Selectmen 



5 



William Purdin (Marblehead 

Finance Committee) 
George B. Snow (Marblehead 

Town Accountant), Ex Officio 
Arts Council 
Cindy Madfis Blonder, 



Chairperson (1991) 

Anna Irvine (1992) 

Esther Mulroy (1992) 

Pamela J. Riffin (1991) 

Agnes Raymond (1992) 

Whitney L. White (1992) 

Alice Jane Winston (1992) 



Bikeway Committee 

Mary Powers, Chairman (1991) 
Building Code Board 
of Appeals 
Richard T. Mcintosh, 

Chairman (1994) 
Richard P. Mayor (1994) 
Richard N. Pierro (1993) 

Cable Advisory Committee 
Charles R. Borgioli 

Chairman (1991) 
Louise LaConte (1991) 
Bruce Gordon (1991) 
Ken Mass (1991) 
Gary G. Young, Ph.D. (1991) 
Paula R. Mariano (1991) 

Conservation Commission 
Lawrence F. Picariello, 

Chairman (1992) 
David DiLisio (1992) 
Harold J. Keating, III (1993) 
Dr. Richard P. Mayor (1991) 
David M. McCarthy (1992) 

Design Selection Committee 
Thomas Kiley, Chairman (1991) 
Dino Stati (1991) 



Board of Election 
Commissioners 

Francis Mancini, 

Chairman (1994) 
Marguerite A. Cunningham (1993) 
Timothy Davern (1992) 
Theodore Patrikis (1992) 

Fourth of July Committee 
Dr. Andrew M. Hansen (1991) 
Harbor Advisory Committee 



Joseph Monahan, 

Chairman (1991) 

Lawrence P. Bithell (1991) 

Arthur B. Freedman (1991) 

Robert V. Grimes (1991) 

William W. Guay (1991) 

William W. Hennessey (1991) 

Kent F. Murphy (1991) 

John J. O'Shea (1991) 

Louis D. Williams (1991) 

Historical Commission 

Louis A. Gallo, Chairman (1993) 

Sylvia B. Belkin (1991) 

David Callahan (1992) 

Douglas Maitland (1993) 

Marilyn Margulius (1992) 

Donald J. Warnock (1991) 



Nancy Cropley-Backstrom (1993) 
Committee to Study Installation 

of Automatic Sprinklers in 
New Residential Construction 



Kathleen J. Magee (1991) 

Peter Shribman (1991) 
Insurance Advisory 
Committee 
Paul R. Nestor, Jr., 

Chairman (1991) 

Robert E. Perry (1991) 

Charles E. Thornton (1991) 



6 



JFK Memorial Statue Fund 
Committee 

William R. DiMento, Chairman 
Memorial Day Committee 
Charles Popp, Jr., 

Chairman (1991) 
William McDermott (1991) 
Henry Fitzhenry (1991) 

Recreation Commission 
Precinct 

3 Andrew B, Holmes, 
Chairman (1993) 

1 Richard Dedrick (1993) 

2 John L. Romano (1993) 

4 Sherman Freedman (1991) 

5 Marie J. Clarke (1991) 

6 Sylvia Stamell (1992) 
John Hughes, Jr., 
Member-at-Large (1992) 

Safety/Security Committee 
Jacqueline Blanchard (1991) 
Chief William R. Hyde (1991) 
Paul R. Nestor, Jr. (1991) 
Chief John E. Toomey (1991) 
Alan F. Taubert (1991) 



Traffic Study Committee 

William McCarty, Chairman (1991) 
Louise LaConte (1991) 
Michael A. Palleschi (1991) 
Officer George Gately, 
Ex Officio (1991) 
Veterans Day Committee 
Charles Popp, Jr., Chairman (1991) 
James S. Fenelon (1991) 
Fred P. Fried (1991) 
Gerald D. Spencer, Jr. (1991) 
Vietnam Memorial Committee 
Robert E. Perry, Chairman (1992) 
Joseph J. Balsama (1992) 
Phillip A. Brine, Jr. (1992) 
Mary W. Cooper (1993) 
David Sherman (1991) 
Angelo Losano (1993) 
Thomas B. White, Jr. (1992) 

Associate Trustees 
Paul E. Garland (1992) 
Keith L. Jordan (1992) 
James H. Lilly (1992) 
Daniel R. Santanello (1992) 
Charles Popp, Jr., Ex Officio (1992) 



Representatives, Liaisons, Designees, 
Coordinators 



Clean Air Coordinator 
Oil Spill Coordinator 
Kent F. Murphy 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator 
Kent F. Murphy 
Mark Thompson 

Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority 
Board 
Richard Patoski 
Robert E. Perry 
Carl D. Rear don 

Right-To-Know Law 
Coordinator 
Kent F. Murphy 



Labor Service Coordinator 
Keith A. Callahan 
Essex County Advisory Board 
Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 

Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority 
Alan F. Taubert 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council 
Robert E. Perry 

National Organization on 
Disability Liason 
Carl D. Reardon 
Winter Planning Coordinator 
Robert E. Perry 



7 



Appointed by the Moderator 



Capital Improvements Study 
Committee 

Richard H. Salter, Chairman 

Bette Anne Babcock 

Patrick D. Hughes 

Atty. Steven Levine, At Large 

Gerard D. Perry 

Carl D. Reardon, Ex Officio 

Ralph Souppa 

Finance Committee 
Janet Baker, Chairman (1991) 
Brian C. Murphy (1993) 

Precinct 1 
Walter E. Newhall, Jr. (1993) 

Precinct 2 
Louis Conrad (1993) 

Precinct 3 
Richard Salter (1992) 

Precinct 5 
Irvin F. Cohen (1992) 

Precinct 6 
Steven Levine,At Large (1991) 
Marcus Buckley, 

At Large (1992) 
Janet Heestand, Secretary 



Town Land Committee 

J. Christopher Callahan 
Matthew Leahy 
Marianne McGrath 
Rhonda Tarmy 
Sharon Weaver 

Richard Salter, At Large (1992) 
Brian C. Murphy (1993) 
Steven Irvine (1991) 
Committee to Study Repairs 
at the Phillips Beach 
Fire Station 
Louis Frisch 
Fred Ribicandria 
Dr. Arthur Schwartz 
Fred Speranza 
Alan Kline, Ex Officio 

Sawtelle Property and 
Phillips Park Complex 
Study Committee 
Donald Babcock, Chairman 
Richard G. Baker 
Peter R. Beatrice, III 
Arthur Goldberg 
Andrew B. Holmes 



Appointed by Selectmen and Moderator 

Personnel Board 

Paul E. Garland, Chairman (1991) 

Ann M. Whittemore, Clerk (1992) 

Richard C, Bane (1993) 

Peter C. McCarriston (1992) 

Keith A. Callahan, Employees' Representative (1991) 

Appointed by the Mass. Emergency 
Response Commission 

Emergency Planning Committee 

Robert E. Perry, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
John E. Toomey, Chief, Police Department 
William R. Hyde, Fire Department 

Lawrence F. Picariello, Chairman, Conservation Commission 

Richard E. Maitland, Civil Defense Director 

Kent F. Murphy, Health Officer 

Alan R. Taubert, Superintendent, Public Works 



8 



Appointed by Probate Court 



Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship Committee 

Reverend John A. Barrett 

Dr. Robert Bessom 

Dr. Richard K. Chrystal 

Appointed by Board of Health 

Health Officer: Kent F. Murphy 

Appointed by Inspector of Buildings 

Gas & Plumbing Inspector: Peter McCarriston 
Assistant Inspector: Richard A. Mclntire 

Appointed by Board of Public Works 

Superintendent of Public Works and Town Engineer: 
Alan F. Taubert, P.E., P.L.S. 

Appointed by Contributory Retirement Board 
and Elected by Town Employees 

Contributory Retirement Board: 

Edward F. Riccio, Chairman, Elected by Employees 

Thomas F. Maloney, Appointed by Retirement Board (1992) 

Keith A. Callahan, Secretary, Ex Officio Member (1992) 

Appointed by Town Treasurer with Approval 
of Board of Selectmen 

Assistant Treasurer: Barbara Bickford 

Appointed by Town Clerk and Collector 

Assistant Town Clerk: Catherine L. Woods 
To receive Notice of Intention of Marriage and to administer The 
Oath of Office to persons appointed or elected to boards, committees 
or commissions within the Town of Swampscott. 



9 



Appointed or Elected by Organizations 
of the Employees Affected 

Group Insurance Advisory Committee 
Lt. Paul Sherry, Police Dept. Representative 
Tinothy Sweeney, Fire Dept. Representative 
Louis A. Gallo, Library Representative 
Judith Kenney, School Representative 
Barbara Bickford, Town Hall Representative 

Carl D. Reardon, Dept. of Public Works and Custodians Representative 

Subcommittee Appointed by the School 
Committee to Study the Renovation of 
Blocksidge Park Field House 

Thomas Belhumeur Paul Gorman 

John Burke William Hennessey 

Daniel Cahill Daniel Kelly 

Martha Cray Kathleen Magee 

Richard Feinberg John Phelan 



Union Presidents 



Police Department — Joseph Cordes 

Fire Department — John Chaisson 

Library — Susan Zbinden & Shirley Gould 

Teachers — Judith Kenney (at Hadley School) 

School Custodians and Cafeteria Workers — Carl Reardon 

School Secretaries — Betty Lou Popp (at Stanley School) 

Public Works Carl Reardon (at High School) 

Town Hall Clerical — Carl Reardon 



Committee Appointed by the Board of Health 
to Study Recycling 

Mescal Evler Kevin Gookin 

Sara Ingalls Nelson Kessler 

Alice Winston Barbara Schaefer 

Daniel Santanello, Liason, Board of Selectmen 
Eugene Nigrelli, Ex Officio, Chairman, Board of Health 
Kent Murphy, Ex Officio, Health Officer 



10 



Democratic Town Committee 



Name 

Alexander, Lawrence (A) 

Baboock, Elizabeth 

Baker, Edythe C. 

Baker Robert Allan 

Blonder, Jeffrey 

Borten, Katherine (A) 

Callahan, J. Christopher 

Cunningham, Marguerite 

Dembowski, Henry S. 

DiGiulio, Margaret, Clerk 

DiMento, William R. 

DiPesa, Ralph (A) 

Doyle, James T. 

Driscoll, Thomas H., Jr. 

Emspak, Frank 

Greenbaum, Lawrence 

Katz, Erica 

Kearney, Sheila 

Kenney, Judith 

Kyriakakis, Carole 

LaPeer, Susan 

Murphy, Kent, Vice-Chairman 

Murphy, Brian 

Nelson, Teresa 

Patrikis, Theodore A. 

Reichlin, Abbott 

Rosenthal, Burt (A) 

Segal, Maddy (A) 

Shanahan, William E. 

Sherr, Mary Lou 

Small, Elliot 

Small, Margaret 

Somer,Chairman 
Smith, James 
Smullin, Alix, Treasurer 
Valleriani, Catherine (A) 
Vatcher, Howard (A) 
Vatcher, Teresa J. (A) 
Watson, Brian 
Weiss, Gerdy 
Wood, Richard L. 

A — Associate Members 



Address 

State House, Room 504, Boston 
33 Manton Road 
75 Stanley Road 
75 Stanley Road 
15 Shackle Way 

9 Clarke Road 
44 Glen Road 

68 Foster Road 

42 Beach Bluff Avenue 
67 Walker Road 

64 Bay View Drive 
67 Aspen Road 

10 Arbutus Road 
82 Farragut Road 
33 Outlook Road 

21 Beach Avenue 
33 Gale Road 

14 Shackel Way 

9 Banks Circle 

90 Mountwood Road 

24 Lincoln Circle 

40 Glen Road 

92 Melvin Avenue 

36 Paradise Road 

1000 Paradise Road, Bldg. 2J 

8 Sumner Road 

69 Ocean View Road 
8 Sumner Road 

48 King Street 
39 Blaney Street 
32 Bay View Avenue 

32 Bay View Avenue 
38 Outlook Road 

22 Woodbine Avenue 
515 Humphrey Street 

65 Pleasant Street 
65 Pleasant Street 

50 Greenwood Avenue 
101 Bay View Avenue 
31 Cedar Hill Terrace 



11 



Elected Republican Town Committee 



Bullwinkle, Gary 
Butters, Joy 
Clain, Mary 
Cross, David 
Davern, Timothy J. 
Dudley, Ruby 
Fried, Fred 
Green wald, Ronald 
Jacobs, Leonard 
Mancini, Francis 
McGrath, Kevin 
McGrath, Marianne 
Nigrelli, Eugene 
O'Brien, Vincent P. 
Palleschi, Arthur J. 
Palleschi, Brenda 
Palleschi, Edward 
Parker, Alvah 
Perry, Frank H. 
Perry, Frank H. Jr. 
Perry, Marilyn A. 
Perry, Robert E., Chairman 
Stanton, Harriet 
Warnock, Donald 
Whittemore, Ann 
York, Francis 



1990 

9 Claremont Terrace 
53 Pleasant Street 
62 Thomas Road 
24 Ingalls Terrace 
38 Manton Road 
30 Blaney Street 
27 Eureka Avenue 
8 Captain Way 
400 Paradise Road 
159 Aspen Road 
849 Humphrey Street 
258 Essex Street 
21 MacArthur Circle 
139 Keningston Lane 
3 Bradlee Avenue 
3 Bradlee Avenue 
3 Bradlee Avenue 
3 Deer Cove Road 
319 Paradise Road 
71 Roy Street 
6 MacArthur Circle 
6 MacArthur Circle 
86 Paradise Road 
32 Berkshire Street 
36 Puritan Park 
24 Laurel Road 



12 



Board of Selectmen 



Robert E. Perry, Chairman 
Daniel R. Santanello 
Chris Drucas 
James L. Rudolph 
Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 

In 1990, one new member was elected to the Board of Selectmen. 
Chris Drucas joined the four re-elected members of the Board. Robert 
E. Perry was Chairman of the Board once again in 1990. 

Union Negotiations — The Board reached one year contract 
settlements with Town employees. 

Fiscal Management Review — The Massachusetts Department 
of Revenue, Division of Local Services, at the request of the Board, 
conducted a fiscal management review of the Town and offered long- 
range financial planning and forecasting. A report of their findings 
presented to the Board included suggestions and recommendations 
for more economical and efficient handling of Town business. 

Regionalization — A joint Regionalization Committee with 
Marblehead was formed to investigate the possibility of regionalization. 
Discussions with Department Heads in both Marblehead and 
Swampscott lead to the realization that the two communities were 
in many ways already regionalized. The Committee feels there is room 
for further investigation of this concept. 

Charter Commission — The voters of Swampscott elected a 
Charter Commission to study the structure of Town government. The 
Commission recommended two plans referred to in the Commission's 
final report as Plan A and Plan B. In Plan A, a Town Administrator 
is suggested along with several other significant revisions. In Plan 
B, an Executive Secretary is recommended along with several other 
significant revisions. 

Department Heads Committee — A Department Heads 
Committee was formed to provide a forum for heads of all Town 
Departments to discuss areas of common interest. 

Proposition 2^ Override — The uncertainty of whether or not 
the Town would receive its local aid distribution resulted in an override 
of Proposition 2)^ in a special election held in June. 



13 



Special Town Meeting — A Special Town Meeting was held 
on November 13, 1990. The purpose of this meeting was to address 
several issues of importance relative to the fiscal affairs of the Town. 

Administrative Assistant — The Board appointed a new 
administrative assistant in September of 1990. Patricia E. George 
commenced her duties in that capacity on October 1, 1990. 

The Board wishes to thank Sister Josette Parisi for her years 
of dedicated service and to extend to Sister their warmest best wishes 
for all her future endeavors. 

Appreciation — It is an honor to serve the Town as an elected 
official providing each member of the Board of Selectmen an 
opportunity to work in conjunction with all other boards, committees, 
commissions and elected officials discovering that the best interests 
of the Town and its residents is our common goal. The Board 
appreciates the cooperation and commitment to this common goal 
displayed all year by the members of those boards, committees, 
commissions, and elected officials. 



14 



Clerk of Swampscott 

Jack L. Paster 

A community's annual report is an important historical document 
and its pages should provide a realistic overview of the year just past. 
All elected officials have a responsibility, in my opinion, to call attention 
to those activities during the year which are meritorious of applause. 
There is also an obligation, however, to point out activities which are 
not so auspicious. 

The most sacred right you, as an American citizen, have is your 
right to vote. Since 1852 residents of the Town of Swampscott have 
gone to the polls to cast their ballots for the individuals they believed 
would best carry out the day-to-day operation of municipal government. 

Your rights to elect the key officials of your community are about 
to be swept out from under you by members of the Charter Commission, 
some of whom are proposing that the officers of Swampscott be 
appointed rather than elected by the community. 

The actions of the Charter Commission in this regard are most 
dangerous and while I won't use this space to offer my opinions as 
to why certain members have taken this approach, I must state most 
emphatically that the main reason why your Clerk, Collector and 
Treasurer is EFFECTIVE is because he is ELECTED and answerable 
directly to the townspeople of Swampscott rather than appointed and 
answerable to politicians or political appointees. 

An ELECTED official can carry out his duties and responsibilities 
without regard to political pressure. An appointed officer must always 
look over his shoulder and bow to political pressure to insure his 
reappointment. 

Enough said. 

Resignations 

State Law (Chapter 41 Section 109) mandates that a resignation 
of any elected or appointed officer of a town is not effective unless 
a letter of resignation is sent or delivered to the Town Clerk. 
Correspondence to any other office, board or official is not acceptable 
under the statute. Only the Town Clerk is empowered by law to accept, 
process and act on resignations. 



15 



When your Town Clerk receives a resignation from a town officer, 
he records the document and notifies the appointing authority or the 
Election Commission in the case of an elected official citing how the 
vacany can be filled and for how long. This effort insures that all 
boards, committiees, commissions and positions are kept at full 
strength at all times to best serve the public. 

It should also be noted, since the situation came up this year, 
that once a resignation is sent or delivered to the Town Clerk it cannot 
be taken back or rescinded according to the same section of law. 

Resignations received and processed during 1990 included: 

Douglas F. Allen, Charter Commission; Susan Burke, Capital 
Improvements Committee; Henry S. Dembrowski, School Committee; 
Francis A. Dube, Dog Officer; Dr. Theodore A. Dushan, Board of 
Health; Sarah P. Ingalls, Conservation Commission; Dr. Steven H. 
Lefkowitz, Board of Health; Claudia Luck, Recycling Committee; 
Arline Maguire, Constable to Post Warrants and Other Simialr Work; 
Gerard D. Perry, Finance Committee; Martin S. Plum, Council on 
Aging; Pamela Riffin, Swampscott Arts Council; John A. Telford, Dog 
Officer; and Howard M. Vatcher, Finance Committee. 



16 



Official Town Statistics — 1990 



Marriage Intentions Filed/Marriage Licenses Issued 133 

Marriages Recorded 132 

Births Recorded (62, Female; 71, Male) 133 

Deaths Recorded (76 Female; 78 Male) 154 

Applications for Variances and Special Permits 55 

Environmental Impact Statements Accepted 1 

Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act: 

Con. Comm. Notices of Intent Processed 1 

Resignations of Town Officials Accepted/Processed 14 

Applications for Planning Board Action Processed 3 

Site Plan Review Applications Processed 11 

Public Meeting Notices Recorded and Posted 558 

Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Filings Processed 103 

Certificates of Business (DBA) Issued and Processed 126 

Gas Storage (Flammables) Renewal Permits Issued 15 

Certificates of Municipal Lien Prepared and Issued 453 

Dog Licences Issued 862 

Dog Fines Collected $1,050.00 

Hunting/Fishing/Sporting/Trapping Licenses Issued 209 

Waterfowl Stamps Issued 41 



Archery/Primitive Firearms Deer Season Stamps Issued ... 28 

NOTE: Since Swampscott births occur in out-of-town hospitals, 
the reports of said births, as contained in the above statistical report, 
must first be processed by the City Clerk in the communities where 
birth actually took place before it is filed here in the parents' home 
community. There is often a lag of one, two or even three months 
before the official report arrives at Town Hall. In preparing our year- 
end report we use a cut-off date of January 20. Births occuring after 
that date are not included in the above statistics. In an attempt to 
minimize any possible confusion and to allow this report to serve as 
a historically correct document, we will publish updated totals in each 
year's report for the preceding year for the births and deaths. 

1989 Final Statistics: Births — 138; Deaths — 144. 



17 



1990 Annual Town Meeting 



Return of Service 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified 
the inhabitants of the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections 
and town affairs by posting an attested copy therof at the Town 
Administration Building, at the Post Office, and in at least two public 
and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town and at or in 
the immediate vicinty of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting 
was done April 17, 1990, and not less than seven (7) days before the 
date appointed for said meeting. 

Arline Maguire 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of the Warrants and Annual Reports: 

The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to the 
Town Meeting members and to those residents who were running 
for a Town Meeting seat (listed on the ballot) on April 13, 1990. Copies 
of the 1989 Annual Report were mailed in the same package. Copies 
of the Annual Report and the Warrant were available free of charge 
to any interested citizen in the Town Clerk's Office at the Town 
Administraion Building. 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The Annual Town Meeting of 1990 will convene on Tuesday, April 
24, 1990 with Article 1 (the Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's 
regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m. the Town Meeting will be adjourned 
until April 30, 1990, 7:45 p.m., at the Swampscott Junior High School. 

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Monday, April 30, 1990, 7:45 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2 
of the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott, that the Adjourned Annual 
Town Meeting will be held on Monday, April 30, 1990, beginning 
at 7:45 p.m., in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior High School 
on Greenwood Avenue. 



18 



The required identification badges are to be picked up at the 
auditorium after you have checked in. 

Meeting Certification: 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the 
Annual Town Mrrting of April 24, 1990, the Adjourned Town Meeting 
of April 30, 1990 was held at the Swampscott Junior High School 
auditorium and was called to order at 7:53 p.m. with the necessary 
quorum being present (275). At 10:39 p.m., it was voted to adjourn 
to May 1, 1990. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of April 
30, 1990, the Adjourned Town Meeting of May 1, 1990 was held at 
the Swampscott Junior High School auditorium and was called to 
order at 7:52 p.m. with the necessary quorum being present (194). 
It was voted at 10:27 p.m. to adjourn to May 2, 1990. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 
1, 1990, the Adjourned Town Meeting of May 2, 1990 was held at 
the Swampscott Junior High School auditorium and was called to 
order at 7:54 p.m. with the necessary quorum being present (168). 
It was voted at 10:38 p.m. to adjourn to May 8, 1990. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 

7, 1990, the Adjourned Town Meeting of May 8, 1990 was held at 
the Swampscott Junior High School auditorium and was called to 
order at 7:57 p.m. with the necessary quorum being present (176). 
It was voted at 10:45 p.m. to adjourn to May 9, 1990. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 

8, 1990, the Adjourned Town Meeting of May 9, 1990 was held at 
the Swampscott Junior High School auditorium and was called to 
order at 7:58 p.m. with the necessary quorum being present (175). 
It was voted at 10:04 p.m. to dissolve the 1990 Annual Town Meeting. 

Attest: Jack L. Paster, Town Clerk 

Legal Advertisements Published: 

In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott the 
following legal advertisements were published as indicated concerning 
the adjourned sessions of Town Meeting: 



19 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Office of the Town Clerk 

Notice is hereby given in accorclance with Article II, Section 2 
of the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual 
Town Meeting of 1990 will be held on Monday, April 30, 1990 beginning 
at 7:45 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior High School 
on Greenwood Avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, Esq., moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

Reporter 4/26/90 

TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Office of the Town Clerk 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2 
of the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual 
Town Meeting of 1990 will be reconvene on Monday, May 7, 1990 
beginning at 7:45 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior 
High School on Greenwood Avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, Esq., moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

Reporter 5/3/90 
Attendance: 

For the 1990 Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list 
at the end of this report as compiled by the volunteer door checkers 
who are students in the government classes at Swampscott High School. 

Town Meeting Action 

The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster 
who then administered the Oath of Office to the Town Meeting 
members. 

Monsignor John P. Carroll of St. John the Evangelist Church, 
Swampscott, offered the invocation. Moderator Goldman presented 
a plaque to Monsignor Carroll in recognition of his many years of 
service to the community. 



20 



Moderator Goldman introduced former Moderator Douglas F. 
Allen who offered remarks in memory of a long-time Finance 
Committee member and secretary Robert L. McVie who died April 
29, 1990. 

Mr. Allen's comments follow: 

Mr. Moderator: 

Town Meeting members and fellow townspeople: 

There is no doubt that our Town Meeting is the vital ingredient 
in the governance of the Town of Swampscott, establishing both our 
by-laws and the appropriations necessary to maintain the quality of 
life that we desire. To accomplish these goals, the spark of leadership 
is needed, and tonight we pay our respects to that individual who 
for so many years personified that leadership— Bob McVie. 

Bob first was elected to Town Meeting in 1965 representing 
Precinct Five, and was appointed to the Finance Committee by 
Moderator Dick Johnson in 1968. His fellow committee members 
elected him Chairman in 1969, and he served in that office until 1973. 
To support the activities of the Finance Committee, Bob continued 
as a member until 1978. With his retirement from the John Hancock, 
and the availability of more time, he was elected Secretary of the 
Finance Committee in 1979— and has continued in that capacity until 
now. Twenty-two years of service to the Town Meeting and the Town 
certainly establishes a record for dedication to us all! 

While it is unnecessary for me to recall with you Bob's ways and 
comments— you all must have ones that come to mind— let me share 
with you a few of mine. True to his Scottish heritage, Bob was frugal 
with our money, treating it as his own. And yet, I cannot recall a 
time when he was not a fighter for those funds that he viewed as 
necessary. The master of words, with an ever present sense of wry 
humor, how many times when the meeting became mired in the 
confusion of ideas, Bob was the one who summed up the issues clearly 
and persuasively, so that we all could see the way to a decision. With 
his experience at Town Meeting and knowledge of Town Meeting 
procedures, he used the parliamentary process to accomplish his goals. 

Service on the Swampscott Finance Committee requires countless 
hours of dedication, especially in the role of Chairman or Secretary. 
The recommendations that must be made need a thorough 
understanding of the issues and their relationship to other demands, 



21 



not always the most popular— and yet the job must be done. The advent 
of Proposition 2^2 has not only dramatically increased the importance 
of the Finance Committee, but also magnified the difficulties of its 
work. Such leadership as Bob demonstrated is not an attempt to win 
a popularity contest, but an attempt to insure that the best results 
are produced for the benefit of the community. When a community 
leader retires, it is customary to offer our thanks. Bob was not able 
to bask in the glow of congratulations; however, devoting time 
yesterday at the Town Hall preparing to continue his service at tonight's 
Town Meeting. 

Mr. Moderator, it is a sad duty that brings me back to Town 
Meeting this evening. 

Tonight I wish to pay belated thanks to Bob McVie for so 
unselfishly sharing with us his outstanding ability and dedication over 
his many years in Town Meeting. 

Bob, I, and all your friends shall miss you. The Town has suffered 
a deep loss. 

Town Meeting members recognized retiring State Representative 
Lawrence Alexander who was in attendance at the first and other 
sessions. 

On May 1, 1990, the Town Meeting took a Sense of the Meeting 
vote, "simply for procedure," that the members were supportive of 
an override of Proposition 2;^. The vote was declared "a clear majority." 

On May 1, 1990, the Town Meeting took a Sense of the Meeting 
vote to procede with a two-column approach to the budget deliberations. 
The vote was declared "a clear majority." 

On May 7, 1990 a resolution offered by Eva Peretsman of Precinct 
4 was adopted, unanimously, as a Sense of the Meeting vote as follows: 

"Resolved that the Board of Selectmen designate the Finance 
Committee meeting room as the Robert L. McVie Room and take 
prompt action to so mark the door and that it be done at the earliest 
time and that the McVie family be so informed." 

The sponsor of the resolution stated that she would "be happy 
to donate the plaque/plate up to $50.00." 



22 



On May 9, 1990 Gerard Perry, chairman of the Finance Committee, 
asked for a Sense of the Meeting by "counted vote" that the Town 
Meeting recommend to the community "that an override of Proposition 
2^ be supported." The vote passed 181-7. 

Action under the articles 

Town Warrant 

ARTICLE 1. 
Essex, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott in said County: 
Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Swampscott qualified 
to vote in the elections and in Town affairs to assemble in their 
respective precincts in said Swampscott, to wit — 

Precinct One Polling Place Machon High on Burpee Road 
Precinct Two Polling Place Clarke School on Norfolk Avenue 
Precinct Three Polling Place Central Fire Station on Burrill Street 
Precinct Four Polling Place Hadley School on Redington Street 
Precinct Five Polling Place High School on Forest Avenue 
Precinct Six Polling Place High School on Forest Avenue 

on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth of April, 1990, at 7:00 in the forenoon, 
then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

To choose a Moderator for one (1) year. 

To choose five (5) members of the Board of Selectmen the for 
one (1) year. 

To choose one (1) member of the Board of Assessors for (3) years. 
To choose one (1) member of the Trustees of the Public Library 
for three (3) years. 

To choose 1 (1) member of the Board of Health for three (3) years. 
To choose one (1) member of the Housing Authority for five (5) 
years. 

To choose one (1) member of the Planning Board for Five (5) 
years. 

To choose one (1) member of the Board of Public Works for Three 
(3) years. 

To choose two (2) members of the School Committee for three 
(3) years. 



23 



To choose one (1) member of Commssioner of Trust Funds for 
three (3) years. 

Shall a Commission be elected to revise the present Charter of 
the Town of Swampscott? 

To choose nine (9) Charter Commission members. 

To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Three for 

one (1) year. 

To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Four for 
two (2) years. 

To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Five for 
one (1) year. 

To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Six for two 
(2) years. 

To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting members in each of the 
six Precincts for three (3) years, 

QUESTION NO. 1 Shall the Town vote to revise its present 
Charter and elect nine (9) Charter Commission Members? 

Yes No 

QUESTION NO. 2 Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed 
to exempt from the provisions of Proposition Two and One-Half, so 
called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to 
fund the expenses and costs connected with the construction of 
sewerage disposal facilities and appurtenances thereto? 

Yes No 

QUESTION NO. 3 A non-binding, public opinion advisory ques- 
tion. Shall the Town vote to accept the proposed trash collection fee? 

Yes No 

QUESTION NO. 4 A non-binding, public opinion advisory 
question. In the event that the trash collection fee is rejected, shall 
the Town be required to refund such fees, without interest, to all persons 
who have paid the fee? 

Yes No 

QUESTION NO. 5 A non-binding, public opinion advisory 
question. Should the Town of Swampscott fund and support its Public 
Library at $227,000, the minimum amount needed, as determined by 
the Board of Library Trustees, to keep the Library open without 
depending on an override vote? 

Yes No 



24 



QUESTION NO. 6 A non-binding, public opinion advisory 
question. Shall the Fire Chiefs position be removed from Civil Service? 

Yes No 

QUESTION NO. 7 A non-binding, public opinion advisory 
question. Do you oppose further cuts or witholding of local aid? 

Yes No 

QUESTION NO. 8 A non-binding, public opinion advisory 
question. Should the State share 40% of its revenue from growth taxes 
(income, state and corporate income) with towns and cities on a 
continuing and consistent basis to help support basic local services 
such as public safety, public health and education? 

Yes No 

At the close of the election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, 
the thirteenth of April 1990, at 7:45 P.M., at the Junior High School 
Auditorium. 

See the report of the Elections Commissioners for the results of 
the 1990 Municipal Election held on April 24, 1990. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, 
Boards, and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted to accept the report of the Salary Study Committee offered 
by Chairman Paul Garland and that the committee be discharged. 

Voted to accept the report of the Capital Improvements Committee 
offered by Chairman Richard Salter and that the committee remain 
in existence. 

Voted to accept the report of the Phillips Park Study Committee 
offered by Chairman Donald Babcock and that the committee remain 
in existence. 

Voted to accept the report of the Field House Renovation 
Committee offered by John Phelan and that the committee remain 
in existence. 

Voted to accept the report of the Roland C. Booma Rink Committee 
offered by Chairman Francis J. Cassidy and to adopt its 
recommendations and that the committee be dissolved. 



25 



Voted to accept the report of the Phillips Beach Fire Station 
Committee offered by committee member Fire Chief William R. Hyde 
and that the committee remain in existence. 

Voted to accept the report of the Regional School District Planning 
Committee offered by Sandra Rotner and that the committee be 
dissolved. 

Voted to accept the report of progress concerning sewage 
treatment in Swampscott offered by Board of Public Works chairman 
David Phillips. 

Date: 4/30/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1990, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 3: That the Town adopt the provisions of this 
article. 

Date: 4/30/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 4. To see what action the Town wil take in relation 
to salaries of elected Town Officials for the ensuing year. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted article 4: That the Town fix the salary of all elected officers 
of the town as provided in Section 108 of Chapter 41, General Laws, 
as amended, for the twelve month period beginning July 1, 1990: 



Selectmen 

Chairman $ 2,200 

Another Member 1,400 

Another Member 1,400 

Another Member 1,400 

Another Member 1,400 



26 



Town Clerk and Collector of Taxes 30,500 

Assessors 

Chairman 1,600 

Member/Secretary 1,150 

Another Member 1,100 

Treasurer 7,000 

Board of Health 

Chairman 220 

Another Member 165 

Another Member 165 

Board of Public Works 

Chairman 1,600 

Another Member 1,100 

Another Member 1,100 

Constable (one of three) 100 

Moderator 100 



Further, that the sum of $2,500 be appropriated for this article 
subject to the successful passage of Proposition 2)^ Override. NOTE: 
The salaries are contained in Article 5. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 5. To see what action the Town will take concerning 
the budget for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1990, and ending 
June 30, 1991, and appropriate the necessary money, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted article 5: That the Town approve this article. The amounts 
of money are appropriated for the several purposes hereinafter 
itemized. Each numbered line item is a seperate appropriation. The 
budget amounts may only be spent for the stated purpose. 



27 



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33 



Date: 5/9/90 



Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 6. To see what action the Town will take on the matter 
of transferring the unexpended balances as shown on the books of 
the Town Accountant as of June 30, 1989 to the Surplus Revenue 
Account, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 6: That action on this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling 
all bills contracted prior to July 1, 1989 and remaining unpaid at 
the time of the closing of the Town's books for the year ending June 
30, 1989 according to the records of the Town Accountant, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 7: That the Town appropriate the sum of $17,899.26 
in order to pay the following bills which were unpaid at the close 
of the 1989 fiscal year on June 30, 1989. Said appropriation to be 
paid from free cash/ available funds: 



Workmen's Compensation: 

Medical Equipment & Devices $ 797.50 

Swampscott Chiropractic 36.30 

Elisco Perez, MD 806.71 

Marcos Szeinfeld, MD 519.26 

Shaughnessy Rehabilitation Hospital 2,670.15 

N.E. Baptist Hospital 2,119.00 

J. Jack Skowronski, MD 79.00 

Salem Hospital 2,072.00 

Bargaining Agent: 
Morgan, Brown & Joy 5,850.00 

Police: 

Brand &Lo 22.00 

Samuel Alexander 309.50 

First Petroleum 1,922.98 



34 



Date: 5/2/90 
Unanimous Vote 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the 
Surlus Revenue Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue 
a sum of money to be used and applied by the Board of Assessors 
in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 8: That the sum of $94,947 be transferred from 
the Surplus Revenue Account to current revenue to be applied against 
the appropriations contained in Article 5 (the budget). 

Date: 5/2/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer 
of various funds from various town accounts which have monies 
remaining therein to such other town accounts which reflect a deficit, 
or take any action relative thereto or in connection therewith. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 9: That the Town transfer monies among FY 1990 
accounts as follows: 

From: Fish House Repairs — $65,336.33 and 
Art. 43 of 1987 Fish House Sprinklers — $2,424.44 
To: Snow and Ice LI 113 — $67,760.77 

From DPW Wages LI 109 — $5,000 

To: DPW Operating Expenses LI 111 ~ $5,000 

From: Assessors Computer Maintenance Li 42 — $660.01 
To: Assessors Salaries LI 36 — 660.01 

From: Harbormaster Equipment Maintenance LI 80 — $200.00 
To: Harbormaster Office Expense LI 79 — $200.00 

From: Veterans Assistance LI 143 — $200.00 
To: Veterans Office Expenses LI 141 -- $200.00 

From: Clerk/Collector Wages LI 26 — $1,848.00 
To: Reserve Fund LI 154 — $1,848.00 



35 



From: Free Cash — $20,123.74 

To: Reserve Fund LI 154 — $20,123.74 

From: Clerk/Collector Wages LI 26 — $3,476.86 
To: Water Bills LI 125 — $3,476.86 

From: Devins and Banks Road Drainage Funds — Article 37 

of 1986 - $45,816.09 
To: Public Works Highway and Safety Maintenance LI 116 — 
$45,816.09 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to provide funds 
necessary to implement the collective bargaining agreements between 
the Board of Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of 
Selectmen. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Town Meeting voted to combine action on Articles 10 and 11. 

Voted Article 10: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to provide funds 
necessary to implement the collective bargaining agreements between 
the School Department personnel and the Town, which includes, but 
is not limited to teachers, school administrators, custodians, cafeteria 
workers, clerical and non-union employees. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 11: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/9 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will amen the Job Classification 
and Salary Plan of the Personnel Board By-Laws as it applies to those 
positions not covered by collective bargaining agreements and 



36 



appropriate the necessary funds, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 12: That all salary and wages other than those 
of elected officers, school personnel or those covered by collective 
bargaining be increased by 4,6%, In the event the override is not 
favorable voted, the payscale will revert to the level they were prior 
to the increse of 4.6%. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town's 
Personnel Board By-Laws, other than the wage and salary 
classification, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted on Article 13: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Board By-Laws so as to reclassify certain existing positions, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 14: That the position of Police Matron, when filled 
by a School Traffic Supervisor, be paid at the rate of $10.00 per hour 
with a minimum call back time of three (3) hours. (NOTE: Funds 
are included in the Police Budget) 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to dispose of Town property or to see if the Town will take 
any other action thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

The Town Meeting voted to combine Articles 15 and 29. 



37 



Voted Article 15: That the Moderator appoint a committee of 
five members to review all parcels of town-owned land and that said 
committee report back to the next Town Meeting with 
recommendations for the sale of any of these lands and the use of 
the funds generated by any such sale. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to remove certain 
positions from Civil Service, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 16: That the Town authorize the Selectmen to 
petition the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to exempt all clerical employees at the Town Administration Building, 
Department of Public Works employees and the secretary to the Police 
Department from the provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws 
applicable to Civil Service status of the incumbents in said positions 
on the effective date of the act creating the exemptions. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 
697 Acts of 1987 to accept certain funding and benefit options. 
Sponsored by the Retirement Board 

Voted Article 17: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to increase the 
Common Victuallers License fee from $25 to $50, in accordance with 
Chapter 140 Section 2 of MGL, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 18: That the Town increase the license fees as 
specified in the Article. 

Date: 5/2/90 

Unanimous Vote 



38 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will amend Section 14C of 
Article V of the General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott by adding 
the following to the schedule of dog licensing fees: Kennel license $50.00 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Clerk Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 19: That the Town amend the General By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott as specified in the Article. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will Amend Article X of the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott by deleting Section one 
and four from said Chapter or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 20: That the Town amend the General By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott as specified in the Article. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money 
for the purchase of fire resistive safes and/or vaults to safeguard the 
records of the Town Clerk and Collector's Office in the Town 
Administration Building and repair the door to the existing vault 
by borrowing or otherwise, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk/Collector/Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 21: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 
39K of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, relating to the establishment 
of enterprise funds; or act in any manner in relation thereto. 

Sponsored by Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 22: That the Town accept the provisions of Section 
39K of Chapter 40 of the General Laws relating to the establishment 



39 



of enterprise funds and to establish the water and sewer utilities as 
an enterprise fund in accordance with said legislation. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 23. To see what action the Town will take with regard 
to the method of payment for debt incurred in connection with the 
Town's treatment of sewage. 

Sponsored by Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 23: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept the Provisions 
of Section 40 of Chapter 653 of the Acts of 1989 regarding assessment 
date changes for new growth or take any action relative thereto. Since 
this provision is optional at the local level, in towns it must be accepted 
by Town Meeting in order to be effective therein. 

Sponsored by the Board of Assessors 

Voted Article 24: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 41 of Chapter 653 of the Acts of 1989 regarding quarterly 
tax bills or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Assessors and the Collector 

Voted on Article 25: That the Town accept the provisions of 
Section 41 of Chapter 653 of the Acts of 1989 which allows the Town 
to bill real estate taxes on a quarterly basis. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 



40 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Health to enter into a long term, not to exceed 20 years in duration 
with RESCO (Refuse Energy Systems Company) for disposal of 
rubbish or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Health 

Voted Article 26: That the Town authorizes the Board of Health 
to enter into a long term contract, not to exceed 20 years in duration, 
for the disposal of rubbish; provided that such contract specifies it 
is dependent on funding on favorable action by Swampscott's Annual 
Town Meetings. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Helath to establish a fund to receive and expend funds received by 
recycling of rubbish or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Health 

Voted Article 27: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town would authorize the Board 
of Health to engage a Hazard Waste Disposal Company to remove 
hazardous waste belonging to the Town. To appropriate the necessay 
funds or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Health 

Voted Article 28: That the sum of $10,000 be appropriated for 
the purposes of this article contingent upon a favorable vote of the 
Town to override Proposition 2)^. 

Date: 5/2/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a By-law 
regarding the use of proceeds from the sale of Town-owned land, or 
buildings, viz. "Proceeds from the sale of Town-owned land or buildings 
shall be deposited in the Town's Capital Improvement Fund." 
Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 



41 



The Town Meeting voted to combine this article with Article 15. 

Voted Article 29: That the subject matter of this article be 
referred to a study committee to be appointed by the Moderator as 
outlined in the vote under Article 15. 

Date: 5/7/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Capital 
Improvement Fund. This fund may receive monies by appropriation, 
gift or bequest. Such monies shall be invested by the Treasurer until 
they are appropriated by Town Meeting for a new or rehabilitative 
capital expenditure. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Voted Article 30: That the Town establish a Capital 
Improvement Fund and that such fund is to be managed as specified 
in the Article. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessary funds to paint the exterior of the Central Fire Station or , 
take any action relative thereto. j 
Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 31: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessary funds to purchase a new car for the Fire Chief or take | 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

i 

Voted Article 32: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 



42 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessary funds to install an exhaust system at the Central Station, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 33: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to purchase forty- 
one (41) turn out coats to be used by the Firefighters or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 34: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to purchase a supply 
of hose for the Fire Department to be used on the apparatus or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 35: That the Town appropriate the sum of $4,000 
for the purpose specified in this article. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to purchase semi- 
automatic pistols and provide the necessary training for the Police 
Department and appropriate a sum of money therefor, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Police Department 

Voted Article 36: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 

Majority Vote 



43 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to purchase protective 
vests (bullet proof) for the Police Department and appropriate a sum 
of money therefor, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Police Department 

Voted Article 37: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to purchase two new 
patrol cars for the Police Department and to trade in two existing 
patrol cars and appropriate a sum of money therefor or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Police Department 

Voted Article 38: That the Town authorize the Police Chief to 
purchase two replacement automobiles and that the sum of $30,040 
be appropriated therefor; further, that the Board of Selectmen be 
directed to dispose of the replaced cars through sale or trade. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to purchase a personal 
computer with emulation and associated software to be used by the 
Police Department and appropriate a sum of money there for or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Police Department 

Voted Article 39: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to purchase the Law 
Enforcement Satellite Training Network to be used by the Police 
Department and appropriate a sum of money therefor or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Police Department 



44 



Voted Article 40: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $9,100.00 for the purpose of immunizing all regular members 
of the Police and Fire Departments against the Hepatitis B virus or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Ambulance Oversight Committee, 
Fire Chief and Police Chief 

Voted Article 41: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will appropriate the necessary 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise, to purchase a new outboard motor 
for the Harbormaster's boat and to authorize the Harbormaster to 
dispose of the existing outboard motor by trade or sale, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Harbormaster 

Voted Article 42: That the Town appropriate the sum of $4,500 
for the purpose specified in the article and that the Harbormaster 
be authorized to dispose of the existing motor through sale or trade; 
further, that the funding be provided by receipts reserved from 
mooring fees and/or boat excise taxes. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the painting of the Senior Center Building located at 
89 Burrill Street, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Council on Aging 

Voted Article 43: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 



45 



Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate by 
borrowing or otherwise, the necessary funds for the purpose of 
purchasing, leasing or otherwise acquiring an automated voting 
tabulation and/or compilation system or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Election Commissioners 

Voted Article 44: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to appoint an Oversight Committee of seven (7) members 
with a Selectman as Liaison to review the implementation and 
construction of the Sewage Treatment Connection, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted Article 45: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money to the design and construction of emergency repair to Essex 
Street Bridge approach ramps or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 46: That the Town appropriate the sum of $7,000 
for the purchase of inclinometers for installation on the Essex Street 
bridge approach ramps. 

Date: 5/7/90 

Counted Vote: 124 Yes; 81 No 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $55,000 for replacement of truck, snow plow and sanding unit 
or take any action relative thereto. 



46 



Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 47: That the Town appropriate the sum of $55,000 
for the purpose specified in the article and that the Department of 
Public Works be authorized to dispose of the existing truck through 
sale or trade; and finally, that the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow this amount through the 
issuance of bonds or notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7, Sub-section 9 and that the 
Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing with any other 
borrowing authorized by Town Meeting. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $16,500 for replacement of one (1) mowing unit and repair 
of eight (8) existing units or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 48: That the Town appropriate $2,000 for the 
repair of mowing machine units. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $10,000 for replacement of guard rails and fencing for approach 
ramps at Essex Street Bridge or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 49: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money to remove lead base paint from and repaint bleacher supports 
and replace damaged seats at Phillips Park Football Field or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 



47 



Voted Article 50: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of $7,000 for replacement of 1950 Clyde Asphalt Roller and Trailer 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 51: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to allow the Town 
to enter into an intermunicipal agreement with other communities 
for the purpose of establishing a regional leaf and yard waste 
composting facility. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 52: That the Town authorize the appropriate 
departments to enter into intermunicipal agreements for the purpose 
specified in the article, any funding to be dependent on favorable action 
by subsequent Town Meetings. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, to purchase and install 
boilers and/or Air Atomizing burners at the Town Hall and various 
school buildings, the purchase of forced draft burners as needed, 
associated controls and equipment, as well as asbestos removal and 
testing, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 53: That the Town appropriate $288,000 for the 
purposes specified in the article, specifically including the Town Hall; 
further, that the funding be provided by effecting the following 
transfers of funds already appropriated by prior Town Meetings as 
indicated, viz: from Article 84 of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting — 



48 



$149,000; from Article 51 of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting — 
$139,000. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, to replace the ceiling 
and light fixtures and lower the heat detectors in classrooms, corridors, 
and stairwells at the Stanley School, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 54: That the Town appropriate the sum of $20,000 
for the purposes specified in the article; further, that the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow this 
amount through the issuance of bonds or notes, under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7, Sub-section 
3A and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing 
with any other borrowing authorized by Town Meeting. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, to continue the 
implementation of an asbestos program in schools and various other 
Town buildings, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 55: That the Town appropriate the sum of $50,000 
for the purpose specified in the article and in addition, that a certified 
licensed asbestos project monitor be on the asbestos removal site at 
all times while work is being done in or around town buildings and 
that this monitor be hired separately from the company doing the 
actual asbestos removal and that at least two references be checked 
and approved for the certified monitor and the asbestos removal 
company doing the job; further that the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow this amount through the 
issuance of bonds or notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7, Sub-section 31 and that the 
Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing with any other 
borrowing authorized by Town Meeting. 



49 



Date: 5/7/90 



Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
necessar.y funds by borrowing or otherwise, to replace a small roof 
at Swampscott High School and to repair any damage done, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 56: That the Town appropriate the sum of $8,000 
for the purpose specified in the article; further, that the funds be 
provided by a transfer of $8,000 from the unexpended appropriation 
under Article 57 of the 1987 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. 

Date: 5/7/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law of the Town of Swampscott as follows: 

In Article III, Sections 4., 5., and 6. shall be reorganized and 
shall list allowed uses as follows: 

Article III 
Section 4. Business B-1 District 

In the Business B-1 District no building or land shall be used 
for any industry or manufacturing purpose, or for any other 
purpose except one or more of the following: 

1. Any use permitted in the Residence A-3 District. A use in 
the A-3 District which requires a special permit shall be 
permitted in the Business B-1 District provided a special 
permit for the use is obtained. 

2. Medical office building having four (4) or less workers in the 
building (regardless of whether they be principals, partners, 
employees or other job classifications). 

3. Office having four (4) or less workers in the building 
(regardless of whether they be principals, partners, employees 
or other job classifications). 



50 



4. Any of the following uses, provided a special permit has been 
obtained from the Board of Appeals as provided in Article 
VI, Section 5.: 



a) . Bowling alley. 

b) . Hotel. 

c) . Theater; movie theater. 

d) . Public garage or gasoline filling station (other than a 

self-service station). 

e) . Restaurant (except for drive-in eating places and 

refreshment stands or other similar uses, as defined 
in Article II, paragraph 21, and except for an all-night 
restaurant as defined in Article II, paragraph 22). 

f) . Retail Store. 

g) . Clinic. 

h) . Bakery; pizzeria; delicatessen; convenience food mart. 

i) . Bank. 

j). Office having more than four (4) workers in the building 
(regardless of whether they be principals, partners, 
employees or other job classifications). 

k). Medical office building having more than four (4) 
workers in the building (regardless of whether they 
be principals, partners, employees or other job 
classifications). 

m). Studio. 

5. Any use accessory to the foregoing, as defined in Article II. 

Section 5. Business B-2 District 

In the Business B-2 District, no building or land shall be 
used for any industry or manufacturing purpose, or for any other 
purpose except on or more of the following: 



SWAMPSCOTT pyfiUC UBRAgK^ . 

51 



1. Any use permitted in the Business B-1 District. A use in the 
B-1 District which requires a special permit shall be permitted 
in the Business B-2 District provided a special permit for the 
use is obtained. 

2. Lumber, coal or other fuel storage, contractors' yard, storage 
warehouse, or uses similar in character to the foregoing, or 
sanitary landfill dump operated under the control and 
supervision of the Board of Health, provided a special permit 
for any use contained in this paragraph is obtained from the 
Board of Appeals as provided in Article VI, Section 5. 

3. Any use accessory to the foregoing, as defined in Article II. 

Section 6. Business B-3 District 

In the Business B-3 District, no building or land shall be 
used for any purpose except one or more of the following: 

1. All uses permitted in a Residence A-1 District, Residence A- 
2, Residence A-3, or Business B-1 District; a use in the 
aforementioned districts which requires a special permit shall 
be permitted in the Business B-3 District provided a special 
permit for the use is obtained. 

2. Golf driving range. 

3. Any of the following uses, provided a special permit has been 
obtained from the Board of Appeals as provided in Article 
VI, Section 5.: 

a) . Hospital (other than a veterinary hospital). 

b) . Apartment house. 

c) . Funeral home. 

d) . Nursing home. 

4. Outdoor Storage and Waste Disposal 

a. All outdoor facilities for fuel, goods, materials, and 
products shall be enclosed by a fence or wall adequate 
to conceal such facilities from adjacent property and 
public view. 



52 



b. No materials or wastes shall be deposited upon a lot 
in such form or manner that they may be transferred 
off the lot by natural causes or forces. 

c. All materials or wastes, which mi^?ht cause objection- 
able odors, fumes, or dust, or which constitute a fire 
hazard, or which may be edible by, or otherwise be 
attractive to rodents or insects, shall be stored outdoors 
only in suitable and appropriate containers. 

Delete from Article III., Section 6., the paragraph entitled: 

"4. Site Plan", and the paragraph entitled: "7. Conditions on 
Special Permit under this Section." 

In Article VI, Section 5. shall be modified as follows: 

Article VI 
Section 5. Special Permits 

A. The Board of Appeals may grant special permits, subject 
to such conditions, safeguards, and limitations on time or use 
as it may impose, in the following cases: 

1. To permit in any district a use which under Article III 
is expressly permitted in that district upon the granting 
of a special permit, subject to general or specific provisions 
set forth therein, and provided such use is in harmony 
with the general purposes and intent of this bylaw. 

2. To permit in any district the alteration or extension of 
a nonconforming structure or use, in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 3 of Article V of this bylaw. 

3. To permit in any district uses acessory to activities 
permitted as a matter of right, which activities are 
necessary in connection with scientific research or 
development, or related production, provided that the 
Board finds that the proposed accessory use does not 
substantially derogate from the public good. 

4. To permit in Districts A-3, B-1, and B-2 conversion of 
a single-family house, containing at least 1,800 square feet 
of floor area devoted to living and sleeping quarters, 
exclusive of basement rooms and open attic, to 



53 



accommodate not more than two families, provided the 
exterior character of a single-family house be maintained, 
except for the addition of any doors at the first floor level 
that may be required by the Building Code, and provided 
the lot area meets the current requirement for lot area 
as set forth and referred to in Article IV, Section 1. or 
the Zoning Bylaw. 

B, The Board of Appeals shall adopt, and may from time to 
time amend, rules relative to the issuance of such special 
permits, and shall file a copy of said rules in the office of 
the town clerk. Such rules shall prescribe the size, form, 
contents, style, and number of copies of plans and 
specifications and procedure for submission and approval of 
such special permits. Such rules shall be consistent with 
Chapter 40A of the General Laws, Sections 81Y through 81BB 
of Chapter 41 of the General Laws, and any other applicable 
provisions of the General Laws as periodically amended. 

Delete paragraphs C, D., and E. from Article VI, Section 5. Insert 
in their place the following: 

C, Special permits shall only be issued following a public hearing, 
in conformity with the provisions of Chapter 40A, Sections 
9. and 11., M.G.L. A public hearing shall be held within 65 
days from the date of filing of an application for special permit. 
Notice of the hearing shall be given by publication and by 
posting, and by mailing to the parties in interest, as provided 
in Chapter 40A. 

The decision of the Board of Appeals shall be made within 
90 days following the date of such public hearing. The required 
time limits for a public hearing and said action, may be 
extended by written agreement between the petitioner and 
the Board. A copy of such agreement shall be filed with the 
Town Clerk. 

Failure by the Board to take final action within said 90 
days or extended time, if applicable, shall be deemed to be 
a grant of the special permit. 

D, A special permit shall lapse after two years from the date 
of the grant, which shall not include such time required to 
pursue or await the determination of an appeal referred to 
in Chapter 40A, Section 17, from the grant thereof, if a 



54 



substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for 
good cause or, in the case of permit for construction, if 
construction has not begun by such date except for good cause. 

E. Special Permit Application Procedure 

Prior to the filing of an application for a special permit, 
the applicant shall submit plans to the Building Inspector 
for review. 

The applicant shall refer to the Rule and Regulations 
of the Board of Appeals for required documentation, fees, 
plans, and drawings to accompany application for special 
permit. 

Six copies of the application and drawings shall be filed 
with the Town Clerk. The applicant shall file one file of the 
application and drawings with each of the following: 

Planning Board 
Board of Public Works 
Town Engineer 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Selectmen 
Building Inspector 
Board of Health 

The aforementioned boards and entities shall review the 
proposed work and make such recommendations as they deem 
appropriate. Said recommendation shall be conveyed to the 
Board of Appeals by written document prior to or during 
the relevant hearing, or by oral presentation at the relevant 
Board of Appeals hearing. 

The failure of the aforementioned boards and agencies 
to make recommendations within 35 days of receipt of an 
application and drawings or by the date of the relevant 
hearing, whichever shall occur first, shall be deemed lack 
of opposition thereto. 

F. Special Permit Review Considerations 

In granting approval of an application for a special permit 
use, the Board of Appeals may attach all reasonable and 
necessary conditions to assure that the character, values, and 



55 



uses of surrounding properties are adequately maintained and 
safeguarded. 

In the special permit review process, and in deciding 
whether to impose any special conditions, the Board of Appeals 
shall take into account, among other considerations, the 
following: 

1. Protection of the adjoining premises and the general 
neighborhood from any detrimental use of the lot or tract; 
that the specific site is an appropriate location for the 
proposed use. 

2. Convenience and safety of vehicular and pedestrian 
movement within the site and in relation to adjacent 
streets, properties or improvements; the location of 
driveway openings and curbcuts in relation to traffic, 
adjacent streets, and existing curbcuts; the provision of 
handicapped access throughout the site. 

3. Responsibility for, and adequacy of, the methods of 
disposal of sewage, refuse, and other waste. 

4. Provision for the loading and unloading of vehicles 
incidental to the servicing of the buildings and related 
uses of the lot or tract. 

5. Relationship of structures and open spaces to the natural 
landscape, and their appropriateness thereto. 

6. Compliance with other provisions of this zoning bylaw, 
including Parking, Landscaping, Architectural, and Sign 
Sections. 

7. Recommendations of other Town of Swampscott boards 
and officials. 

Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 57: That the Town amend the Zoning By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott as specified in the Article. 

Date: 5/9/90 
Unanimous Vote 



56 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 
IV, Section 1, of the General By-laws, in the following manner: By 
inserting a new paragraph following the second paragraph to read 
as follows: "The Board of Selectmen may appoint an attorney who 
is a member in good standing of the Massachusetts Bar, or a 
Massachusetts law firm, to serve as Assistant Town Counsel for zoning 
and planning matters and, further, that said attorney need not be 
a resident of the Town of Swampscott;" or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Board of Appeals 

Voted Article 58: That the Town amend the General By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott as specified in the article. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote that all salary increases 
be in dollars derived mathematically, so that the lower pay scale be 
they contractual or with personal recommendation are not 
discriminated by the percentage increase on higher/highest salaried 
personnel, be they appointed or individually holding contracts from 
Town Departments, Committees, Boards, et. al. 

Sponsored by the Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 59: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will publish a leaflet which 
will detail the employee labor, hiring, contracts of all Town employees, 
officers, persons at all levels of government and departments within 
that parameter of all coverage, so showing the actual earnings 
supported and paid from the taxpayers, and et. al. sources of revenue. 
Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 60: That the Town authorize the Town Accountant 
to compile, and in cooperation with the Treasurer, publish a leaflet 
listing the salaries, other earnings if any, and total earnings of all 
town employees or contract employees whose total earnings are $2,500 
or more; such leaflet to be sold by the Collector's Office at a price 
sufficient to defray the cost of compilation and publication. 



57 



Date: 5/8/90 



Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to reduce overtime 
pay hy the Town and all its entities and divisions and services, with 
the use of compensatory time off in exchange for such needed extended 
time servicces. That the School Department be included in such policy. 
Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 61: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote: That all future Town 
Reports list the names, addresses, total income derived through and 
from the Town's payroll records, regarding our Town employees, 
officers, et al. That such information be made available to newspapers 
in our areas and so be published annually as a public service. 
Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 62: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to elect a Citizen's 
Review Committee. One from each precinct and three at-large 
members. That this committee be composed of citizens not now actively 
serving or working for the Town. 

Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 63: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to have all Finance 
Committee and School Committee meetings televised on our 
Community Cable Network. 

Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 



58 



I 



Voted Article 64: That the Town direct the Selectmen to 
implement the directive specified in this article, provided there is 
no cost to the Town. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to have the School 
Department itemize/list, line by line, its Town Warrant Budget 
Requests and Expenditures as the other Town Departments do. 
Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 65: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to elect a Sewer and 
Water Commission. 

Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 66: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a Business/ 
Residential Property Tax Classification. Since properties not owner 
occupied are income business properties, with all the tax benefits 
unavailable to the owner occupied single house owners. 

Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 

Voted Article 67: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to have an annual 
large items trash pickup. 

Sponsored by Eva Peretsman 



59 



Voted Article 68: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 
Three, Section 1 of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the 
Town shall elect three Selectmen for three-year staggered terms with 
the candidate receiving the highest vote elected to serve a three-year 
term; the candidate receiving the second highest vote will be elected 
to serve a two-year term; the candidate receiving the third highest 
vote will be elected to serve a one-year term. Thereafter each year, 
one member will be elected for a three-year term." 

Sponsored by Robert E. Perry 

Town Meeting voted to combine Articles 69-72. 

Voted Article 69: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 
Three, Section 1 of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the 
Town shall elect five Selectmen for one year with the candidate 
receiving top vote becoming chairperson and at each annual Town 
election thereafter, the voters shall elect five Selectmen for one year 
with the candidate receiving top vote becoming chairperson." 
Sponsored by Robert E. Perry, etal. 

Voted Article 70: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 
Three, Section 1 of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the 
Town shall elect three Selectmen for one year with the candidate 
receiving top vote becoming chairperson and at each annual Town 
election thereafter, the voters shall elect three Selectmen for one year 
with the candidate receiving top vote becoming chairperson." 
Sponsored by Robert E. Perry 



60 



Voted Article 71: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 72. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 
Three, Section 1 of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the 
Town shall elect five Selectmen for three year staggered terms; the 
two candidates receiving the highest vote, and the second highest vote 
elected to serve three-year terms; the two candidates receiving the 
third and fourth highest votes, will be elected to serve two year terms; 
the candidate receiving the fifth highest vote, will be elected to serve 
a one-year term; thereafter, each year, one of the two members 
depending on which term has expired, will be elected for a three year 
term." 

Sponsored by James L. Rudolph 

Voted Article 72: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/8/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money to conduct an independent study of the operations, 
management, and organization of Town government in Swampscott. 
Sponsored by James L. Rudolph 

Voted Article 73: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/9/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and 
raise, by borrowing or otherwise, under any general or special law 
which authorizes the Town to raise money by borrowing or otherwise, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the purposes 
mentioned in the foregoing articles. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 74: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 5/9/90 

Majority Vote 



61 



Special Town Meeting 
November 13, 1990 

Return of Service 

To the Town Clerk: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified 
the inhabitants of the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections 
and in town affairs by posting an attested copy thereof at the Town 
Administration Building, at the Post Office, and in at least two public 
and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in 
the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said 
posting was done October 19, 1990 and not less than fourteen days 
before the day appointed for said meeting. 

William E. Eldridge 
Constable of Swampscott 

The following NOTICE OF A SPECIAL TOWN MEETING was 
mailed to all Town Meeting members on October 18, 1990: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, 
of the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott that a SPECIAL TOWN 
MEETING will be held on Tuesday, November 13, 1990 beginning 
at 7:45 p.m., in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior High School 
on Greenwood Avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, Esq., moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

A legal advertisement consisting of the above NOTICE was pub- 
lished in The Swampscott Reporter on October 25, 1990 on page 35. 

Attendance: 

Attendance for the Special Town Meeting, by precincts, is listed 
at the end of this report. The attendance sheets were posted on the 
bulletin board at the Town Administration Building as required by 
the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott. Said posting was done 
November 14, 1990 and removed 30-days thereafter. 



62 



Town Meeting Action 

The Special Town Meeting of November 13, 1990 was called to 
order at 7:52 p.m. with the necessary quorum present, 175 members, 
by Moderator Martin C. Goldman. 

Town Clerk Jack L. Paster read The Return of Service. 

The Warrant for this Special Town Meeting was opened by the 
Board of Selectmen on September 6, 1990 and closed on September 
25, 1990. 

Action Under the Articles 

ARTICLE 1. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, 
Boards and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 1: That the following reports/comments be 
accepted: 

Fire Chief William Hyde offered a report of progress from the 
Phillips Beach Fire Station Committee. 

William R. DiMento, chairman of the Charter Commission, offered 
a report of progress from his commission. 

Robert E. Perry, chairman of the Board of Selectmen, asked Town 
Meeting members to join him for a moment of silent prayer for the 
serviceman and women who are stationed in the Persian Gulf. He 
introduced Edward Palleschi who is chairing a citizens' committee 
to involve the community in an effort to write letters and send baked 
goods and small gifts to those individuals stationed in the Persian 
Gulf during the crises. 

Eugene Nigrelli, chairman of the Board of Health, gave a report 
of progress from the Recycling Committee. 

Gerard Perry, chairman of the Finance Committee, offered 
comments concerning the town's financial situation. 

Date: 11/13/90 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling 



63 



all bills contracted prior to July 1, 1990, and remaining unpaid at 
the time of the closing of the Town's books for the year ending June 
30, 1990, according to the records of the Town Accountant. 

Sponsored by Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 2: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 11/13/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will amend the Job 
Classifications and Salary Plan of the Personnel Board as it applies 
to those positions not covered by collective bargaining agreements 
and appropriate the necessary funds, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 3: That the Town change the existing pay scale 
for the Administrative Assistant to the Board of Selectmen as 
follows: 



Step 1: $28,160 


To: Stepl: 


$25,000 


2: 29,265 


2: 


25,750 


3: 30,369 


3: 


26,500 




4: 


27,250 




5: 


28,000 



Date: 11/13/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town's 
Personnel Board By-Laws, other than wage and salary classification, 
as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by Personnel Board 

Voted Article 4: That action on this article be tabled. 

NOTE: This article was never removed from the table and died j 
with the dissolution of the meeting. 

Date: 11/13/90 
Majority Vote 



64 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer 
of various funds from various town accounts which have monies 
remaining therein to such other accounts which reflect a deficit, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 5: That $3,000 be transferred from LI 4 (Selectmen's 
Salaries) and $1,000 from LI 42 (Assessors' Computer Maintenance) 
to Li 36 (Assessors' Salaries). Also that $1,400 be transferred from 
"Agency Trust Fund Income" as follows: $400 to LI 92 (Wire Inspector 
Salaries for the Administrative Assistant) and $1,000 to LI 95 (Animal 
Control Officer's Salary). 

Date: 11/13/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $5,500 
for painting of the Senior Center Building located at 89 Burrill Street, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Council on Aging 

Voted Article 6: That $4,900 be transferred from Free Cash for 
the purposes of this article. 

Date: 11/13/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the 
Surplus Revenue Account of the Town to the account of Current 
Revenue, a sum of money to be used and applied by the Board of Assesors 
in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 7: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 11/13/90 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 8. That the Town accept the provisions of Section 39K 
of Chapter 40 of the General Laws relating to the establishment of 
enterprise funds to establish the Cemetery as an enterprise fund in 
accordance with said legislation. 

Sponsored by Board of Public Works 



65 



Voted Article 8: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 11/13/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Section 39K of Chapter 40 of the General Laws relating to the 
establishment of enterprise funds and to establish the Fish House as 
an enterprise fund in accordance with said legislagtion. 

Sponsored by Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 9: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 11/13/90 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 10. HEIGHT, AREA, AND YARD REGULATIONS 
AMENDMENT TO ZONING BY-LAW 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws by 
changing Article IV, Section lA as follows: 

a) delete Section lA of Article IV; 

b) Insert a new Section lA of Article IV to read: 

Section lA. Lots in Common or Separate Ownership 

Any increase in area, frontage, width, yard or depth 
requirements of the zoning by-law shall not apply to a lot for single 
or two-family residential use which at the time of recording or 
endorsement, whichever occurs sooner conformed to the then 
existing requirements and had less than the proposed requirement 
by at least four thousand (4,000) square feet of area and fifty (50) 
feet of frontage. 

Any lot which at the time of recording or endorsement 
whichever occurs or occurred sooner, had less than four thousand 
(4,000) square feet and fifty (50) frontage, shall not be built upon. 

Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 10: That action on this article be postponed 
indefinitely. 

Date: 11/13/90 

Majority Vote 

The Special Town Meeting was dissolved at 10:32 p.m. by a 
unanimous vote. 



66 



Swampscott 1990 Town Meeting 
Attendance Report 



Precinct Name 

1 Alex, John 

Allen, Jean 
Alpert, Julius 
Bates, Wallace T. 
Bickford, Barbara 
Blonder, Cindy MM. 
Blonder, Jeffrey S. 
Butler, Jeanne 
Callahan, Richard M. 
Chaves, Jonas 
Choinard, Madeline 
Corso, Brenda 
Cropley, John H. Jr. 
Daley, John R. 
DiLisio, David 
DiLisio, Vincent R. 
Dolan, Grace 
Dorson, Harold B. 
Dorson, Sylvia B. 
Doyle, William 
Fenelon, James S. 
Greco, Frederick 
Green, Joyce 
Green, Lawrence 
Guarnieri, Caria 
Harrington, Vera C. 
Harris, Ethel 
Hill, Allen 
Hyde, William R. 
Irvine, Anna 
Kaloust, Gerald 
Kaloust, Roberta 
Kearney, Shiela P. 
Legre, David J. 
Legre, J. Arthur 
Leonard, Timothy M. 
Mackey, William E. 
McGrath, Marianne M, 
Mitchell, Bernice 
Murphy, Brian 
Nigrelli, Eugene 
Noonan, Jane 
Palleschi, Michael A. 



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5/8 5/9 11/13 



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67 



Perry, Robert E. 
Picariello, Lawrence 
Plum, Martin 
Simeone, Mary B. 
Simeone, Salvatore J. 
Speranza, Alfred C. 
Speranza, Frances N. 
Tamborini, Thomas 
Waldfogel, Peter D. 
Whittier, Douglas 
Yanofsky, Phillip S. 
Barden, Eugene 
Beatrice, Colleen 
Bowen, David 
Boyce, Thomas J. Jr. 
Brine, Phillip A. Jr. 
Buonopane, Susan 
Buonopane, William 
Cassidy, Peter J. 
Casso, Mark 
Doherty, John J. 
Driscoll, Thomas H. Jr. 
Drucas, Chris 
Dube, Angela 
Dube, John R. 
Gambale, Mary Jane 
Gambale, Michael 
Gookin, Kevin 
Haley, Douglas H. 
Haley, Linda 
Hallion, William 
Hughes, John J. Jr. 
Hughes, Nancy 
Jarvis, Nancy 
Keddie, James 
Kelly, Barbara 
Kelly, Gordon Jr. 
Kenney, Judith A. 
LaConte, Louise M. 
LaConte, Vincent 
Leahy, Matthew 
Leahy, ShielaT. 
Lesnever, Leland 
Lesnever, Marjorie 
Lesnever, Mitchell Lee 
Maguire, Arline 
Marcou, Martha 
Mariano, Paula 
McCarriston, Richard 



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68 



Newhall, Linda A. 
Newhall, Walter E. 
O'Shea, John 
Ott, Margaret 
Paster, Jack L. 
Reagen, John 
Romano, John 
Shanahan, Joseph 
Sherry, Paul 
Squires, Deborah 
Squires, John Jr. 
Sweeny, Timothy 
Travascio, William 
Warnock, Sharyn 
Weiss, Bette 
Whelan, David P. Jr. 
Balliro, Anita 
Breen, Kevin 
Brunner, Michael 
Chesley, Bruce R. 
Clain, Christopher 
Conrad, Louis E. 
Croft, Paul 
Cullen, C. Paige Jr. 
Daivs, Murray 
Dugan, Ellen 
Eldridge, Barbara 
Farwell, Donna L. 
Fields, Scott 
Garvey, Ellen 
Garvey, Michael 
Gilbert, Michael 
Goramn, Paul J. 
Greenbaum, Ann 
Greenbaum, Lawrence 
Hendrickson, Ruth E. 
Holmes, Betty 
Hootnick, Lewis E. 
Huber, Richard 
Hunt, Richard W. 
Hyde, William Jr. 
Jacobs, Scott 
Kane, John C. 
Kelly, Daniel P. 
Koscielecki, Martha J. 
Krumhansl, Ruth 
Longley, Roberta 
MacDonald, Jane P. 
Modini, Louis 



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69 



Moltz, Sandra 
Nestor, Paul R. Jr. 
O'Connor, Evelyn 
O'Connor, Leighton M. 
Olson, Nancy 
Owens, Charles Jr. 
Perry, Gerard 
Polsky, Melvin 
Scanlon, Thomas M. 
Siegel, Lisa 
Smith, Huntley E. 
Souppa, Ralph A. Jr. 
Spinale, Dominic 
Terrell, Daria 
Terrell, John 
Thompson, Mark J. 
Trapasso, Joyce M. 
Walsh, Catherine 
Wasserman, Steven 
Wennik, Joanne 
Wittlinger, Ellen 
Baker, Janet 
Baker, Richard 
Balsama, Joseph 
Beatrice, Peter R. Ill 
Beatrice, Carol A. 
Buckley, Marcus 
Buckley, Susan 
Bush, Ann M. 
Calichman, Harvey 
Garden, Nancy 
Gassidy, Francis J. 
Gassidy, Patricia E. 
Gassidy, Peter J. II 
Cassidy, Tara L. 
Cesarz, Martha 
DeCamp, Margaret 
DiMento. Carol A. G. 
DiMento, William R. 
Donelan, Robert E. 
Dragani, Anthony 
Drummond, Brian 
Finn, Marvin 
Freedman, Arthur B. 
Gold, John A. 
Gould, Gardner L. 
Hughes, Patrick 
Kelleher, Martha Gene 
Kiely, Leslie S. 



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70 



Kline. Alan D. 
Krippendorf, Edward W. 
Levine, Steven B. 
Martin, Miciiael J. 
Mazola, Ernest J. 
Morrison, Charles E. 
Murphy, Patricia M. 
Murphy, Robert W. 
Nelson, Corrine 
Page, Donald M. 
Palleschi, Edward A. 
Peretsman, Eva B. 
Phelan, John V. Ill 
Portnoy, Linda 
Proctor, Sue E. 
Rozen, Nancy 
Santanello, Daniel 
Shanahan, Patricia 
Shanahan, William 
Sherr, Mary Lou B. 
Small, Margaret 
Smith, James E. 
Watson, Brian T. 
Weaver, Sharon 
Webster, Floyd W. 
Whitkin, Nancee L. 
Bane, Richard C. 
Belhumeur, Cynthia H. 
Belhumeur, R. Thomas 
Bloch, Israel 
Burke, John F. 
Callahan, J. Christopher 
Cassidy, Catherine 
Clarke, Marie J. 
Cropley-Backstrom, Nancy 
Epstein, Michael 
Gallo, Louis 
Garfield, Suzanne J. 
Goldberg, Deborah E. 
Goldstein, Francine 
Goldstein, Stanley 
Guy, Clinton J. Jr. 
Hansen, Andrew M. 
Hennessey, Mersine 
Hennessey, William 
Herwitz, Carla B. 
Herwitz, David R. 
Ingram, Robert 
Kahn, Beverly 



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71 



Machnes, Amy R. 
Maitland, Richard E. 
Murphy, Kent F. 
Nellis, Veeder C. 
O'Brien, Timothy 
O'Brien. Vincent P. 
O'Brien, William L. 
Perlman, Harriet 
Reardon, Carl D. 
Rogers, Roberta 
Rotner, Howard E. 
Rotner, Sandra T. 
Rudolph, James L. 
Salinsky, Jody 
Salter, Richard H. 
Shapiro, Mary J. 
Shore, Geraldine 
Shore, Warren J. 
Sklar, Albert J. 
Sklar, Selma 
Smullin, Alix 
Tarmy, Rhonda 
Vatcher, Howard M. 
Vatcher, Theresa J. 
Waelde, Carmen S. 
Wayne, Noreen S. 
Winston, Alice J. 
Wollerscheid, William 
York, Francis A. 
York. Phyllis A. 
Babcock, Donald H. 
Babncock, Elizabeth A. 
Bayard. Susan 
Best, Mary 
Blonder, Susan A. 
Callahan, James C. 
Cleveland. Pamela 
Cohen, Irwin 
Dembowski, Claire 
Dembowski, Henry S. 
Dussault, Barbara R. 
Erlich, Norman A. 
Feinberg, Richard R. 
Feldman. Saul J. 
Glosband. Merrily 
Goldberg, Arthur 
Goldman. Martin C. 
Grab, Barbara 
Gupta. Mary M. K. 



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72 



Kaplan, Susan 
Kessler, Nelson 
Kimmel, Faith R. 
Kimmel, Sidney R. 
Klayman, Nancy 
Koidin, Jill 
Kraft, Lori 
Kravetz, Myer 
Kravetz, Piiyllis 
Lack, Janet C. 
LaPeer, Susan Nault 
Light, Jonathan 
Maloney, Betty Ann 
Mulroy, Esther D. 
Mulroy, Michael 
Navon, Ann 
New, James 
Oppenheim, Reeva 
Palleschi, Arthur J. 
Patrinos, Chris G. 
Schwartz, Cheryl 
Schwartz, Janet S. 
Segal, Maddy 
Sheckman, Sandra 
Shoer, Faith R. 
Shribman, Peter 
Schutzer, Carol 
Schutzer, Kenneth B. 
Silvius, Charles 
Spartos, Mary Anne 
Stoll, Gayle 
Taymore, Jack J. 
Weaver, Walter 
Whittemore, Ann 
Wistran, Julia A. 



X 


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73 



Collector of Taxes — Town Collector 



Jack L. Paster 

Quarterly tax bills: blessing or nightmare? That was the biggest 
story of 1990. 

Until this year, local property taxes were paid twice a year on 
November and May 1. To meet operating expenses, however, 
communities were forced to borrow money for short periods of time 
in anticipation of the tax revenues. In Swampscott, the cost for these 
temporary borrowings was $67,500 per year, and while much of that 
cost was offset by investment earnings, the $67,500 had to be 
appropriated as part of the town's operating budget. 

All communities, due to the restrictions of Proposition 2^, found 
themselves in financial trouble. They looked to the state for help . . . but 
the state was nearly bankrupt. The brain trust on Beacon Hill passed 
a law which was designed to bring local property taxes into municipal 
coffers faster while decreasing the need for temporary borrowing and 
providing an opportunity for increased investment income. Hence the 
quarterly tax billing system was invented and offered to communities 
as a "local option law" which meant it could or could not be adopted 
by each municipality. 

Quarterly taxes were nothing more than an early holiday gift 
from the Commonwealth that they didn't have to pay for. 

A slick mailer was sent not only to municipal Collectors and 
Treasurers but also to Selectmen and Finance Committee members. 
The mailer touted the quarterly tax billing proposal as a way to save 
money for municipalities. Estimates of the money to be saved (and 
earned through increased investments) ran as high as $150,000. 

When the Swampscott Finance Committee saw that they could 
chop $67,500 from the town's Debt Budget they ran full steam ahead 
with the proposal. No consideration was given to the increased 
workload in the Collector's Office in the light of recent reduction in 
staff nor whether the in-house computer system could accommodate 
the proposal. 

As your Collector, I studied the available information and attended 
at least two seminars on the quarterly tax bill topic sponsored by 
the Massachusetts Department of Revenue. In preparation for my 
budget discussions with the Finance Committee I prepared a list of 



74 



the pros and cons of the proposal. My list of cons far outweighed the 
list of pros from an operational standpoint and despite assurances 
of financial and personnel cooperation to implement the quarterly tax 
billing system I expressed strong reservations that Swampscott was 
simply not ready for quarterly taxes, lacked the sophisticated 
computerization necessary to enact the program and argued against 
its implementation. 

The Finance Committee was only interested in the immediate 
freeing-up of $67,500 to be used elsewhere in the budget and the 
potential for increased investment income. They said, in effect, "Just 
do it." 

Town Meeting members, the town's legislative body, accepted the 
statute to collect taxes four times a year. 

The first two tax notices to homeowners were preliminary/ 
estimated bills based on one-half of the net property taxes paid during 
the previous year. The bill due August 1 and the bill due November 
1 were stuffed into envelopes together with an informational flyer 
explaining the system. With the idea being to save money, four seperate 
mailings were not possible. 

The August 1 first quarterly payment went well. But many 
property owners "forgot" that their second quarterly tax bill had to 
be paid before November 1 even though the payment date was printed 
on each bill and widely publicized in the local media. 

The third and fourth quarterly bills, with payments due by 
February 1 and May 1 respectively, were mailed December 26 and 
like the first two tax notices, they were mailed in the same envelope. 

The third payment bill included any unpaid balance from the 
first and second tax periods as well as unpaid rubbish fee assessments, 
unpaid prior year's water usage fees, sewer apportionments and the 
bulk of the property tax increase caused by the town's override of 
Proposition 2^2 and the debt override for the sewer hook-up with Lynn. 

A computer programming error omitted so-called yard items from 
the total valuation (garages, greenhouses, swimming pools, sheds etc.) 
and the third and fourth quarter bills were not split evenly as required. 

As a result, over 2,200 corrected bills had to be printed, and mailed 
and even those corrected bills were incorrect. The yard items that 
were omitted from the original assessments were added into the "land" 
value instead of in the "improvements" value where they belong. 



75 



Adding to the computerization woes, the August 1 and November 
1 payments are added together with the first quarter payment dates : 
not readily available to handle taxpayer inquiries. It was like a 
nightmare! 

While this office is not responsible for any of the problems 
associated with the quarterly billing system, we field over 90 percent ; 
of the inquiries/complaints/protests. It is hoped that the town's in- \ 
house computer will be adjusted and re-programmed to handle the 
quarterly billing system in a more user-friendly manner from a 
collection standpoint and that next year's tax billing will be error 
free. 

Cash Management 

Swampscott continues to reap the rewards of your Collector's Cash 
Management Program which maximizes the earnings on each and 
every dollar recieved at Town Hall. With the cooperation of our 
depository, Century North Shore Bank and Trust Co., each days' 
receipts from taxes, fees and charges are swept from the deposit 
account into an overnight investment vehicle . . . automatically. 
Weekly turnover checks to the Treasurer are deducted from the 
investable balance before the sweeps takes place which means that 
every dollar received at the Collector's window or through the mail 
is invested immediately and begins to earn interest for the town at 
money market rates throughout the year. 

Your Collector earned $22,122.53 from January 1 to December 
31, 1990. 



76 



In Account with the Town of Swampscott — 1990 



COLLECTIONS: 

Real Estate Taxes $12,790,727.36 

Personal Property Taxes 115,579.27 

Automobile Excise Taxes 930,513.99 

Water Use Charges 1,377,520.19 

Water Liens 7,173.79 

Sewer Assessments 2,635.36 

Water Service Charges 20,036.74 

Harbor Mooring Fees 7,683.00 

Boat Excise Taxes 4,877.51 

Rubbish Collection Fees 222,173.70 

Departmental Accounts Receivables 

Pensions 32,146.57 

School Tuition 439,543.50 

Rentals (Fish House etc.) 15,176.30 

Interest and Charges 

Real Estate/Personal Property Tax Interest 39,361.36 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Interest 9,058.22 

Water Use and Water Service Interest 9,353.97 

Water Lien Interest 1,155.64 

Sewer Interest 144.57 

Other Interest/Fees 1,002.65 

Charges and Demand Fees 15,081.69 

Fees for Bd. of Appeals/Planning Bd. Filings 6,300.00 

Fees for By-Law Packages 1,220.00 

Fees for Copying/Certifying Public Records 6,511.90 

Fees for Preparing Cert, of Municipal Lien 11,325.00 

Fines Assessed on Returned Checks 3,389.49 

Collector's Cash Management Interest Earnings 22,122.53 

(July to December) 

Total Collected — 

January 1 to December 31, 1990 $16,091,834.30 



77 



Treasurer 



Jack L. Paster 

With closinpTR and federal take-overs of local banks making 
newspaper headlines the challenges facing local Treasurers are greater 
now than at any other time in recent years. 

Safety, liquidity and yield have always been the priority objectives 
as this office handles the day-to-day management of public funds. 

Your Treasurer has attended seminars on the uncertain banking 
conditions in Massachusetts to keep up with the suggested guidelines 
for prudent risk control. We maintain over 40 different bank accounts 
to afford us the flexibility of timing the market to maximize investment 
income and to seek out safe investments to safeguard our funds. 

Throught the use of FDIC and FDIM insured accounts, 
collaterization of deposits, investments backed by government 
securities and pooled investment fund accounts we feel comfortable 
with our banking relationships and, most importantly, feel that our 
investments are safe and secure. 

Our "concentration" accounts are held locally. Tax receipts and 
revenues of the Collector are deposited into a Cash Management Daily 
Investment Account at Century North Shore Bank and Trust Company 
in Lynn which is part of a debt free holding company that includes 
three banks with a strong capital and asset base. The Veribank Bank 
Rating Service awarded Century its highest award classification for 
1990 as an indication of its soundness and profitability. Our payroll 
and vendor payment accounts are deposited into Eastern Bank in Lynn 
which was rated as "strong" and one of the top ten leading New England 
savings banks. Eastern was also cited as a "winner" on the regional 
banking scene in the New England Banking Report for 1990 published 
by Danielson Associates Inc. in Maryland, a national bank watch firm. 

Investment Income 

A record $263,356 in interest earnings was posted by your 
Treasurer during 1990 through the agressive handling of municipal 
funds. Constant hands-on attention means that every dollar is hard 
at work earning interest which ends up in the Town's Free Cash account 
to be appropriated by Town Meeting, often to reduce the tax levy. 



78 



Since taking office in 1983, your Treasurer has earned 
$1,375,263.26 in earnings in investments for the Town of Swampscott. 

Treasurer's Cash Statement 

In Account With the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1990 $ 4,602,955.59 

Receipts and income from all sources 33,037,508.97 

Less Warrants Paid (Payroll/Vendors) 36,922,742.74 

Balance on hand December 31, 1990 717,721.82 

Interest Income Earned during 1990 = $263,356 

Trust Funds — Special Fund Accounts 



Bal. Int. With- Bal. 



Fund ID 


1/1/90 


Deposits 


Income 


drawals 


12/31/90 


School Funds: 
Phillips Medal 


$ 5,447 


$ 


$ 413 


$ 644 


$ 5,126 


Cemetery Funds: 
Gifts/ Bequests 
Perpetual Care 


73,513 
18,995 


200 



6,059 
1,565 






79,772 
20,560 


Library Funds: 
Gen. Library Tr. 
R. Johnson 
H. Hussey 
A. Linscott 


40,685 
359 
141,155 
100,000 


60 





3,321 
24 
10,774 
2,409 


7,095 
46 
22,551 



36,971 
337 
129,378 
102,409 


Special Funds: 
Conservation Fund 
Emp. H-L Trust 
Swampscott Drug 
Enforcement Fund 
Performance Bonds 


35.404 
179,876 
7,138 

83.917 




713,618 
2,504 

6,345 


2,916 
13,783 
583 

42,068 




722,151 
6,819 

84,304 


38,320 
185,126 
3,406 

48,026 



Swampscott Debt 

Every second year your Treasurer publishes a complete Debt 
Schedule in this report which details the payment dates, specific 
purpose and breakdown of the principal and interest on each debt 
payment for the Town of Swampscott. 



79 



The purpose of this schedule is to allow residents the opportunity 
to review the town's debt position and to track the authorized debt 
on an article by article basis. 

Town of Swampscott — Bonded Indebtedness 
As of 1/1/91 



FY Date 


Loan Purpose 


Principle 


Interest 


Total 


Bank 


iqqi qi/m/01 


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25 725 R4 


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38 860 00 


538 860 00 






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229 293 1 2 


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210 000 


12 862 OR 


222 R62 OR 


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1 7 000 no 


1 1 7 000 on 


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iO.UUv.vv 


1 3 600 00 

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216 431 04 

^ X.\Jy*±KJ X« V** 


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xjaiiiv vx xj\jo\j\jii 


94/08/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 


100,000 


13.600.00 


113,600.00 


Shamut 


95/02/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 




10.200.00 


10,200.00 


Shamut 


1996 95/08/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 


75,000 


10.200.00 


85,200.00 


Shamut 


96/02/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 




7,650.00 


7,650.00 


Shamut 


1997 96/08/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 


75.000 


7,650.00 


82,650.00 


Shamut 


97/02/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 




5,100.00 


5,100.00 


Shamut 


1998 97/08/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 


50.000 


5,100.00 


55,100.00 


Shamut 


98/02/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 




3,400.00 


3,400.00 


Shamut 


1999 98/08/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 


50,000 


3,400.00 


53,400.00 


Shamut 


99/02/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 




1.700.00 


1,700.00 


Shamut 


2000 99/08/01 


Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 


50,000 


1,700.00 


51,700.00 


Shamut 




Total: 


6.600,000 


754,082.00 


7,358.385.00 





80 



Loan Breakdown 



Mun Purp. #8 G.O Bonds (formerly Mun. Purp. #7 BAN) = 

1986 TM Articles (original BAN 1/29/87): 
BCBS Judgement for Police ~ 16,000 
Treatment Plant Waiver — 120,000 
Prospect Street Sewer — 110,000 
Sewer System Evaluation — 30,000 
School Roofs — 92,000 

School Energy Windows/Doors — 45,000 

Fish House Sprinklers — 40,000 

Sewer Equipment — 20,000 

DPW Trucks - 14,000 

Sub-total — 487,000 

Less Pay-down of 97,400 

Total of 1986 Articles — 389,600 

Also — 

1987 TM Articles (original BAN 1/29/87): 
Computer Equipment — 80,000 
In-house Computer Update — 15,000 
Ambulance — 45,000 

Fire Engine — 90,000 
Fire Truck — 24,000 

Storm Damage/Sea Wall Repairs — 100,000 

Treatment Plant Equipment — 207,500 

Sewer System Evaluation — 15,000 

Dredging Tedesco Pond ~ 52,500 

Sidewalk Maintenance — 40,000 

DPW Equipment — 58,000 

School Repairs (three articles) — 63,200 

School Vans — 30,000 

School Energy Windows — 47,700 

Total of 1987 Articles — 867,900 

Sub-total of 1986-87 TM Articles — 1,257,500 

Less Pay-down of 270,980 

Total — 986,520 

Also — 



81 



1988 TM Articles: 

Design of Secondary Treatment Plant — 220,000 
Sewer System Evaluation Survey — 150,000 
DPW Sidewalk Repairs — 20,000 
Paradise Road Water Mains — 161,640 
DPW Front End Loader — 60,000 
School Department Equipment — 20,000 
School Printing Press and Equipment — 30,000 
Sch. Energy Cons. Windows/Doors — 123,900 
Basketball/Tennis Court Repairs — 36,350 
DPW Pumping Station Repairs — 23,000 
Council on Aging Van — 35,000 
Phillips Bch. Fire Sta. Renovations — 65,000 
School Asbestos Removal — 40,500 
School Repairs — 15,000 
Boilers for Schools and Town Hall 170,000 
Total of 1988 Articles — 1,170,390 

Sub-total for G.O. #8 Bonds — 2,156,910 

Total for Mun. Purp. #8 G.O. Bonds (rounded up for 
even bond amount) — 2,160,000 

Mun. Purp. Note of 1990 = 

1988 Art. 82 — Field House Renovation, $176,000 

1989 Art. 17 — Asbestos Removal, $160,000 
Art. 37 — Sewer Jetter Vaccuum, $32,000 
Art. 51 — School Burners/Boilers/Atomizers, 
$139,000 

Art. 52 — School Energy Windows, $33,000 
Art. 58 — School Little Theater Lighting. 
$35,000 

1990 Art. 47 - DPW Truck/Plow, $55,000 
Art. 54 — School Repairs, $20,000 
Art. 55 — Asbestos Removal, $50,000 
Total $700,000 



82 



Accounting Department 



Keith A. Callahan, Town Accountant 



In compliance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 41, 
Section 61, I herewith submit to you the annual report of the Town 
Accountant for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1990. Details of financial 
transactionns of the Town are set forth in the accompanying schedules: 



1. Balance Sheet 

2. Appropriation Report 

3. Schedule "A" Condensed 

4. Debt Statement 

5. Analysis of Estimated Receipts vs. Actual Receipts 



83 



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93 



Schedule "A" 

Condensed 



General Fund Revenue 








Taxes 






$13,833,183 


Charges for Service 






1,755,779 


Licenses & Permits 






141,800 


Revenue from State 






1,555,302 


Other Governmental Revenue 






88,879 


Fmes & Forfeitures 






53,030 


Earnings on Investments 






243,719 


Total Revenues — Gen. Fund 






$17,672,692 


Other Revenue 


School 


Special 


Trust 


Charges for Service 


$ 189,909 


$ 


$ 


Fees 


106,467 






Tuition 


465,100 






Fer. Rev — State 


173,510 






State Aid — Education 


1,585,420 






Other State Aid 


5,876 


35,666 




Other Charges 




46,223 




Miscellaneous 




27,699 




A i. 

Assessments 






881,266 


Earnings 






47,199 


Total Other Revenues 


$2,526,282 


$ 109,588 


$ 928,465 


General Fund Expenditures 


Town 


School 


Total 


Personal Services 


$7,186,913 


$7,235,023 


$14,421,936 


Purchase Service 


1,484,214 


971,956 


2,456,170 


Supplies 


348,746 


267,213 


615,959 


Intergovernmental 




82,960 


82,960 


Other Charges & 








Expenditures 


557,423 


435,389 


992,812 


Court Judgement 


22,279 




22,279 


Construction 


i,ooo,yoy 




1 QQQ QQQ 

i,ooo,yoy 


Other Capital Outlay 


78,229 


198,344 


276,573 


Debt Service 


1,291,023 




1,291,023 


Total Gen. Fund Expenditures 


$12,807,816 


$9,190,886 


$21,998,701 


State & County Assessments 






$ 662,689 



94 



Other Expenditures 

Personal Services 
Purchase Services 
Other 

Construction 



Special 

$ 11,404 $ 



139,879 
18,200 
371,929 



891,608 
13,484 



Trust 



Total Other Expenditures $ 541,412 $ 905,092 

The Schedule "A" is a report prepared for the state and federal 
Government. There is 54 pages 8^" x 14". The unabridged copy is 
available and can be viewed during regular hours at the office of 
the town accountant. 



Schedule of Changes in Town Debt 

Statement of Indebtedness Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30, 1890 



Outstanding Outstanding 
July 1, 1989 Issued Paid June 30, 1990 



Funded Debt 
General Debt 



Inside Debt Limit 
Outside Debt 
Limit 



$ 2,428,540 



1,524,842 



$655,961 



342,421 



$ 1,772,679 



1,182,421 



Total Funded Debt 
Bond Anticipation 

Authorized 

Unissued 



$ 3,953,382 



$998,382 



$18,490,810 



$ 2,955,000 



95 



Comparison of Estimated Receipts Used In Calculating Tax Rate 
with Actual Receipts In Fiscal Year Ended 6/30/90 



State 


Estimated 


Actual 


Variance 


School Air] Chapter 70 


$490,291.00 


$74,610.00 


$484,319.00 


Additional Assistance 


1,007,203.00 


1,007,203.00 




Racial Imbalance 


264,331.00 


270,333.00 


6,002.00 


School Lunch 


8,661.00 


5,876.14 


(2,784.86) 


School Improvements 


4,780.00 




(4,780.00) 


Horace Mann 


5,122.00 


1,540.00 


(3,582.00) 


School Transportation 


37,119.00 


44,398.00 


7,274.00 


School Construction 


235,081.00 


235,081.00 




Tuition State Wards 


16,079.00 


31,41700 


15,338.00 


Public Libraries 


10,421.00 


10,371.00 


(50.00) 


Additional Aid Public Libraries 


3,296.00 


1,186.00 


(2,110.00) 


Police Career Incentive 


40,776.00 


32,232.00 


(8,544.00) 


Veterans Benefit 


4,410.00 


5,303.81 


893.81 


Highway Fund 


20,348.00 


20,232.00 


(116.00) 


Lottery 


395,851.00 


395,851.00 




L/Oss 01 1 axes — ADaiemenis 








Veterans 


5,338.00 


5,163.00 


(175.00) 


Blind 


4,375.00 


4,375.00 




Surviving Spouses 


1,750.00 


1,750.00 




Elderly Pensions 


26,879.00 


27,102.00 


223.00 


Total From State 


$2,582,111.00 > 


$3,074,018.95 


$491,907.95 


Town 








Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 


$986,570.48 


$844,793.91 $(141,776.57) 


Penalties & Interest on Taxes & 








Excises 


76,367.48 


60,365.21 


(15,002.27) 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


11,950.00 


8,075.00 


(3,875.00) 


Water 


1,508,000.00 


1,392,995.40 


(115,004.60) 


Trash Disposal 


191,587.96 


226,727.70 


36,139.74 


Departmental Revenue 


177,340.35 


215,809.12 


38,468.77 


Special Assessments 


33,986.56 


28,651.20 


(5,335.36) 


Fines & Forfeits 


74,347.07 


99,983.83 


25,636.76 


Investment Income 


206,955.27 


243,718.95 


36,763.68 


Ambulance Fees 


30,660.43 


29,616.90 


(1,033.53) 


Total From Town 
GRAND TOTAL 


$3,296,755.60 $3,150,737.22 $(146,018.38) 


$5,878,866.60 $6,224,756.17 


$345,889.57 



96 



Zoning Board of Appeals 



Ann M. Whittemore, Chairman 
Charles Hall, Vice Chairman 
Kenneth B. Shutzer, Clerk 
William O'Brien 
Charles Morrison 

Associate Members: 
Anthony Pasciuto 
Peter Shribman 

The Zoning Board of Appeals held 11 hearings during the year 
ending December 31, 1990; 55 new petitions were heard and a hearing 
was held on a remand order from the Land Court. We would like 
to thank Louis Gallo, Inspector of Buildings, for his technical support 
and assistance. The Associate Members of the Board contributed 
valuable assistance and expertise to the Board. 

The Board of Appeals and Planning Board worked together during 
the year to amend the Special Permit provisions for the Business 
Districts in response to a pending Court case. The Court's decision 
deleted the prior provisions of our Zoning By-Law pertaining to Special 
Permits for businesses. We look forward to further work with the 
Planning Board in addressing issues which arise concerning the Zoning 
By-Law. 

The Zoning Board adopted new Rules and Regulations and a new 
application form during the year. This was done to assist petitioners 
by clarifying our requirements and procedures. 



97 



Animal Control 



James S. Stone, Sr. 



Dogs Lirensed 862 Dogs Returned To Owners 75 

Citations Issued 93 Dogs P.T.S. 3 

Dogs Caught 79 Dogs/Cats Placed For Adoption 11 

Dogs Confined 28 Reported Missing Dogs/Cats 156 

Complaints Received 705 Dogs/Cats Transported to H.A.H. 31 

Offenses Charged 

Leash Law 4 Excessive Barking 3 

Failure to License 50 Parks and Beaches 3 

Pooper Scooper 2 Warnings Issues 124 

Miscellaneous 

Accidents Involving Dogs and Cats 18 

Injured or Sick Dogs Transported to H.A.H 8 

Dog Bites Reported 9 

Income 

Dog License Fees $8,655 

Fines Collected 1,000 



I would like to take this opportunity to express my deep 
appreciation to the many individuals and departments who have helped 
to make the first six months of my tenure as A. CO. enjoyable and 
productive. Most notably, the men and women of the Swampscott Police 
Dept. for their strong support and cooperation. To Bob Perry and 
the Board of Selectmen for their united effort to see that this 
Department reaches an increased level of safety and service through 
adequate equipment and funds. Thank you to Jack Paster, Kent 
Murphy, Keith Callahan and Alan Taubert for their help and 
assistance. A special thank you to Sue Ellen Woodcock of the 
Swampscott Reporter for her repeated willingness to report the 
comings and goings of the Town's A.C.O. And finally, to my wife 
Barbara, who has put up with the burnt dinners, missed outings and 
the frantic calls at all hours of the night and day so that I might 
fulfull my obligations. 

During the past six months I have strived to make Service and 
Professionalism the corner stones of this office. Albeit part- time, this 
is now a full service department offering Law Enforcement, Rescue, 
Protection, Adoption, Education, Trapping and Wildlife Assistance. 

Two new programs have been enacted this year, the first is 
PROJECT WILD, an ongoing census to establish population numbers 



98 



and distribution of skunks, racoons, opossums and fox within the 
borders of Swampscott and, secondly, an Educational Safety Program 
targeted to the Elementary grades on the Dos and Don'ts when dealing 
with Domestic and Wild Animals. 

A final remembrance. To that very special and select group of 
Dog Owners who let their beloved pets run free; bark at all hours 
of the night; and use our beaches and parks for their — Ahem! — 
Private Privy. I say thank you. Prompt payment of your fine is 
appreciated, as these funds will be put to good use by this department. 

Board of Assessors 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its Annual Report for 
the citizens of the Town of Swampscott for the year 1990. 

Vera C. Harrington was reelected to a three year term on the 
Board and Anthony F. Benevento served as president of the Essex 
County Assessors Association. 

At the Board's reorganizational meeting, following the Town 
Election, Anthony F. Benevento was elected Chairman and Vera C. 
Harrington, Secretary. 

The Assessors implemented an updated revaluation program for 
this Fiscal Year. Also implemented was a new billing system which 
sent two billings and four tax bills to taxpayers. 

It also was the start of a declining real estate market. Knowing 
this, the Board decided that they would review the new values assessed 
for 1990 and reflect the present market conditions by lowering, where 
applicable, the property values for Fiscal Year 1991. 

The Board was able to accomplish changing values in both 1990 
and 1991 because of the in-house computer. If the market continues 
to decline, this computer system will again save thousands and 
thousands of dollars that would have to be paid to consultants to 
complete the work. 

The Board of Selectmen voted to split the tax rate for Fiscal Year 
1991 at $12.49 per thousand for property classified as residential, and 
$19.56 per thousand for property classified as commercial, industrial 
and personal property. 



99 



The Board expresses its thanks to Town Accountant, Keith 
Callahan and Town Counsel Arthur Palleschi. 



Statutory Exemptions on real estate, which are mandatory under 
Chapter 59, General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to qualifying home owners, totalled in the amount of $94,348.77. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures to determine 



the tax rate for Fiscal Year 1991: 

Gross amount to be raised $ 21,852,115.28 

Estimated receipts 6,148,115.13 

Net amount to be raised by taxation $ 15,704,000.15 

Real Estate valuation $ 1,195,886,535.00 

Personal Property valuation 8,236,810.00 

Total valuation $ 1,204,123,345.00 



Tax Rate Fiscal 1991: $12.49 Residential 

$12.49 Open Space 

$19.56 Commercial 

$19.56 Industrial 

Real Estate property tax $ 15,542,326.20 

Personal Property tax 161,112.00 



Total taxes levied on property $ 15,703,438.20 

Motor vehicles assessed (not figured in tax rate) 

Number of cars assessed $ 11,308 

Valuation of cars assessed $ 34,707,050.00 

Excise tax on cars assessed $ 806,521.48 



Respectfully submitted, 

Board of Assessors 
Anthony F. Benevento, Chairman 
Vera C. Harrington, Secretary 
Ernest J. Mazola 



100 



II. AMOUNT TO BE RAISED 



A. APPROPRIATIONS (col. (b) through col. (e) from Schedule 8, Page 4) $ 20,593,178.73 

B. OTHER AMOUNTS TO BE RAISED 

1. Amounts certified for tax title purposes $ 1500.00 

2. Debt and interest charges not included in Schedule 8 $ 9754.00 

3. Final court judgments $ 22278.90 

4. Total overlay deficits of prior years $ 99300.25 

5. Total cherry sheet offsets (see cherry sheet 1-ER) $ 238718.00 

6. Revenue deficits $ 

7. Offset receipts deficits Ch. 44 Sec, 53E $ 

8. Charter Commission $ 5000.00 

9. $ 

TOTAL B (Total lines I through 9) $ 376,551.15 

C. STATE AND COUNTY CHERRY SHEET CHARGES (C.S. 1-EC cols.l and 2)$ 579,642.00 

D. ALLOWANCE FOR ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS (OVERLAY) ... $ 302,743.40 

E. TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE RAISED (Total llA through IID) $ 21,852,115.28 

in. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND OTHER REVENUE SOURCES 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS - STATE 

1. Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts (C.S. I-ER Total Part D) $ 2440440.00 

2. Cherry Sheet Overestimates (C.S. 1-EC Part E col. 3) $ 2209.00 

TOTAL A (Total Lines 1 and 2) $ 2,442,649.00 

B. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS - LOCAL 

1. Local Receipts Not Allocated (Page 3, col. (b), Line 26) $ 3004589.40 

2. Offset Receipts (See Schedule A-I) $ 

3. Enterprise Funds (See Schedule A-I) $ 

TOTAL B (Total Lines 1 through 3) $ 3,004,589.40 

C. REVENUE SOURCES APPROPRIATED FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES 

1. Free Cash (Page 4, col. (c)) $ 42923.00 

2. Other Available Funds (Page 4, col.(d)) $ 563006.73 

TOTAL C (Total Lines 1 and 2) $ 605,929.73 

D. OTHER REVENUE SOURCES APPROPRIATED SPECIFICALLY TO 
REDUCE THE TAX RATE 

1. Free Cash . . . date of appropriation (04/30/90) $ 94947.00 

2. Municipal Light Source $ 

3. Other Source (Specify) $ 

TOTAL D (Total Lines 1 through 3) $ 94,947.00 

E. TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND OTHER REVENUE SOURCES 

(Total niA through HID) $ 6,148,115.13 

IV. SUMMARY OF TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE RAISED AND TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ALL 
SOURCES 

FILL IN AFTER PAGE 1 IS COMPLETE 

A. TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE RAISED (from HE) $ 21.852,115.28 

B. TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND OTHER 

REVENUE SOURCES (from HIE) $6148115.13 

C. TOTAL REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LEVY (from IC) $ 15704000.15 

D. TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (TOTAL IVB plus IVC) $ 21,852,115.28 

(IVA MUST EQUAL IVD) 



101 



Building Department 

Louis Gallo, Inspector of Buildings 

Alternate Building Inspectors: 
Kathleen Magee 
Richard Macintosh 

Helen M. Collins, Administrative Assistant 

I hereby submit the following report for 1990: 

Amount of Construction $6,463,509 

Permits Issued Building 477 
Plumbing 225 
Gas 240 

Fees collected for permits and inspections — building, plumbing 
and gas — $ 74,617 

Construction during the year increased by $1,131,033. 

Increase in amount of fees collected was 20,016. 



Building Permits Issued: 

Single Family 8 

Duplex 1 

Fireplaces, stoves, chimneys 5 

Additions 28 

Repairs, renovations, remodeling 193 

Roofs 55 

Decks, porches 35 

Garages 5 

Pools 6 

Signs 4 

Commercial 11 

Demolitions 3 

Miscellaneous* 123 



*Gutters, windows, doors, siding, stairs, etc. 

Despite the economy, there was an increase in the amount of 
construction and the amount of fees collected. Construction was about 
95% completed at the Shipswatch Condominiums. 



102 



Renovations at the Field House, Summit Estates and the 
Swampscott Housing Authority apartments on Cherry Street were 
done during the year. 

The state has purchased residences to be used for group homes. 
The residences require renovations and inspections to insure they are 
up to code. 

The Building Department issues permits & inspects all 
construction. Town Zoning By-Laws are enforced as well as State 
Zoning and Building Code Safety Directives. Violations of Zoning By- 
Laws are investigated. 



Blocksidge Fieldhouse Study Committee 

A Committee formed to study and oversee the repair and 
renovation of the Blocksidge Fieldhouse located at the Town's Athletic 
Facility on Humphrey Street. 

Committee Members: 

John V. Phelan, HI, Chairman 
Jon F. Burke 
Richard R. Feinberg 

Tom Belhumeur 
William Hennessey 
Daniel C. Cahill 
Daniel Kelly 
Paul Gorman 
Martha Cray Kelleher 
Kathy Magee 

Consultants: 

Richard Coletti 
William Bush 
Richard Baker 
James Polando 

The Committee was initially formed relative to Article 82 of the 
1988 Annual Town Meeting. The Committee first met in June of 1988 
in order to assess the condition and long term utilization requirements 
of the fieldhouse building. 

The building was found to be derelict in functional utility and 
suffer from extensive deferred maintenance. At following meetings 



103 



the Committee reviewed proposed plans, by outside consulting and 
engineering firms, for the modernization and renovation of the 
building. 

Gale Associates Inc. of Weymouth completed the final accepted 
architectural plans. These plans addressed the building becoming fully 
handicap accessible along with handicap showers and restrooms. In 
addition a new trainer's room and weight room were designed. 

The removal of an asbestos encased boiler and expansion tank 
inside the building delayed the construction schedule of this project. 
This problem though was finally resolved. 

G.V.W. Inc. of Swampscott was the general contractor for the 
repair and renovation of the fieldhouse. This company installed all 
new plumbing, heating and electrical within the building. At this 
time the coaches room was also renovated, and a new hot water system 
for the showers and fire alarm system for security were installed. 

The renovations to the building were finished on schedule for the 
beginning of the school year, and the project was completed under 
the allocated budget of $180,000.00. 

The Committee would like to thank all of the Town Boards, 
employees and individuals for their help and cooperation with this 
project. 

Personnel Board 

Ann M. Whittmore, Clerk 
Peter C. McCarriston 
Keith A. Callahan 
Richard C. Bane 

In accordance with Section 3(f) of the Personnel Board By-laws, 
the Personnel Board herewith submits its thirty-first report to the 
Board of Selectmen and to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott. 

The Personnel Board met several times during the past year to 
act on matters brought before it by various boards, department heads, 
and individuals. 

Subsequent decisions were made and implemented and a number 
of Articles were sponsored in the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting. The Board wishes to thank all town boards and individuals 
who have given us assistance and cooperation during the year. 



104 



Cable Advisory Committee 



Charles R. Borgioli, Chairman 
Louise LaConte 
Gary Young 
Bruce Grordon 
Paula Mariano 
Ken Maas 

The Cable Advisory Committee is continuing to aggressivly work 
with Warner Cable to insure quality service to Swampscott. We are 
continually monitoring areas of service, signal quality, response to 
complaints and public access. 

We are continuing to work with Warner on the transfer of the 
license with respect to a change in their ownership that involved 
Warner and Time/Life. We expect the transfer to be approved soon. 

The exclusivity regulations of the Federal Communications 
Commission have frustrated our attempts to bring back network 
alternative channels as most of the prime time would be blacked out. 

The coverage of local events and local access are still important 
areas to the committee. We insure that Warner fulfills its commitment 
in these areas. We are continually monitoring equipment performance, 
adequate training for those who desire it and proper surroundings 
for locally produced programs. A local access user, Blarney 
Broadcasting, passed yet another milestone this past year by beginning 
weekly live broadcasting from the Swampscott Studio. They provide 
coverage of a multitude of local sporting events and local athletes, 
featuring junior sports in particular. They also provide coverage of 
other special events and issues. Halloween safety and "care" packages 
and needs of the local military people participating in Desert Shield/ 
Storm were among their more significant non-sporting shows. Many 
of their shows feature call-in segments and trivia contests with prizes 
provided by Warner Cable. 

The goals of the committee for the future include finalizing the 
transfer of the license, improve, upgrade and replace equipment as 
needed to insure top quality performance of the system and equipment 
available to the users. We will continue to represent the public with 
respect to fees and support any legislation that will implement 
regulation of fees and providing more local control of cable systems. 
We will be setting priorities and addressing issues with regard to 
1995 when the current license expires with thoughts as to what the 
Towns needs and desires may be. 



105 



We would be remiss in not thanking Terry O'Connell, general 
manager and Marcia Bilias, local program director of Warner, as 
well as Leonard Kaplin of the Swampscott Studio for their efforts 
and cooperation in working with the committee. A special thanks to 
Charlie Lj^ons and John Regan for their active role in working with 
the committee and their valuable expertise in the area of equipment 
performance, quality evaluation, and production needs. 

The committee continues to urge townspeople to become involved 
with the cable system and utilize the public access facilities and 
equipment. Training in the areas of equipment use, production and 
broadcasting are available from Warner. The committee encourages 
and welcomes comments and suggestions from residents on what can 
be done to improve our cable system. 

Department of Civil Defense 

The Swampscott Civil Defense had a fairly quiet year with the 
exception of having to respond to the City of Lynn, as requested by 
Massachusetts Area 1 headquarters, to provide emergency lighting 
for security during toxic lead removal operations. We responded to 
Blodgett Avenue to provide lighting during the emergency seawall 
restoration. 

With the assistance of John and Andy Telford we have been able 
to keep the equipment in running shape. Donations of tools, lighting 
equipment or other equipment that could be used during emergencies 
are always welcome. Volunteers are welcome, even if only during an 
emergency. Please contact the Director at 598-3732, for more 
information. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard E. Maitland 



106 



Conservation Commission 

Annual Report 1990 

Lawrence F. Picariello, Chairman 
David Dilisio 
Harold Keating 
Richard P. Major 
David McCarthy 
Barbara Schaefer 
Nelson Kessler 

The Conservation Commission held twelve meetings, including 
four public hearings under the Wet Land Protection Act on Requests 
for a Determination of Applicability. Permission with conditions were 
granted to all twelve requests. As a result of a severe coastal storm 
causing substantial beach erosion, the Commission also heard four 
Emergency Requests for Certification by property owners along 
Phillips Beach (for repair work) which were approved. 

In November, Sarah P. Ingalls resigned from the Commission. 
Her expertise and commitment to service for the Town will be deeply 
missed by the Commission. Nelson Kessler was appointed to the 
Commission in the Fall of this year. 

We would like to thank the D.P.W. for all the help they have 
given the Commission over the past year. 

Lawrence F. Picariello, Chairman 



107 



Council on Aging 



Alice Winston, Chairman 
Lorraine Pelletier, Secretary 
Ruth Roche, Treasurer 
Martin Plum 
Roberta Kaloust 
Vincent P. O'Brien 
James Kapoll 
Renee Plum 

The Council on Aging has seen many changes this year. Foremost 
was the upgrading of our clerk/coordinator position to that of director. 
By upgrading this position, the Council and the entire functioning 
of the Senior Center has been greatly enhanced. Daily on site decisions 
are made by our director, Elaine Capone. The planning of trips, parties, 
and programs and the daily operations of the Center are also the 
responsibility of our director. Elaine helps seniors with their problems 
and provides information when needed. Elaine Capone has received 
many commendations for her work and she is definitely an asset to 
our Council and to our elderly community. 

Our senior van which was purchased for us by the town bears 
the logo "Seniors on the Move." This logo took on a new meaning 
this year. Not only were we able to use the van to increase the 
availability of transportation for shopping and for doctors 
appointments for our seniors, but we were able to help the high school 
seniors when transportation was needed. Because of the availability 
of the van, day trips have been taken to Kittery, Maine, North Shore 
Music Theatre, Giordano's Dinner Theatre, Lord Chauncey Manor, 
the Monet Art Exhibit, and Concord and Fall River Massachusetts. 

One of the most interesting programs has been the interaction 
of our seniors with the elementary schools and the high school. Our 
seniors have attended the Machon School for a day of reminiscing, 
story telling, and exchanging of ideas. The students from Machon 
have visited the senior center to plant flower bulbs. The entertainment 
provided by the Hadley students at our monthly birthday parties has 
been such a treat. Stanley School students have made beautiful 
birthday and holiday place mats for the lunch trays. Our seniors were 
honored by the Clarke, Machon and High Schools with parties and 
luncheons. 

The Council actively searched for grants. We were the recipients 
of a State Formula Grant, a one time only Stabilization Grant and 



108 



a Lottery Arts Grant. It was because of the funding from the 
stabilization grant that the Council was able to extend the hours of 
our director and improve our outreach program. Our goal is to have 
contact with every senior in town. 

Our St. Patrick's Day party, the summer picnic and the Christmas/ 
Hanukkah party were all well attended and very successful. The 
nutrition program can boast a yearly increase of 1200 meals served. 
Japanese Bunka Embroidery and Tailoring were two other programs 
which were very popular. 

In an effort to maximize the usage of our center, the Council 
decided to let various town boards meet at our building. At this time, 
we would be remiss if we did not thank the recent special town meeting 
for allowing us the funds to paint our building in the spring. 

Lastly, the Council would like to thank our more than 55 devoted 
volunteers for their countless hours of help. We could not survive 
without them. 



109 



Board of Election Commissioners 



Francis Mancini, Chairman 
Theodore Patrikis 
Timothy Davern 
Marguerite Cunningham 

The Annual Town Census was conducted by mail in conjunction 
with the Federal Census held in April of this year. As areas are listed 
by blocks and tracts, population was broken down in a different way 
than by precincts. The total population rendered to the Federal Census 
Bureau was 13,464 town residents at this time. 

Town Election 
April 24, 1990 

The annual Town Election was held on the fourth Tuesday of 
April, set by the General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott. At 
the instruction of the Board of Selectmen, the polls were open from 
7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. to act of the following: 

To choose a Moderator for one Year (1 Year) 
To choose Five members of the Board of Selectmen for one Year 
(1 Year) 

To choose One member of the Board of Assesors for three Years 
(3 Years) 

To choose One member of the Board of Public Works for three 
Years (3 Years) 

To choose Two members of the School Committee for three Years 
(3 Years) 

To choose One member of the Trustees of the Public Library for 

three Years (3 Years) 
To choose One member of the Board of Health for three Years 

(3 Years) 

To choose One member of the Planning Board for five Years (5 
Years) 

To choose One member of the Swampscott Housing Authority 

for five Years (5 Years) 
To choose One Commissioner of Trust Funds for three Years (3 

Years) 

To choose Nine Members of the Charter Commission 

To choose Eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the 

six precincts for three Years (3 Years) — See Town Clerk for 

results of Election 



110 



At the close of the election, Town Meeting will adjourn to Monday, 
April 30, 1990, at 7:45 P.M. at the Juh.v^r High School Auditorium. 

The total registered voters at the close of registration on April 
4. 1990 was 9258. The precinct count as follows: 

Precinct One 1576 

Two 1476 

Three 1516 

Four 1606 

Five 1529 

Six 1555 

Total 9258 

The total votes cast were as follows: 

Precinct One 715 

Two 676 

Three 649 

Four 737 

Five 740 
Six 

Total 4264 

This total represents 46.5% of the total registered voters. Absentee 
ballots were 222. 



Precinct 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total 

Moderator (1 Year) 



Martin C. Goldman 


470 


399 


405 


458 


465 


520 


2717 


electmen (1 Year) 5 Elected 
















Eva Peretsman 


242 


182 


193 


226 


231 


164 


1238 


James Rudolph 


331 


270 


241 


333 


408 


495 


2078 


Thomas DriscoU 


285 


343 


364 


331 


270 


286 


1879 


Daniel Santanello 


365 


333 


351 


455 


393 


423 


2320 


Chris Drucas 


307 


302 


280 


335 


360 


372 


1956 


Peter Beatrice 


260 


294 


282 


298 


312 


316 


1762 


Robert Perry 


444 


404 


433 


397 


348 


333 


2359 


Clinton Guy, Jr. 


91 


103 


119 


135 


144 


98 


690 


card of Assessors (3 Years) 
















Vera Harrington 


498 


459 


474 


475 


464 


486 


2856 



111 



Board of Public Works (3 Years) 

David Phillips 406 403 404 435 446 487 2581 



School Committee (3 Years) 2 Elected 



Edward Palleschi 


335 


311 


328 


318 


270 


263 


1825 


Robert Ingram 


230 


281 


309 


355 


368 


369 


1912 


Eva Peretsman 


212 


154 


157 


196 


197 


126 


1042 


Richard Feinberg 


318 


321 


258 


325 


346 


439 


2007 


rustee of Public Library (3 Years) 












Thomas Cesarz 


430 


398 


404 


442 


503 2626 




Dard of Health (3 Years) 1 Elected 












Ann Greenbaum 


182 


180 


187 


165 


211 


196 


1121 


Eugene Nigrelli 


205 


100 


149 


173 


112 


169 


908 


Eva Peretsman 


122 


88 


92 


125 


135 


85 


647 


Peter Barker 


73 


184 


97 


84 


113 


120 


671 


Arthur Freedman 


67 


54 


63 


123 


96 


93 


496 



Planning Board (5 Years) 1 Elected 

Matthew Leahy 261 290 253 232 229 220 1485 

John V. Phelan III 246 238 263 353 318 318 1736 



Swampscott Housing Authority (5 Years) 

Barbara Eldridge 414 399 416 419 408 441 2497 

Commissioner of Trust Funds (3 Years) 

Louis Gallo 456 430 446 462 470 490 2754 



Charter Commission — Elect (9) Nine 



Brian Murphy 


217 


222 


234 


288 


239 


245 


1445 


Catherine Woods 


191 


184 


248 


268 


215 


206 


1312 


Geoffrey Wermuth 


89 


97 


110 


106 


112 


135 


649 


Robert Donelan 


262 


302 


308 


342 


330 


269 


1813 


Kathleen Magee 


142 


127 


208 


171 


159 


171 


978 


Lawrence Greenbaum 


313 


284 


271 


279 


340 


380 


1867 


Thomas Driscoll, Jr 


298 


331 


348 


294 


295 


302 


1868 


Clinton Guy, Jr. 


150 


147 


186 


179 


191 


164 


1017 


Brian Drummond 


96 


116 


155 


191 


137 


124 


819 


Eva Peretsman 


238 


207 


204 


230 


230 


182 


1291 


Francis Cassidy 


223 


265 


262 3338 


274 


282 


1644 


Bruce Chesley 


59 


55 


84 


46 


69 


74 


387 


Vera Harrington 


288 


233 


247 


252 


261 


254 


1535 


Douglas Allen 


215 


234 


263 


280 


287 


340 


1619 


William DiMento 


244 


274 


264 


358 


307 


346 


1793 



112 



There were eight (8) questions on the Ballot for April 24, 1990 
as follows: 

Question #1 — Shall the Town vote to revise its present Charter and 
elect nine (9) Charter Commission Members? 

Yes: 2160 No: 1074 

Question #2 — Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to exempt 
from the provisions of Prop. 2^, so called, the amounts required to 
pay for the bond issued in order to fund the expenses and costs 
connected with the construction of sewerage treatment and sewerage 
disposal facilities and appurtenances thereto? 

Yes: 1980 No: 1470 

Question #3 — Shall the Town vote to accept the proposed trash 
collection fee? Non-binding 

Yes: 1469 No: 1883 

Question #4 — In the event that the trash collection fee is rejected, 
shall the Town be required to refund such fees, without interest, to 
all persons who have the fee? Non-binding, 

Yes: 2059 No: 1224 

Question #5 — Should the Town fund and support its Public Library 
at $227,000, the minimum needed, to keep the library open without 
depending on an override vote? Non-binding. 

Yes: 2743 No: 623 

Question #6 — Shall the Fire Chiefs position be removed from Civil 
Service? Non-binding. 

Yes: 659 No: 2588 

Question #7 — Do you oppose further cuts or withholding of local 
aid? Non-binding. 

Yes: 2083 No: 1146 

Question #8 — Should the State share 40% of its revenue from growth 
taxes, with towns and cities on a continuing and consistent basis to 
help support basic local services? Non-binding. 

Yes: 2855 No: 372 



113 



Special Town Election 

June 19, 1990 



The Board of Selectmen set the hours for the Special Town Election 
to be held on June 19, 1990 as 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the purpose 
as follows: 

Question #1 — Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to assess 
an additional $1,837,000. in real estate and personal property taxes 
for the purposes of funding expenditures for Public Schools, Police 
Department, Fire Department, Public Works and other Town 
Departments for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1990, under the 
contingent portion of the Town's annual budget. 

The total registered voters at the close of registration on June 
2, 1990, was 8939. The precinct count as follows: 



Precinct One 


1532 


Two 


1422 


Three 


1462 


Four 


1545 


Five 


1469 


Six 


1509 


Total 


8939 



The total votes were cast as follows: 
Total voter turnout was 56%. 







Yes 


No 


Precinct One 


721 


262 


443 


Two 


802 


419 


376 


Three 


727 


382 


339 


Four 


969 


537 


418 


Five 


896 


437 


456 


Six 


924 


547 


369 


Total 


5039 


2584 


2401 



Absentee ballots cast were 230. 

This was the year for the Federal Census, beginning in April, 
1990. All information was compiled and sent to the Census Bureau. 
This was done thru August, 1990. This report consisted of Housing 
Units, Special places, population census count of residents on each 
Street and Electric Co. information. This has been compiled by tracts 
and blocks of the Town of Swampscott and is available in the Election 
Commission office for use by Real Estate Brokers and other interested 
parties. 



114 



State Primary 

Tuesday, September 18, 1990 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the nomination of 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

U.S. Senator for the Commonwealth 

Governor and Lt. Governor for the Commonwealth 

Attorney General for the Commonwealth 

Secretary for the Commonwealth 

Treasurer for the Commonwealth 

Auditor for the Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress for the Sixth Congressional District 
Councillor for the Fifth Councillor District 
Senator in General Court for the First Senatorial District 
Representative in General Court for the Eighth Representative 
District 

District Attorney for the Eastern District 
Register of Probate for Essex County 
County Treasurer for Essex County 
County Commissioner for Essex County 



The following Democratic voters cast their ballots: 

Precinct One 663 

Two 582 

Three 541 

Four 642 

Five 618 

Six 626 

Total 3672 



Absentee ballots cast were 125. 



Democratic Ballot 



Precinct 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total 

Senator in Congress 

John Kerry 463 412 397 425 430 418 2545 

Governor 

F. X. Bellotti 250 192 212 248 219 223 1344 

E. F. Murphy (Candidate 

withdrew) 14 13 8 11 11 9 66 

JohnSilber 383 358 310 366 364 374 2155 



115 



Lt. Governor 
M. 0. Clapprood 
Wm. B. Golden 
N. A. Paleologos 

Attorney General 
James M. Shannon 
L. Scott Harshbarger 

Secretary of State 
M. J. Connolly 

Treasurer 
W. F. Galvin 
Geo. Keverian 
Dick Kraus 

Auditor 

A. J. DeNucci 



326 


280 


281 


336 


284 


289 


1796 


168 


136 


120 


142 


148 


156 


870 


91 


87 


74 


73 


83 


76 


4.84 


268 


243 


239 


250 


260 


214 


1474 


342 


283 


248 


344 


307 


361 


1885 


389 


346 


322 


360 


333 


361 


21 11 

4U X. i. L 


258 


248 


226 


265 


240 


246 


1483 


190 


150 


132 


162 


172 


155 


961 


136 


98 


107 


139 


110 


124 


714 



394 337 331 358 327 371 
452 491 



Repr. in Congress — 6th Distr. 

Nick Mavroules 529 436 406 457 

Councillor — 5th Distr. 

J, F. Markey 322 258 222 274 265 327 

Vincent A. Raponi 178 156 164 165 152 118 

Senator in General Court — 1st Essex 

Walter J. Boverini 445 392 357 298 381 416 

Representative in General Court — 8th Essex 



M. J. Beatrice 


162 


207 


159 


181 


176 


145 


1030 


L. Greenbaum 


255 


60 


160 


155 


191 


163 


1084 


D. P. Kelly, Sr. 


30 


27 


37 


17 


20 


12 


143 


Eva Peretsman 


71 


54 


59 


72 


68 


55 


379 


Douglas W. Petersen 


122 


110 


100 


197 


148 


230 


907 


District Attorney 
















Kevin M. Burke 


442 


385 


347 


398 


381 


404 


2357 


Register of Probate — - 


Essex County 












P. M. Blanchette 


69 


56 


56 


59 


70 


67 


377 


Carmen J. Ciampa 


87 


49 


52 


65 


68 


43 


364 


James F. X. Doherty 


101 


70 


82 


93 


77 


91 


514 


P. J. McManus 


220 


247 


214 


232 


184 


178 


1275 


County Treasurer 
















Katherine O'Leary 


411 


355 


317 


354 


319 


346 


2102 


County Commissioner 
















Charles T. Arena 


338 


274 


271 


304 


285 


287 


1759 


Christie Ciampa, Jr. 


156 


145 


142 


144 


125 


112 


824 



116 



Republican Ballot 

The following Republican voters cast their ballots: 

Precinct One 270 

Two 254 

Three 260 

Four 262 

Five 303 

Six 321 

Total 1670 



Absentee Ballots cast were 75. 



Precinct 

Senator in Congress 
D. S. Daly 
•Tim RannaDnrt 


1 

64 
174 


2 

60 
164 


3 

65 
154 


4 

67 
163 


5 

71 
200 


6 

84 
187 


Total 

411 
1042 


Governor 

Steven D. Pierce 
Wm. F. Weld 


76 
187 


97 
151 


95 
160 


87 
173 


89 
211 


76 
241 


520 
1123 


I^t Governor 
A. Paul Cellucci 
P. G. Torkildsen 


99 
141 


87 
141 


81 
149 


91 
140 


127 
145 


117 
142 


602 
858 


Attorney General 

Guy A. Carbone 
Wm. C. Sawyer 


96 
120 


95 
110 


79 
118 


89 
122 


111 
130 


112 
131 


582 
731 


Secretary of State 

Paul McCarthy 


166 


172 


172 


162 


200 


210 


1082 


Treasurer 

Jos. D. Malone 


206 


191 


205 


196 


236 


237 


1271 


Auditor 

Douglas J. Murray 


167 


155 


171 


159 


195 


201 


1048 


Representative in Congress 
Edgar L. Kelley 


— 6th District 
166 161 171 


167 


193 


194 


1052 


Councillor — 5th Distr. 
J. P. Harris 


167 


143 


166 


155 


190 


175 


996 


Senator in General Court — 

R. L. Pinch 


1st Essex 
162 146 


169 


161 


182 


196 


1016 



117 



Representative in General Court — 8th Essex 

M.L.Jones 68 71 60 75 84 69 427 

Monica S. Staaf 135 134 132 136 157 137 831 



District Attorney 

None 

Register of Probate — Essex County 

E.C.Hudson 162 153 169 158 188 201 1031 

County Treasurer 

George K. Mazareas 172 144 163 161 188 188 1016 

County Commissioner 

Kevin J. Leach 166 147 167 160 189 205 1034 

The total number of registered voters for the State Primary was 
9183. The total voter turnout was 5342, this was 57.8%. 



Federal and State Election 

November 6, 1990 

The Board of Selectmen voted to set the polling hours for the 
State Election to be held on November 6, 1990, from 7:00 A.M. to 
8:00 P.M. 

The voters of the Town of Swampscott will cast their votes for 
the following: 

U.S. Senator for the Commonwealth 

Governor and Lt. Governor for the Commonwealth 

Attorney General for the Commonwealth 

Secretary for the Commonwealth 

Treasurer for the Commonwealth 

Auditor for the Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress for the 6th Congressional District 
Councillor for the 5th Councillor District 
Senator in General Court for the 8th Senatorial District 
Representative in General Court for the 8th Representative 
District 

District Attorney for the Eastern District 
Register of Probate for Essex County 
County Treasurer for Essex County 
County Commissioner for Essex County 



118 



Questions 



#1 — Abolishing the state Census 

#2 — Restricting use of state consultants 

#3 — Changing laws concerning state taxes and fees 

#4 — Changing requirements for political parties and candidates 

#5 — Allocating state aid to cities and towns 

#6 — Free and equal broadcast time for candidates 



#7 — Abolishing the elected office of County Commissioner and 
Treasurer 

The total number of registered voters at the close of registration 
on October 9, 1990 was 9439. Breakdown as follows: 

Precinct One 1638 



The total number of registered voters who cast their votes in this 
election was 7278. This was 77% of the registered voters. There was 
a total of 461 Absentee Ballots. 



Precinct One 1259 

Two 1190 

Three 1104 

Four 1254 

Five 1219 

Six 1252 

Total 7278 



Local and Public Policy Question 



Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 



1488 
1567 
1631 
1568 
1547 



Total 



9439 



Precinct 

Senator in Congress 



1 



2 



3 



4 



5 



6 Total 



John Kerry 



739 689 663 746 703 729 4269 
485 452 404 449 482 487 2759 



Jim Rappaport 



Governor and Lt. Governor 

Silber & Clapprood 
Weld & Cellucci 
Umina & Deberry 



609 573 536 595 536 523 3372 
601 564 521 612 636 684 3618 
26 23 16 20 21 21 127 



119 



Attorney General 



Tj Snntt Harshharcer 


843 


783 


716 


817 


791 


850 


4800 


VV 111. \y, >0<*W^Ci 


325 


327 


321 


352 


367 


328 


2020 


Secretary of State 
















Michael J. Connolly 


coo 

523 


516 


A on 

483 


540 


473 


r" r\ n 

523 


3058 


Paul MrCarthv 


391 


397 


378 


406 


442 
T ^ fad 


415 


2429 


R P Ahparn 


206 


156 


141 

X^ X 


177 

X 1 f 


197 

X 1/ 1 


175 


1052 


Treasurer 
















TXT" T7^ 1 * 

Wm. F. Galvin 


400 


383 


402 


379 


341 


361 


2266 


.Trm D IVTalnrip 


722 


688 


593 


754 


768 


763 


4288 


C D Nash 


69 


46 


49 


53 


56 


51 


324 


Auditor 
















A. Jos. DeNucci 


675 


656 


616 


675 


596 


646 


3864 


Douglas J. Murray 


325 


329 


302 


357 


400 


374 


2087 


S K Sherman 


119 


69 


66 


70 


102 


79 


505 


Representative in Congress 


— 6th District 










NipU" IVTfi vvnnlpci 

li lUrV iVx Ct V I. U UlCo 


953 


859 


751 


849 


858 


911 

1/ X X 


5181 


FlHcrarTi TCpHpv 

l^\Jlf^C*>L XJ. XjLdlv^J' 


262 


274 


281 


314 

<J x^ 


318 


283 


1732 


Councillor — 5th District 
















Tnhn P MnrUpv 


627 


582 


523 


573 


547 


573 


S425 


.Tnhn P 

Vjllli X . XXCVI I lO 


452 


423 


413 


452 


508 


475 


2723 


Senator in General Court — 


1st Essex 












Walter J. Boverini 


729 


680 


624 


711 


686 


689 


4119 


Randall L. Pinch 


412 


392 


368 


407 


437 


423 


2439 


Representative in General Court - 


- 8th Essex 








Douglas Petersen 


636 


629 


539 


642 


603 


ri r~r r\ 

670 


3719 


Monica S. Staaf 


454 


423 


443 


469 


499 


487 


2775 


Don Rousseau 


63 


52 


49 


65 


48 


40 


317 


District Attorney 
















Kevin M. Burke 


856 


802 


746 


782 


794 


805 


4785 


Register of Probate — Essex County 












Peter Blanchette 


518 


468 


467 


472 


416 


464 


2805 


Everett C. Hudson 


478 


456 


437 


498 


557 


491 


2917 


County Treasurer 
















Katherine O'Leary 


567 


502 


522 


580 


498 


502 


3171 


George K. Mazareas 


488 


490 


418 


452 


540 


539 


2927 


County Commissioner 
















Chas. T. Arena 


549 


488 


487 


541 


495 


467 


3027 


Kevin J. Leach 


496 


441 


434 


477 


550 


520 


2918 



120 



Question #1 

Abolishing the State Census 

Yes 921 910 826 974 938 974 5543 

No 225 190 194 188 171 190 1158 

Question #2 

Restricting use of State Consultants 

Yes 519 491 410 455 474 469 2818 

No 648 631 627 722 671 718 4017 

Question #3 

Changing laws concerning state taxes and fees 

Yes 563 482 419 487 560 520 3031 

No 627 656 635 724 602 688 3932 

Question #4 

Changing requirements for political parties and candidates 

Yes 534 531 480 557 537 524 3163 

No 551 534 516 583 547 600 3331 

Question #5 

Allocating state aid to cities and towns 

Yes 676 637 576 627 691 680 3887 

No 409 419 411 498 390 437 2564 

Question #6 

Free and equal broadcast time for candidates 

Yes 515 456 459 526 482 478 2916 

No 471 514 445 524 515 546 3015 

Question #7 — Local and Public Policy Question 

Abolishing the elected office of County Commissioner and 

Treasurer 

Yes 638 582 517 622 641 644 3644 

No 349 349 352 366 309 347 2072 



The four member Board of Election Commissioners meets on one 
Tuesday of the month, according to their schedules. They discuss voter 
registration, elections, laws relating to elections, conditions of the 
voting machines at time of the elections, etc. This year Sequoia Pacific 
sent their technicians to repair the machines whenever they could. 
They repaired several machines and they were in acceptable shape 
for all elections this year. This year was the first year the Street 
Directory of Residents over 17 was not printed because of lack of 
funds. There had been several requests for this book. This year the 
voting polls used computer lists for their poll sheets which were run 
off by the computer in the Election Office. This seemed to eliminate 
a lot of trouble for the workers at the polls at time of the elections. 
Input of over 9,000 names were typed into the computer and this 
was done over a period of a few months. We are hopeful the computer 
will be of much more use in the future and this seems to be the coming 
thing for the elections office. 



121 



Fire Department 



William R. Hyde, Chief 

The following is the report of the Fire Chief for the year 1990: 

During the year 1990, this department answered a total of 1062 
alarms. Of these alarms, 42 were building fires, 20 were traffic 
accidents, 214 were medical aids. The remainder of these calls included 
lockouts, false alarms, mutual aid runs to other cities and towns, 
electrical fires, chimney fires, oil burner fires, details and 
miscellaneous incidents. We inspected and issued 43 permits for oil 
burners. There were 163 parcels of property inspected for smoke 
detectors. The law requires that all new homes be inspected for smoke 
detectors and also homes that are being sold. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus of this department continues to be in excellent 
operating condition thanks to the conscientious work of our mechanic 
Bob Pierro. Bob is one of the most respected mechanics in the Fire 
Service. I wish to thank Bob on behalf of the Town for his dedication. 

Fire Drills and Inspections 

Fire drills were conducted at all schools during the year 1990. 
Fire drills are conducted shortly after school opens in September, 
during Fire Prevention Week and other times throughout the year. 
These drills are conducted in an orderly and efficient manner under 
the supervision of my Officers. I would like to commend as usual, 
the principals and faculty for their help during these drills. All fire 
alarm systems are checked in the schools by the electrical inspector 
and members of this department prior to the September opening. All 
systems were found to be in proper working condition. Fire drills 
were also performed in accordance with the law at the Jewish 
Rehabilitation Center for the aged, and all buildings under the 
supervision of the Greater Lynn Mental Health. All mercantile, public 
and other buildings under our control have been inspected in 
accordance with the law. Inspection of property is a valuable part 
of the fire service and we of the Fire Service are more than happy 
to do our part in this most important work. Citizens of Swampscott 
are urged to contact their fire department for suggestions on fire 
prevention and fire safety. The number to call is 595-4050. 



122 



Fire Alarm System 



The Fire Alalrm System is maintained by the Town Electrical 
Inspector. Overhead wiring is still needed in some parts of the town. 
Each year for the past few years, the Town Meeting has voted a sum 
of money for the electrical inspector to perform the necessary work 
on the system as required to keep it up to code. I am in hopes that 
this program will continue in order to give the citizens the best possible 
protection. Fire alarm boxes are important and all residents should 
know the location of the fire alarm box nearest to their home. The 
box can be used to summon help immediately for any type of 
emergency. The fire alarm box is not limited to fire related incidents, 
but can be used to summon help for medical aids, automobile fires 
and accidents and similar incidents requiring the fire and police. 
Anyone not familiar with the fire alarm box operation, should call 
the fire department for instructions in its use. Do not hesitate to use 
the fire alarm box if necessary. 

Personnel 

There has been no changes in personnel of this department during 
the year 1990. During fire prevention week this year, Tim Sweeney 
and Remo Zimbaldi organized a program for the children and adults. 
Demonstrations were given of the various equipment and the children 
were treated with goodies that were made by the firefighters wives 
and also from donations by Joe Newman of Newmans bakery. The 
program was a complete success and the cooperation of the school 
principals and the teachers made it even more of a success. Both Tim 
and Remo were given letters of commendations and they were also 
recognized by the Board of Selectmen. I would like to express my 
sincere appreciation to Tim, Remo and all who helped. We are looking 
forward to next year. 

Recommendations 

I recommend the appointment of a Deputy Chief. 

I recommend the appointment of additional personnel. 

I recommend the appointment of a fire prevention officer. 

I recommend the replacing of fire alarm boxes throughout Town 
as needed. 



123 



I recommend a program of replacing fire department vehicles 
on a regular basis. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Commitee, Town Meeting Members, all Town 
departments and especially to the Officer's and Firefighters of my 
own department for their cooperation during the year 1990. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William R. Hyde 
Chief of Department 

Forest Warden 

The following is the report of the Forest Warden for the year 
1990: During the year 1990, this department issued 11 burning permits 
to the residents of Swampscott. This was done in accordance with 
the law which permits open burning during the period January 15 
through May 1. This burning to consist of open burning of products 
of open space land husbandry and management, including materials 
commonly referred to as brush including vegetation such as tree 
branches, brush, cane, driftwood and other forestry debris but 
excluding grass, hay or leaves. The permit for such burning to be 
be obtained from the Head of the Fire Department. 

Such burning shall be performed in accordance with the following 
requirements; a) without causing a nuisance, b) with smoke minimizing 
starters if starters are necessary, c) between the hours of ten o'clock 
in the morning until four o'clock in the afternoon, d) on land proximate 
to the place of generation of such products or at such place as may 
be designated in the permit. 

Violations shall be punishable by a fine of not more than fifty 
dollars per day, and each day's violation shall constitute a separate 
offense. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

William R. Hyde 
Chief of Department 



124 



Swampscott Rotary Fourth of July Committee 

Our Town's 1990 Fourth of July Celebration went off successfully 
due to the tremendous effort of many townspeople. Nancy Garden, 
Sandi Santanello, Rick Wood, Ernie Mazola, and the members of the 
Swampscott Rotary Club deserve special recognition. Without their 
efforts, our Town's festivities would not have been possible. 

A total of $24,785.18 was collected from residents and businesses. 
This left us with a balance of approximately $3,000.00 to be used 
for the printing and mailing for 1991. 

Major expenses were: 



Harbormaster 

Lawrence P. Bithell, Harbormaster 

Assistants: 
Roger Bruley 
John Cawley 
William Hennessey 
Donald Peterson 



Because Swampscott's coastal environment remains its most 
valuable asset, boating continues to ba a very popular form of recreation 
within the community. In addition, since the sea bordering the Town 
is rich in fish and lobster, significant commercial boating activity 
emanates from Swampscott Harbor. 

In all, nearly one hundred eighty boats were moored in Town 
waters in 1990. 

The Harbormaster's Department functions to assist boaters of the 
community by providing a broad range of services. Those services 
include recommendations for mooring specifications, location of 
moorings, and management of the permit system, enforcement of 



Fireworks 

Printing & Postage 
Police Coverage . . . 
Parade/Concert . . . 
Total 



$16,590.00 
..4,036.48 
..2,688.00 
..2,179.00 
.24,293.48 



Very Sincerely, 



Andy Hansen 



125 



boating regulations on Swampscott waters, rescues as needs arise and, 
in general, seeing to it that boating in Swampscott remains a safe 
and pleasurable pastime. 

The department also secures and maintains all equipment 
necessary to accomplish the services provided. Along those lines, in 
1990, the eight year old engine for the town boat was replaced. A 
new 120 horsepower Evinrude outboard motor was placed into service. 
It functioned well and it should continue to provide efficient, reliable 
service for years to come. 

As in past years, your harbormaster and several assistants are 
active members of the Massachusetts Harbormasters Association. 
Through the MHA, we attend meetings and seminars designed to 
keep us abreast of the latest methods for providing optimum service 
to the boating community. We continue to maintain and enhance 
associations with neighboring harbormasters, with the Massachusetts 
Environmental Police, and with the United States Coast Guard as 
well as with the Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management organization 
all of which considerably benefit Swampscott boaters. 

Historians may record that 1990 was the year of one of the worst 
coastal storms in memory. On December 4th, during the astrological 
condition of perigee, tides were at their most extreme levels in more 
than sixty years. This, coupled with severe southeasterly winds, caused 
considerable damage to Swampscott's south facing beaches and seawalls 
and one commercial boat was destroyed having been cast upon the 
rocks at Fishermans Beach. Fortunately, few boats remained in the 
water at that time. Most fishermen heeded forecasts and took their 
vessels to more sheltered waters until the tides and weather abated. 

Remaining highest on the harbormaster's list of priorities is harbor 
dredging. Conditions within the anchorage at Swampscott Harbor are 
currently marginal, especially for the larger commercial boats. 

As in past years, we wish to extend appreciation to the Public 
Works, Police, and Fire Departments as well as to the Finance 
Committee, to Town Meeting, and to the Board of Selectmen for their 
support of the Harbormaster's objectives. To recently retired assistant 
harbormasters, Michael Gambale and William Guay, thanks also for 
so may years of fine service. Finally, to the Swampscott boaters whom 
we serve, your cooperation and support are most appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence P. Bithell 
Swampscott Harbormaster 



126 



Swampscott Housing Authority 



Michael A. Palleschi, Chairman 
Barbara F. Eldridge, Vice-Chairman 
Albert DiLisio, Member 
John F. O'Hare, Member 
Mark N. Thomas, Executive Director and Secretary 

The office of the Authority is located at 6 Duncan Terrace and 
is open daily to the public from 8:30 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. Monday through 
Friday. Regular and Special Meetings are held as often as necessary 
to carry out the business of the Authority. The Annual Election of 
Officers is held on the third Wednesday following the Annual Town 
Election. 

The Authority was established in 1948 and is an independent 
corporation from the Town. The Authority has five Members, four 
are elected by the voters of the Town of Swampscott and the fifth 
member is appointed by the Secretary, of the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development. 

Information with regard to Admission, Continued Occupancy 
Limits and Eligibility Requirements for both types of housing in the 
Town can be obtained by calling the Authority Office at 593-5516 
or calling in person during business hours. 

All Rules and Regulations pertaining to Public Housing are on 
file for inspection by the public. 

200-1 The vinyl siding modernization project for the nine buildings 
at Cherry Street and Cherry Court began on December 3, 1990. It 
will be completed by the end of January, 1991 after three years of 
work by the Board Members to obtain the funding. The future plans 
of the Board Members is to obtain funding from the State for financial 
assistance in establishing a Day Care Center, so the single parents 
in family housing will have the opportunity to participate in one of 
the many State's Job Training Programs. 

667-C The Board Members are still working on funding from 
the State for the much needed Laundry Room at the Doherty Circle 
Complex. The Board Members will not deter in their efforts. The 
Housing Authority is still vigorously looking for financing for much 
needed additional family and elderly housing. 

The five Board Members and the Executive Director of the 
Swampscott Housing Authority would like to express their 
appreciation to the Board of Selectmen and the Board of Appeals 
for their support and interest. 



127 



Board of Health 



Gene Nigrelli, Chairman 
Ann Greenbaum, R.N., M.S.W. 

Peter Barker, M.D. 
Kent F. Murphy, Health Officer 

This year was a busy year for your Board of Health. Two Board 
Members resigned due to pressing medical practices. Dr. Steven 
Lefkowitz, who has served since 1984, resigned due to his very active 
and pressing duties as a Cardiologist. Dr. Theodore Dushan, having 
served as a Board of Health member and Board Physician since 1977, 
resigned due to his pressing practice as a Pediatrician. He remains 
as a Board of Health Physician, and was joined in those duties by 
newly appointed Board Member, Dr. Peter Barker. 

Chairman Robert Murphy chose not to run for re-election after 
having served since 1976. Robert Murphy stayed on as an appointed 
member and Chairman of the Recycling Committee. A Committee 
he, and other members of the Board of Health, began, and a program 
he promoted. 

We wish to thank Robert Murphy, Dr. Theodore Dushan and Dr. 
Steven Lefkowitz for their many years of service on the Board of Health 
for the Town of Swampscott. 

Mrs. Ann Greenbaum, R.N., M.S.W., the High School and Middle 
School Nurse and previous Board of Health Public Health Nurse, was 
elected to the Board of Health this year. Dr. Peter Barker and Gene 
Nigrelli were appointed in joint conference with the Board of Selectmen 
and the one member of the Board of Health. 

This year 148 deaths were reported to the Health Department. 
The leading causes of death were: heart problems, 66; cancer, 24; 
pulmonary-lung, 22; C.V.A., 15; gastro-intesinal, 6; alzheimer's, 5; 
kidney-urinary, 5; diabetes, 2; suicide, 2; anemia, 1. There were 130 
births reported this year. 

This past fiscal year the previous Board of Health had, at the 
request of the Finance Committee and the majority of the Board of 
Selectmen, instituted a rubbish fee system of $52.50 per dwelling unit. 
This was not an easy task, however, it did generate the money needed 
by the Finance Committee. Thanks to the override, the rubbish fee 
system was dropped. 



128 



Recycling was a major interest this past year. The Board of Health 
appointed a Recycling Committee in November, 1989. Since that time 
the Board has expanded to include the following members: Alice 
Winston, Gene Nigrelli, Daniel Santanello, Kevin Gk)okin, Mrs. Ann 
Greenbaiim, Sarah Ingalls, Nelson Kessler, Peter Barker, MD, Jeffrey 
Yoffa, Alex Souppa, Kent Murphy, Barbara Jaslow Schaefer, Nicole 
Higgens, Samantha Young, Claudia Luck, Robert Murphy Chairs this 
very active committee. The first Recycling Center, at the old Water 
Yard, Pine St., was abandoned because of neighborhood objections. 

! The present drop off center at the Swampscott Waste Water Treatment 
Plant, Humphrey St., is very successful. We have recycled 167 tons 
of newspaper, 40 tons of white metals, 20 cubic yards of tin cans, 
8 tons of glass and many containers of returnables. The recycling 
Committee and the Board of Health have spent $1,476.38 for supplies, 
$1,925.00 in transportation, received $978.33 in sales of recyclables, 
$3,708.97 saved at Resco and, as of December 13, have a net savings 
of $1,285.92. We have successfully reduced our tonnage by 243 tons 

! this year at a savings of approximately $6,000.00. 

Our rubbish collection contract with Hiltz Co., expires on June 
30, 1991. We will go out to bid for a new contract this winter and 
will include an addendum for curbside recycling to advance our 
percentage of tonnage reduction from our rubbish collection tonnage. 

The consortium of 13 communities who contract with, and use, 
Resco agreed to hire the law firm of Palmer & Dodge, the engineering 
firm of Camp Dresser & McKee to enforce our present contract and 
prevent Resco from charging exorbitant prices. This action has held 
the disposal cost down for the past two years. 

Our Alcohol & Drug Program i.e. "A Sequel to Adolescents Just 
j Don't Happen" will be presented again this year, being funded and 
co-sponsored by the Swampscott Rotary with the cooperation of the 
I Swampscott School Department. We are indebted to the Swampscott 
Rotary for totally funding the very successful program two years ago 
and thank them for committing to this year's program. Attendance 
at last year's program was over two hundred people per night for 
six nights. Again our thanks to the Rotary. We are especially 
appreciative of Dr. Theodore Dushan for putting this program on. 

Our clerk. Bertha Hardy, retired and we wish her long health 
and happiness in retirement and welcome our new clerk, Diane 
Erickson. 

The Annual Flu Clinics were well attended this year. The first 
clinic was greatly received. A total of 820 vaccines were given. St. 



129 



John the Evangelist Church again donated the use of its new school 
hall on Humphrey St. Thank you St. Johns. We are also indebted 
to the following volunteers: Dr. Peter Barker, M.D., Phyllis Connolly, 
R.N., Martha Morcou, R.N., Joan Fried, R.N., Joanne Massey, R.N., 
Ruth Epstein, R.N., Leslie Breen, R.N., Joan Myers, R.N. Ann 
Greenbaum, R.N., Barbara Eldridge, Dorothy Stemniski, Marion 
Gonsalves, Marjorie Macajone, Sally Abbruzzi, Carol Dedrick, Paul 
DiBesse, without whose help the clinics would not be feasible. Again, 
thank you volunteers. We also gave 120 pneumonia inoculations, 
passing the cost of the vaccine through to the recipients. There were 
six clinics held this year. 

Blood lead screening were offered at all six Day Care Centers 
that are licensed by the Town as well as four Kindergartens. All tests 
were within normal limits. We also provide health service, licensing 
and inspection to these six licensed Day Care Centers. 

Our Public Health Nurse, Joan Myers, also conducts blood 
pressure screening for seniors at the Senior Citizen Center, made home 
visits, conducted dental clinics, and in cooperation with school nurses, 
conducted immunization clinics. 

Dr. Arthur A. Barry, DVM, again put on our rabies clinic in 
the Spring. A total of 86 animals were given a rabies shot. 

Our bathing beach testing went reasonably well this year. Kings 
Beach was polluted twice and closed twice this past summer. It is 
hoped that the inflow infiltration corrections will abate these beach 
pollution problems as part of the Lynn Sewer Connection. 

Sacurd Way Subdivision has been a concern for the Board of 
Health and was recommended denial in Land Court, because it would 
exacerbate an already poor drainage problem. A decision is expected 
shortly. 

We wish to thank all departments, boards and committees and 
many private citizens who help make our programs possible. 



130 



Inspector of Wires 



Daniel C. Cahill 

Administrative Assistant: 
Helen M. Collins 

I hereby submit the following report for 1990: 

The office of the Inspector of Wires issued 264 permits for various 
electrical work during the year. 

Fees collected were $11,548.57 

Permits were issued for new and old work, changes of service 
and installations for residential, commercial and municipal needs. 

Work is nearly 95% completed at the Shipswatch Project on 
Humphrey Street. 

During the year, the inspector was a member of the Field House 
Renovation Committee and inspected all electrical work at the facility. 

This department and the personnel from the Swampscott Fire 
Department work together in inspection of fire alarm systems in public 
buildings. Plans are approved and inspections done of sprinkler 
systems in conjunction with the Fire Department. 

Routine and emergency calls and inspections are done on a daily 
basis throughout the year. Office hours for the inspector are 5 to 6 
p.m. Monday through Thursday. Permits may be obtained in the 
Building Department office Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
until noon. 

Messages and requests for inspection are taken in the Building 
Department weekdays from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. 



131 



Swampscott Historical Commission 



In the past year, the Commission processed seven Site Plan Review 
applications as required by the Town of Swampscott Zoning By-Laws. 
We also answered a multitude of requests for information on or about 
the Town, its inhabitants or specific buildings and areas. 

The Commission also voted to hold our regular meetings on the 
first Monday of the month and to move the meetings to Swampscott 
High School. 

Commission members received notice that the Swampscott 
Historical Society building at 99 Paradise Road has been placed on 
the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service. 
Appropriately, the Commission placed a bronze plaque on the house 
in December. 

The Commission acquired a series of 10 small lithographs of the 
New Ocean House Hotel for the Town's collections of historical 
material. Several other photos and articles were also donated to us. 

Louis A. Gallo, Chairman, attended the US Department of 
Interior's hearings in Salem and Haverill on the "Salem Project" to 
encourage tourism in Essex County. Gallo also serves as the 
Commission's representative on the Fish House Study Committee. 

The Historical Commission has voted to support the efforts of 
the Church of the Holy Name (Episcopal) to have their building placed 
on the National Register. As to this effort the chairman spent several 
hours touring the Town with the Director of Historical Surveys from 
the Office of the Massachusetts Secretary of State. The Commission 
is doing a survey of the "Swampscott Land Trust" subdivision by 
Frederick Law Olmsted. 

The need for a complete survey of the entire Town's assests has 
prompted us to sponsor an article in the 1991 Town Meeting Warrant 
seeking matching funds for a state grant to accomplish this survey. 

Jack Butterworth was appointed chairman of a sub-committee 
to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Walter Brennan's birthday, July 
25, 1994. 

We wish to thank Howard Vatcher for the extremely detailed 
wooden model of a Swampscott sailing dory which showcased our 
display on the Swampscott Dory, undoubtedly one of our most popular 
displays at the Town Administration Building. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis A. Gallo, Chairman 



132 



The Planning Board 



Eugene Barden, Chairman 
Brian T. Watson, Clerk 
John Phelan, III 
Veeder C. Nellis 
Peter Beatrice, Jr. 

The Planning Board held eleven meetings during the year ending 
December 31, 1990 to study and reccommend action on various site 
plans, subdivision plans, easement plans, and a multitude of other 
planning and development issues. In addition, individual members 
made site visits and responded to citizen inquiries. 

In its continous efforts to be involved and make informed 
recommendations in the Town's interests, the Planning Board also 
held discussions on traffic, wetlands, parking, and landscaping issues. 
The Board continues its support for landbank legislation as a means 
to create a fund for future conservation land acquisition. 

The Board continued its gradual effort to improve and update 
the Zoning By-Law and the subdivision rules and regulations and held 
numerous discussions regarding possible changes. With the Building 
Inspector and the Board of Appeals, the Planning Board constantly 
measured the effectiveness of the By-Law in clearly defining 
permissible construction. 

We look forward to working with the various Town Boards and 
individuals in 1991. 



Swampscott Public Library 

For the Library, 1990 was a year of hope, fear, and relief but 
— most important of all — of stability. 

The Library started the year with a new Director, Stephen A. 
Fulchino, who began January 8th. His first job was to prepare the 
FY91 budget. For a time, however, the preparation looked to be an 
academic exercise, as rumors swirled that the Finance Committee 
was considering eliminating the Library if an override did not pass. 
The Friends of the Library organized a massive outpouring of support, 
which seems at least partially responsible for the Library having a 
modest amount set aside in the non-override budget. 



133 



With fear number one out of the way, fear number two came 
to the fore: without the override, the Library would have had to cut 
back its hours by a third. Fortunately, for the library service in 
Swampscott, the override passed, and the Library was able to keep 
its stalf and stay open 48 hours a week. 

Actually, the Library started the year at 40 hours. Starting in 
early February, the Library added Thursday nights and Saturday 
afternoons to its schedule Monday 9-5, Tuesday 9-9, Wednesday, 1- 
5, Thursday, 9-9, Friday 9-1, and Saturday, 9-5. 

Also in February, the Board of Selectmen voted to give the Library 
the entire $100,000 bequest of the late Judge Andrew Linscott. The 
Trustees have set the money aside in a special Linscott Endowment 
Fund. 

The commitment of the Library to the children of Swampscott 
was confirmed by its expanding professional coverage for children 
from 22 hours a week to 35 hours. The number of story hours in each 
session went from three to five. We were able to do this with the 
hiring of a second part-time Children's Librarian, Ellen Wittlinger. 

In March, the Library started a bimonthly newsletter, Re: Sources, 
which tells of upcoming programs and important collections. The 
Friends of the Library pay for the printing and mailing of Re: Sources. 

In April, we added a new Secretary/Bookkeeper, Dorothy Forman, 
to the staff. The voters elected a new Trustee in the April Tow elections. 
Thomas Cesarz replaced Kathy Epstein, who had decided not to run. 

The Summer saw a large number of children's programs, the 
most notable of which was a writing class. At the end of the class, 
the Library produced a booklet entitled Writers' Block: Poenis, Stories 
& Plays by Swampscott Students. 

In addition, the Abbot Public Library In Marblehead was closed 
for most of the Summer. This caused many Marblehead patrons to 
use the Swampscott Library, creating perhaps the busiest Summer 
in Swampscott Public Library history. 

In Fall, Jimmy Garfield rehung the pictures in the Reference Room. 

On December 13th, the Library had an Open House to celebrate 
the addition of a public on-line catalogue, CL-CAT, to the Library's 
array of services. 



134 



The expanded Library hours, the expanded children's program- 
ming, and the problems of nearby libraries were probably all factors 
in the modest increase of the Library circulation to 121,704. And the 
amount of money collected by the Library and sent into the General 
Fund rose by about $400 to $9,378. 

Without the aid of the Friends of the Library, the Library would 
not have had many small but necessary improvements and programs. 

The Library could not function as efficiently as it does without 
the help of the following volunteers, who free up staff members for 
the more challenging tasks: Bob Gold, Irma Lager, Marion Manker, 
Mildred Bingham, Ruth Rolin, Jean Kalabokis, Adele Taymore, and 
Harriet Stanton. 

Throughout this turbulent year — actually, set of years — the 
Trustees would like to acknowledge the one consistent fact of life which 
has allowed the Library to maintain its reputation for reliable, 
courteous, and proficient service: the staff. 

Committee to Study Repairs at the 
Phillips Beach Fire Station 

I would like to make this report to you as the acting chairman 
of the Phillip's Beach Fire Station Renovation Committee: 

At the 1988 Annual Town Meeting, a sum of $65,000 was voted 
for the renovation of the Phillip's Beach Fire Station. Also at that 
meeting, a committee was appointed by the Town Moderator to oversee 
the project and the spending of all monies. That committee consisted 
of Robert Baker who was selected by the other members as the 
chairman, Fred Speranza, Fred Ribicandria, Dr. Arthur Schwartz, 
and Louis Frisch. Later on in the project, Chief William R. Hyde 
was appointed to the committee due to the resignation of Robert Baker 
due to business commitments. 

After advertising in the Local paper and receiving sealed bids, 
the project was awarded to L & H Construction of 99 Grover Street, 
Medford. The project consisted of a complete remodeling of the kitchen 
and drill room area, a new heating system and substantial plumbing 
and electrical work. 



135 



The final bill was submitted to the Town Accountant for payment 
on December 21, 1990. I wish to express my sincere thanks to the 
Town Meeting Members who voted for this project and the members 
of the committee who devoted many hours of their time overseeing 
the project. 

Very truly yours, 

Fred Ribicandria 
Acting Chairman 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Thanks to Swampscott and 100 other communities, the Metro- 
politan Area Planning Council could continue to provide communities 
with regional planning services throughout fiscal year 1990, 

1. As part of MetroPlan 2000 -- our regional development plan 
— Swampscott was included in the following projects: 

a. mapping the sewer service area 

b. detailed analyses of sewer and water capacities 

c. solid waste management analyses and mapping 

d. analysis of local transportation priorities 

e. economic development and housing analyses 

f. open space and resource protection data analysis 

MetroPlan 2000 has been presented to the Swampscott Board 
of Selectmen. 

2. Swampscott was also included in these MAPC demographics 
reports: 

Employment and Income Forecasts 
Population and Age Group Forecasts 

Regional and Community Population and Employment Forecasts 
Business and Residential Growth in Metropolitan Boston 

3. MAPC also tracks recent and proposed commercial, industrial 
and residential development projects in Swampscott for research 
purposes. 

4. The North Shore Transportation Task Force reviewed the 
1990-94 TIP against subregional transportation priorities and 
examined local areas of environmental concern. 

MAPC appreciates Swampscott's continued support, and looks 
forward to further service in the years ahead. 

Sincerely, 

Robert Perry 

MAPC Representative 



136 



Police Department 



John E. Toomey, Chief 

Personnel 

On October 22, 1990 Officer Donald E. Connor retired after 15 
years of faithful and loyal service to the Police Department. On January 
8, 1991 Sergeant Walter B. Lee retired after 19 years of faithful and 
loyal service to the Police Department. Both of these dedicated officers 
will be missed and we all wish them good health and longevity in 
their retirement. 

Training 

Sergeant Francis Corcoran attended Mass. Criminal Justice 
Training Council classes to assume new duties as the department's 
police prosecutor. 

All officers were recertified in CPR as required by law. 

Fourteen officers completed recertification as EMT-A, necessary 
to perform ambulance services. 

Lieutenant William McGinn and Officers John Dube, Thomas 
Stephens, David Matherson, Peter J. Cassidy and Eugene Ruscitti 
were trained as Infrared Breathalyzer Operators at the Mass. State 
Police Academy. 

Captain Paul DesRoches was recertified by the FBI and Mass. 
Criminal Justice Training Council as a police firearms instructor in 
the semi-automatic pistol, revolver, and shotgun. 

Thirty-nine regular, reserve and special police officers received 
re-qualification training in the service pistol and revolver. 

Inspector George Gately attended a two day MCJTC school safety 
officers seminar. 

Lieutenant John Alex and Officer John Dube attended training 
classes and were certified as FBI/NCIC computer coordinators for 
this department. 

Inspector Robert Berry attended classes in police prosecuting and 
investigation of child abuse and family abuse cases. 



137 



Daily Shift Report 



Starting Activity Date 1/01/90 

Starting Activity Time :01 

Ending Activity Date 12/31/90 

Ending Activity Time 23:59 

Print Activities Involving a Case (C) 

OR All Activities (A): A 

Selected Class Code to Print : 

Sort of Sequence to Report : CLASS CODE 

Print Complete/Active Calls : ALL CALLS 

SUMMARY REPORT ONLY 



Shift Report Summary for 1/01/90 @ :01 to 12/31/90 23:59 







Complete 


Active 


Calls for Service 


5,517 





Officer Initiated Calls 


523 





TXT TT'/^ 

IN r 


Information Only 


6 





TEST 


Test 




yj 


lOlB 


Notification 


43 

to 





lOlD 


Assist Fire Department 


17 


n 


lOlE 


Assist Other PD 


21 





102A 


Complaint 


391 





102B 


Auto-Disabled 


18 





102C 


Auto-Lockout 


3 





102D 


Lockout-Other 


1 





102F 


Transportation 


7 





102G 


Money Escort 


2 





102J 


DPW Notification 


78 





102K 


Service Call General/No Crime 


308 





102M 


Truants 


3 





103 A 


Hazardous Condition/General 


18 





103B 


Fuel Spill 


1 





103C 


Hazardous Road Conditions 


12 





103G 


Snow/Ice Hazard 


4 





103H 


Beach/Bather Hazard 


1 





1031 


Marine Hazard 


2 





103J 


Wire Down/Power Failure 


18 





103M 


Road Defect 


1 





104A 


Property/Found 


19 





104B 


Property/Lost 


17 





104C 


Property/Returned 


1 





104D 


Property/Confiscated 


3 





104E 


Property Damaged 


2 





104F 


Recovered Bicycle 


15 





105A 


Barking Dog 


10 






138 



105B 


Animal-Bites 


11 





105C 


Animal-Cruelty 


3 





105D 


Animal-Dead/Injured 


59 





105E 


Animal-Loose 


19 





106B 


Mental Illness Problem 


17 





106C 


Sudden Death/Natural Causes 


11 





106D 


Sudden Death/Investigation 


3 





106E 


Medical Aid/Illness/Ambulance 


195 





106F 


Medical Aid/Injury/Ambulance 


87 





106G 


Medical Aid/Illness/Cruiser 


41 





106H 


Medical Aid/Injury/Cruiser 


25 





1061 


Medical Aid/No Transport/Refused 


44 





106J 


Medical Aid/Private Transport 


77 





106K 


Medical Aid/ Assist Party 


1 





107A 


Open Door/Window 


235 





107B 


Street Lights Out 


3 





107C 


Susp. Person/Vehicle/ Activity 


470 





107D 


Traffic Lights Out 


2 





107E 


Street Sign Missing 


1 





107G 


Water Break 


4 





108A 


Alarm-Burg-False/ Accidental 


1,375 





108B 


Alarm-Fire-False/ Accidental 


129 





108C 


Alarms/DPW 


3 





109A 


Suicide Attempt 


1 





llOA 


Civil Matter 


1 





HOB 


Neighbor Dispute/Non-Criminal 


16 





lllA 


Missing Person 


25 





112A 


Auto-Illegally Parked 


47 





112D 


Abandoned Vehicle 


13 





113A 


MVA/Property Damage Under $1000 


84 





113B 


MV A/Property Damage Over $1000 


77 





113C 


MVA/PI 


40 





113E 


MVA/Pedestrian 


4 





113F 


MVA/Bicycle 


7 





113H 


MV A/ Uninvestigated 


20 





1131 


Hit/Run Injury 


4 





113J 


Hit Run/ Property Damage 


43 





120A 


Defective Equipment 


1 





120D 


LV. Scene Prop. Damage 


2 





120G 


Oper. Under the Influence 


98 





120J 


Lie. Revoked/Suspended 


37 





120L 


Unregistered M.V. 


50 





120N 


Motor Vehicle Violation (Other) 


70 





130 A 


Arrest/Warrant (SWA PD Warrant) 


6 





130B 


Arrest Warrant (Other PD Warrant) 


63 





130C 


Arrest/SWA. Warrant by Other PD 


9 





130E 


Fugitive From Justice Arrest 


1 





130F 


Protective Custody 


60 





133A 


Possessing Alcohol/Town Property 


1 





139A 


Bomb Scare 


8 





142A 


Forgery 


2 





142B 


Littering 


2 





1420 


Counterfeit Money/Documents Etc 


2 





144A 


Dist. the Peace/Disord. Person 


8 






139 



144B 


Fireworks Complaint 


26 





144C 


Disturbance/General 


209 





144D 


Loud Party 


53 





1450 


Firearm Comp. (No Assault) 


3 





146A 


Violating Restraining Order 


2 





146B 


Threats/Gestures 


10 





146C 


Domestic 


78 





USA 


Drugs-Possession 


1 





150A 


Dumping/Littering 


4 





154A 


Defrauding Common Vict./Innkeeper 


1 





154B 


Evading Taxi Fare 


1 





1540 


Frauds/Obtaining Money Falsely 


2 





1560 


Fish and Game Complaints 


1 





162A 


Minor in Poss. of Liquor 


10 





164A 


Vandalism to MV. 


86 





164B 


Vandalism (Other) 


85 





164C 


Vandalism to Town Property 


36 





1640 


Malicious Misch. 


23 





166A 


Poss. Burg Tools 


1 





1660 


Poss. Burg Tools 


1 





170B 


Indecent Exposure 


9 





170C 


Peeping Tom 


1 





172A 


Tel. Calls- Annoy/Threat/Obscene 


37 





176A 


Trespass After Notice 


5 





200A 


Serving Court Papers 


1 





888 


Quick Clear/No Report Required. 


48 





900C 


Fire/Single Family Dwelling 


14 





901C 


Fire/Multi-Family Dwelling 


5 





904 C 


Fire/Commercial Building 


3 





906C 


Fire/Other Building 


4 





907A 


Arson/Mot. Veh/In Use 


1 





907C 


Fire/Motor Vehicle 


10 





908C 


Fire/Other Mobile 


2 





909C 


Fire/Brush-Woods-Fences-Signs Etc 


11 





910B 


Fire/Food on the Stove 


1 





911A 


Assault/Citizen/Simple 


2 





911B 


Assault/Domestic/Simple 


2 





913A 


A&B/Citizen/Simple 


31 





913B 


A&B/Domestic/Simple 


2 





913D 


A&B/P.O./Simple 


3 





914A 


A&B/Cit/Ag. Injury 


3 





914D 


A&B/P.O./Ag. Injury 


1 





915B 


ABDW/Cit/Cut. Instrument 


1 





915C 


ABDW/Cit/Other Weapon 


1 





916B 


ADW/Cit/Cut. Instrument 


4 





920A 


B&E/D/Veh/Forced 


4 





920B 


B&E/N/Veh/Forced 


21 





920E 


B&E/D/Vehicle/No Force 


6 





920F 


B&E/N/Vehicle/No Force 


14 





921A 


B&E/D/Attempt/Build 


2 





921B 


B&E/D/Build/Forced 


1 





921C 


B&E/D/Build/Unlawful Entry 


1 





921D 


B&E/N/ Attempt/Build 


2 





921E 


B&E/N/Build/Force Entry 


9 






140 



921 G 


B&E/Unk/ Attempt/Build 


1 





921J 


B&E/Unk/Build/Unlawful Entry 


2 





922A 


B&E/D/ Attempt/Residence 


6 





922B 


B&E/D/Resid/Force Entry 


17 





922C 


B&E/D/Resid/Unlaw. Entry 


3 





922E 


B&E/N/Residence/Forced 


19 





922F 


Burg/N/Unlaw. Entry 


1 





922H 


Burg/N/Aslt/Unlaw. Entry 


1 





922K 


Burg/N/Armed/Unlaw. Entry 


1 





922L 


B&E/UnlVResid/ Attempt 


3 





922M 


B&E/UnVResid/Force Entry 


3 





922N 


B&E/UnVResid/Unlawful Entry 


2 





923D 


B&E/N/ Attempt/School 


1 





923F 


B&E/N/School/Unlaw. Entry 


3 





924D 


B&E/N/Other/ Attempt 


2 





924F 


B&E/N/Other/Unlaw. Entry 


1 





924G 


B&E/Unk/Other/Attempt 


1 





930A 


Lar/Pick-P/Under $50 


3 





930B 


Lar/Pick-P/$50-$200 


3 





930C 


Lar/Pick-P/$200-$400 


2 





930D 


Lar/Pick-P/$400+ 


7 





930E 


Lar/Pursesnatch/Und $50 


2 





930F 


Lar/ Pu rsesnatch/$50-$200 


3 





930G 


Lar/Pursesnatch/$200-$400 


1 





930H 


Lar/Pursesnatch/$400+ 


1 





930J 


Lar/Shoplift/Und $50 


32 





930K 


Lar/Shoplift/$50-$200 


26 





930L 


Lar/Shoplift/$200-$400 


6 





930M 


Lar/Shoplift/$400+ 


4 





930N 


Lar/Frm-Veh/Und $50 


7 





930O 


Lar/Frm-Veh/$50-$200 


4 





930P 


Lar/Frm-Veh/$200-$400 


9 





930Q 


Lar/Frm-Veh/$400+ 


16 





930R 


Lar/Autoparts/Und $50 


1 





930S 


Lar/Autoparts/$50-$200 


2 





930T 


Lar/Autoparts/$200-$400 


3 





930U 


Lar/Autoparts/$400+ 


3 





930V 


Stolen License Plate 


24 





931B 


Lar/Bike/$50-$200 


25 





931C 


Lar/Bike/$200-$400 


19 





931D 


Lar/Bike/$400+ 


15 





931E 


Lar/Frm Build/Under $50 


7 





931F 


Lar/Frm Build/$50-$200 


5 





931G 


Lar/Frm Build/$200-$400 


10 





931H 


Lar/Frm Build/$400+ 


17 





931L 


Lar/Frm Coin Mach/$200-$400 


3 





931N 


Lar/Gas-No Pay/Und $50 


1 





931T 


Lar/Other/Under $50 


16 





931U 


Lar/Other/$50-$200 


18 





931V 


Lar/Other/$200-$400 


3 





931 W 


Lar/Other/$400+ 


11 





932B 


Lar/By Check/$50-$200 


1 





932C 


Lar/By Check/$200-$400 


1 





932D 


Lar/By Check/$400+ 


2 






141 



935A 


Lar/M.V./Auto 


33 





935B 


Lar/M.V./Trucks, Buses, Etc. 


4 





935C 


Lar/M.V./Other 


2 





936A 


Stol/Rec. Local/ Autos 


10 





936B 


Stol/Rec. Local/Trk, Bus, Etc. 


2 





P3fiD 


Stol. Ix)c/Rec. D.T./Auto 


21 





936F 


Stol. Lx)c/Rec. D.T./Other 


6 





936G 


Stol. OT/Rec. Loc/Auto 


9 





936H 


Stol. OT/Rec. Loc/Trk, Bus, Etc. 


1 





960A 


Rob/Hgwy/Oun 


1 





960D 


Rob/Commercial/Gun 


2 





960H 


Rob/Gas Sta/Knife 


1 





961B 


Unarmed Rob/Commercial 


1 





961C 


Unarmed Rob/Gas Station 


1 





961G 


Unarmed Rob/Misc 


2 





9990 


Mistake/Disregard Case 


2 





9999 


Case Already Entered/Mistake 


2 







Unidentified Class Codes 


11 







Total number of Calls Listed 


6,040 






Recommendations 

I recommend that the Town replace the worn out floor covering 
on the main floor at the police station. I urge the Town to purchase 
protective vests (bullet proof) for use by the police officers. 

Appreciation 

I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of 
Selectmen, Paula Maguire, The Administrative Assistant to the Chief 
of Police, Patt George, Selectmen's Secretary, The School Traffic 
Supervisors, Eugene Nigrelli and Steven Levine, Finance Committee 
Liason Members to the Police Department and especially to the men 
and woman of the Police Department. I would also like to extend 
my thanks to all other Town Departments and others who have helped 
and cooperated with this department throughout the year. 



142 



Parking Commissioner's Report 

October 1, 1990 — December 31, 1990 

Quarterly Report 



Number of Tickets Cleared 1204 

Quarterly Collected $12,035.00 

Quarterly Collected From Archived Violations . . .$4,585.00 
Quarterly Expenses $488.09 

Year to Date 

Number of Tickets Cleared 2028 

Total Collected to Date $22,730.00 

Total Collected From Archived Violations $6,455.00 

Total Expenses to Date $827.59 



Very truly yours, 
John B. Bolduc 



Board of Public Works 

David L. Phillips, Chairman 
Kevin G. Gookin 
Daniel P. Kelly 
Alan F. Taubert, P.E., P.L.S. 
Superintendent of Public Works 
Town Engineer 

The Board of Public Works is pleased to report that the largest 
public works project in the history of the Town of Swampscott is under 
way. The Board is also pleased to report that it has been successful 
in securing a commitment from the State to provide financing for 
the project. This good fortune will have a favorable impact upon the 
Town's cost of wastewater treatment well into the future. The 
intermunicipal agreement with Nahant, Saugus, and the Lynn Water 
and Sewer Commission has been signed and work is progressing. 

The construction contracts for the pipeline to Lynn and the 
conversion of the treatment plant to a pumping station were awarded 
and work began during December. 



143 



The engineering contract for the storm water separation project 
in Lynn necessary to provide capacity for Swampscott's flow was signed 
and is progressing on schedule. The construction contracts are 
scheduled to begin during 1991. 

Two contracts for sewer system rehabilitation and sewer sealing 
have been awarded for work in Swampscott. These projects will reduce 
our sewage flow and lower our pumping and treatment costs. The 
Town has received a 75% State grant of $1,211,019 to help fund the 
contracts. 

The Town has also received a 75% State grant of $207,000 to 
conduct detailed studies of the location and sources of uncontaminated 
water entering our sewer system. The work will begin in the Spring 
and will include the inspection of 2500 properties. Contracts will then 
be prepared to provide for the elimination of this clean water to further 
reduce our treatment costs. 

A state grant of $105,660 has been received for the completion 
of the 16 inch water line in Paradise Road from Farragut Road to 
the water tank on Plymouth Lane. The engineering work will be 
performed this winter with construction to take place during late 
summer and the fall. The State grant combined with the $161,000 
approved by the Town in 1988 will fund the project. 

A new service requests system was begun in August to provide 
for more efficient control of the Department's resources and for 
improved accountability. For the 5 month period from August to 
January the following requests were received and completed: 

Forestry — 280 requests for service. Half have been completed. 
The remaining will be completed with a rented bucket truck during 
January and February. 

Water — 140 requests completed. Typical requests include stopped 
meters, dirty water requiring flushing, hydrant repairs, valve repairs, 
leaks, low pressure, quality testing, and pumping station maintenance. 

Highway — 315 requests completed. Examples are pot holes, street 
sweeping, railings and gates, horses for holiday parties, painting, litter 
control, pier and beach maintenance. Fish House maintenance, 
sidewalk repairs, curbing repairs, and brush cutting. 

Motor Pool — 58 requests for major work such as brake jobs 
and installing sanders. Minor work on items such as lawn mowers 



144 



and chain saws are not included in the request program but comprise 
a major work load. 

Sewer and Drainage — 65 requests completed that include 
manhole and catch basin repairs, collapsed pipe repairs, plugged 
drains, brook cleaning, and sewer backups. When not on emergency 
calls the Sewer Division flushes, vacuums, and cleans sewers, drains 
and catch basins on a preventative maintenance program. 

Signs — 62 requests completed. Includes traffic control, streets, 
warning and safety signs. 

The following divisions provide routine services and have small 
numbers of external service requests. 

Park Division — Maintained all of the Town's parks, playgrounds, 
malls, ball fields and two (2) miles of beaches. 

Cemetery Division — Maintained the Town's cemetery including 
98 interments, grass cutting, 48 foundations, bush trimming and 
operates and maintains the sewage sludge composting operation 
located behind the cemetery. 

Engineering — The Engineering Division began a comprehen- 
sive evaluation of sidewalks and streets in the town. An infrastructure 
management program will be developed to assure that work is done 
in accordance with use and condition. 

The following major projects were completed: 

1. Resurfaced the following streets: 

Sampson Avenue 
Curry Circle 
Porter Place 

Elm wood Road 
Palmer Avenue 

2. Repaired 500 feet of concrete sidewalks. 

3. Installed the inclinometers on the Essesx Street bridge 
retaining wall. 

4. Completed repairs of the King's Beach seawall. 



145 



5. Flushed, tested and winterized all 500 of the Town's 
hydrants. 

6. Continued working on the regional leaf composting facility. 

7. Collected an estimated 600 tons of leaves. 

8. Painted Blocksidge Stadium and the railings along the 
Town's beaches. 

9. Installed a drainage system in Phillips Park to alleviate 
the flooding of the baseball fields and the track. 

10. Obtained state approval of a backflow prevention program 
for protection of our water system. Building surveys will 
be performed by the Water Division personnel this winter. 

11. Began a comprehensive sewer and drain cleaning program. 

12. Sealed cracks on the following streets. 

Sampson Avenue 
Jessie Street 
Roy Street 
Curry Circle 
Porter Place 
Elm wood Road 
Palmer Road 
Monument Avenue 

13. Joined a regional purchasing consortium for water and 
sewage treatment supplies estimated to save approximately 
$12,000 a year in chemical costs. 

The office staff continues to prepare water and sewer billing 
information, payrolls, purchases, abatements, communication, and 
provide customer service. 



146 



Tree Warden 

James L. Gardiner, Tree Warden 
Grene N. Gardiner, Deputy Tree Warden 

Removed twenty (20) to thirty (30) diseased and hazardous trees 
in Town and stumps. 

Pruned trees when necessary. 

Planted thirty-five (35) to forty (40) trees including Norway 
Maples, Red Maples, Crimson Kings, Bradford Pears and Kwansan 
Cherry. 

Planted five hundred (500) seedlings for Arbor Day. Town supplied 
these seedlings and the fourth and fifth graders of the Machon, Clarke, 
Hadley and Stanley Schools planted them. 

Shaved roots that were potentially hazardous to pedestrians. 

Posted tree hearing notices for trees to be removed. 

Sprayed Hawthornes for Hawthorne Elite disease. 

Sprayed to eliminate poison ivy. 

Hired a skyworker for two months for pruning and large branch 
removal. 

Many trees were lost due to storm damage. Several were also 
lost due to damage caused by vehicles hitting them. 

Tree surgery and bark tracing are performed on those trees struck 
by vehicles. 

The Tree Warden and Deputy Tree Warden are members of the 
Massachusetts Tree Wardens' and Foresters' Association. 



147 



Recreation Commission 



Andrew B. Holmes, Chairman 
Marie J. Clarke 
Richard Dedrick 
Sylvia L. Stamell 
Sherman Freedman 
Bernard 0. Bloom 
John J. Hughes, Jr. 
William J. Bush, Coordinator 

With the policy of the Recreation Commission to provide 
worthwhile leisuretime activities for all age groups in the community, 
we continue to improve the programs sponsored directly by the 
Commission, which include: parking areas, beaches and lifeguards, 
adult and youth tennis, gymnastics, teen fitness and conditioning, youth 
and adult sailing, track and field, youth and adult basketball, and 
playground activities. 

We still provide beach and railroad street parking stickers for 
a fee. 

To minimize costs, we increased some fees for programs, and the 
total collected and turned in to the Town General Funds was $21,660 
during the past fiscal year. 

This year the sailing program was increased by 56 percent due 
to a newly formed sailing committee. The playground program 
increased 29 percent in 1990. 

We are also working closely with the Department of Public Works 
in the upkeep, rehabilitation and use of the parks in the Town. 

The Commission wishes to thank the Board of Public Works and 
their staff for the maintenance of equipment, and the Commission 
also wishes to thank the School Administration for the use of school 
facilities and the personnel needed to conduct our programs. 



148 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the members of the Swampscott School Committee and the 
citizens of Swampscott. 

I am both duty bound and gratified, as the Chief Executive Officer 
of the School System and Secretary to the Swampscott School 
Committee, to present the 1990 Annual Report. This annual "State 
of the School System" is a document which contains a compilation 
of the myriad of events and activities that reflect an undiminished 
commitment on the part of both the professional and support personnel 
of all our schools to the never-ending pursuit of designing and 
implementing quality instructional programs. Nonetheless, I would 
be remiss if I did not state that the fiscal situation at both the federal 
and state levels has resulted in severe "cuts" that has led to a 
dismantling of various programs. Our heritage is one of excellence 
but excellence cannot be maintained by desire alone; an infusion of 
additional monies is vital if we are to provide our youth with the 
knowledge and skills required as they assume the roles of adult citizen 
and worker in the 21st century. 



School Committee 1990 



Mrs. Sandra Rotner, Chairperson 
Mr. Robert Ingram, Vice Chairperson 
Mr. Kevin Breen 
Mr. Richard Feinberg 
Dr. Mary-Lou B. Sherr 



21 Gale Road 
33 Magnolia Road 
47 Paradise Road 
12 Bradlee Avenue 
39 Blaney Street 



Regular meetings, second and fourth Tuesday of each month. 
The public is welcome. 



Central Office 
Administration 



Richard K. Chrystal, Ed.D., 

Superintendent of Schools 596-8800 
Jacqueline Blanchard, Director of 

Business and Personnel Administration 596-8802 
Richard Coletti, Director of Plant 

and Maintenance 596-8802 
Deborah Norling, Director of Pupil 

Personnel Services 596-8805 



149 



The Office of the Superintendent of Schools, located at Swampscott 
High School, 207 Forest Avenue, is open each weekday from 8:00 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

School Administration 
Principals 



Peter Sack 
Ronald Landman 
Richard Baker 



Margaret Griffin 



Sheridan Matthiesen 



Martha Cesarz 



High School 596-8830 

Middle School 596-8820 

Clarke School 
Director of Physical 
Education, Health, 

and Athletics K-12 596-8812 

Hadley School 

Director of Learning/ 

Language Arts 596-8847 

Machon School 

Director of Learning/ 

Educational Technology 

K-6 and Mathematics K-6 596-8835 

Stanley School 

Director of Learning/ 

Science K-6 596-8837 



Paul Athanas 
Donald Babcock 
Joseph Balsama 
Clayton Curtis 
Carl Jack 
John McDevitt 
John Nolan 
Sanders Stephen 



Curriculum Planning Team 
Department Chairs 

Practical Arts 7-12 

English 7-12 

Science 7-12 

Fine Arts K-12 

Mathematics 7-12 

Guidance K-12 

World Languages 7-12 

Social Studies 7-12 



150 



The Nation's Education Goals: 
Working Together for America's Future 

The goals listed below were adopted by President George Bush 
and all 50 of the nation's governors in 1990. These goals are not the 
President's goals or the Governors' goals; they are the nation's goals. 

These educational goals are the beginning, not the end, of the 
process. Governors are committed to working within their own states 
to review state education goals and performance levels in light of these 
national goals. States are encouraged to adjust, modify, and expand 
upon the national goals where appropriate. The President and the 
Governors have challenged every family, school system, School Board 
or Committee, educator and community to adopt these national goals 
as their own and establish other goals that reflect the particular 
circumstances and challenges they face as America approaches the 
twenty-first century. 

Readiness for School. By the year 2000, all children in America 
will start school ready to learn. 

School Completion. By the year 2000, the high school graduation 
rate will increase to at least 90 per cent. 

Achievement and Citizenship. By the year 2000, American schools 
will graduate grades four, eight, and twelve having demonstrated 
competency in challenging subjects including English, 
Mathematics, Science, History, and Geography; and every school 
in America will insure that all students learn to use their minds 
well, so they may be prepared for responsible citizenship, further 
learning, and productive employment in our modern economy. 

Science and Mathematics. By the year 2000, United States 
students will be first in the world in science and mathematics 
achievement. 

Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools. By the year 2000, every 
school in America will be free of drugs and violence and will 
offer a disciplined environment conducive to learning. Adult 
Literacy and Lifelong Learning. By the year 2000, every adult 
American will be literate and will possess the knowledge and 
skills necessary to compete in a global economy and exercise the 
rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 



151 



The Goals of the Swampscott Public Schools 



As Superintendent of Schools I am proud to inform the citizenry 
of Swampscott that the staff of our school system wrote goals for our 
schools and had them validated by School Committee acceptance in 
September of 1987. The purpose of this effort to state projected goals 
and programs for the Swampscott Public Schools was, and continues 
to be, to provide a blueprint for orderly change in an era where those 
who stand still go backwards. In our immediate present, our unstable 
today, hope is alive as we update our five-year plan annually. A plan 
that identifies the tasks to be accomplished in order that the student 
graduating in 1996 receives what he/she needs to know and what 
he/she will want to know in that year and the years thereafter. 

Goals are essential to the process of education. They provide ideals. 
They provide ideals toward which learners and educators strive as 
well as a context for learning and a sense of purpose. They are 
indispensable for measuring what the process of education does to, 
for, and with all students. Members of the community who wish to 
acquire a copy of the Philosophy of the Swampscott School Committee 
and the goals of the school system may do so by calling the Office 
of the Superintendent of Schools and requesting same. 

The Philosophy of the Swampscott School Committee 

Today more than ever the public school is recognized as one of 
the most important institutions in the United States devoted to the 
total development of human potential. The learning program within 
the school must be efficient and effective. It calls for the transmission 
and utilization of knowledge, skills, talents, and attitudes which will 
enable students to develop to their full potential as individuals. 

To accept a truthful assessment of themselves, their hopes, their 
ambitions and the world around them, students are encouraged and 
directed to study and research independently, to think logically, and 
to communicate ideas meaningfully. Students are guided in their 
interpretation of the modern world by an appreciation of their 
democratic heritage and thus be discerning in their choice of competent 
leadership and as a result become intelligent participants in their 
communities and vocations. Moral, ethical, and aesthetic values are 
exemplified as indispensable guides to richer and more rewarding 
living. Fundamental to this process is the conviction that every student 
must be regarded as an individual worthy of each educator's sincere 
interest, best efforts, and respect. 



152 



Practices and Procedures to Attain System Objectives 

• A required program of study and school-directed experiences 
for all students, developed through school and community 
participation, which emphasizes the fundamental and broader 
aspects of a sound education. 

• The provision of varying levels of challenge in basic subject fields 
to encourage students to be motivated to work successfully at 
their levels of ability. 

• A flexible curriculum from kindergarten through grade 12 which 
will provide students with a sound education, based upon 
recognition of their individual abilities, needs, and goals. 

• A guidance program for all students at all levels which, through 
counseling and testing, helps students adjust to their 
environment, develop their potentials, and utilize their interests 
and abilities to meet personal needs and goals; efforts to help 
students adjust to physical, emotional, or social problems, to take 
career consideration into account at the appropriate levels, and 
to select programs of studies and activities which will lead to 
the ultimate realization of career choices. 

• The preparation, development, and encouragement of all students 
to become independent, self-directed learners participating in 
independent study and research and, utilizing all communications 
media; emphasis on stimulation and guidance of self-paced 
learning which will lead to the emergence of individual citizens 
capable of thinking critically, making sound judgments, and be- 
coming productive and effective members of a democratic society. 

• A program of enriching experiences, both cocurricular and 
extracurricular, to help students with personal, physical, mental, 
and social development, as well as to guide them in the wise 
use of leisure time. 

Since school reflects the needs, values, strengths, and aspirations 
of the community, it follows that the school and the home should work 
together to further develop those personal characteristics which will 
lead to a better individual and community life for all its citizens. 
Therefore, a continuing dialogue among community, home, and school 
should be maintained to the end that all of the children of all of the 
people will be given the opportunity to develop, thoughtfully assess, 
and appropriately adjust to the needs of a changing society. 



153 



Staff Changes 



Listed below are personnel changes that occurred during the year 
1990. Again, as in the past, changes in personnel according to school 
assignment will be noted. 

"New" members of the staff join the Swampscott family of 
educators through a series of orientation programs. They begin what 
will be for all, hopefully, a long and mutually collegial relationship. 
To those who have left the system by way of either retirement or 
resignation a sincere thanks is extended for their many contributions 
to the youth of Swampscott and we wish them well in their future 
endeavors. 

CENTRAL OFFICE 
Appointment: 

Michele Schultz, Secretary in Office of the Superintendent 

Resignation: 

JoAnn Bishop, Cafeteria Director 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Appointments: 

Donald Babcock, English Department Chair 

Jon Flanagan, Social Studies 

Frank Grasso, Custodian 

Frank Grasso, Jr., Custodian 

Lorraine Hodin, Social Studies 

Adam Locke, Custodian 

Patricia Maitland, Instructional Aide 

Sanders Stephen, Social Studies Department Chair 

Reappointment: 

Linda Portnoy, Business/Computer 

Resignations: 

Richard Baldacci, Art 
Christopher Ratley, Math/Science 

Leave of Absence: 

Ann McGuiggin, Business 

Retirement: 

Cynthia Lang, Secretary 

Harvey Michaels, Social Studies Department Chair 



154 



Transfer: 

Lawrence Lucie, Custodian (to Middle School) 



Deceased: 

Michael Spencer, Social Studies 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Appointments: 

Lucille Cafarella, French - Part-time 

Kathleen Canavan, Instructional Aide 

Lawrence Lucie, Junior Custodian to Senior Custodian 

Anna Marie Mancini, French/Spanish 

Resignations: 

Nilgun Akdag, Math 

Monica Caporale, Special Education Instructional Aide 
Suzanne Garfield, Foreign Language 

Retirements: 

Ronald Cameron, Senior Custodian 
Carol Dedrick, Secretary 

CLARKE SCHOOL 

Appointments: 

Pamela Angelakis, Instructional Aide 

Lisa Barry, Resource Room Aide 

Cindy Crawford, Special Needs PreSchool Aide 

Jennifer Duncklee, Instructional Aide 

Suzanne Feeley, Instructional Aide 

Gayle Greenbaum, Early Childhood Aide 

Ann McFarland, Special Needs PreSchool Aide 

Roberta McGowen, Early Childhood Aide 

James Montanari, Instructional Aide 

Michelle Zampell, Instructional Aide 

Resignations: 

Jennifer Duncklee, Instructional Aide 

Ann Hannaher, Special Needs PreSchool Aide 

Kathy Holahan, Extended Day Care Aide 

Jody Moscaritolo, Special Education Instructional Aide 

Transfers: 

Arlene Rosen, Kindergarten - from Machon School 



155 



MACHON SCHOOL 



Appointments: 

Pamela Angelakis, Grade Two - Lx)ng-Term Substitute 

Ann Bush, Grade Four Teacher 

Michael Carberry, Junior Building Custodian 

Brenda Cassidy, Extended Day Coordinator 

Pamela Cleveland, Chapter 1 Tutor 

Cindy Crawford, Associate Teacher Extended Day 

Paula Gray, Instructional Aide 

Eugene Haskell, Jr., Building Custodian 

Barbara Immar, Grade One Teacher 

Barbara Leone, Instructional Aide 

Ted Sperounis, Guidance Counselor 

Retirement: 

Selma Sklar, Grade Two Teacher 

Resignations: 

Arthur James George, Junior Building Custodian 
Bonnie Prout, Chapter 1 Tutor 



HADLEY SCHOOL 

Appointments: 

Mary Clain, Extended Day Coordinator 

Stephanie Concannon, Kindergarten, part-time. Also Associate 

Teacher Extended Day 
Lee Dineen, Instructional Aide 
Ruth Hendrickson, Instructional Aide 
Ronald Mitchell, Junior Building Custodian 
Emily Sperounis, Grade Five Teacher 
John Tofuri, Junior Building Custodian 

Retirement: 

Fletcher Johnson, Physical Education 



STANLEY SCHOOL 
Resignations: 

Margaret DeCamp, Special Education Instructional Aide 
Margaret Johnston, Grade One Teacher 
Allison Shifres, Instructional Aide 

Transfers: 

Margaret Danahy, Reading - from Machon School 



156 



SUBJECT SPECIALISTS - SYSTEM 

Appointments: 

Ann Bowen, Art 

Francine Goldstein, Reading Coordinator K-12 
Martha Kelleher, Dance Movement 
Nancy Tumarkin, Music 

Resignations: 

Cynthia Smith Coffin, Art 
Stephanie Longfritz, Art 
Laurie Peckins, Music 

SYSTEM-WIDE SUPPORT STAFF 

Appointments: 

Frantz Kerbreau, Van Driver 

David Legere, Assistant Athletic Director 

Maria Lincoln, Van Driver 

Dulcinea MacCarthy, ESL Tutor 

Jean Massad, Trainer 

Janice O'Connell, Part-time Cafeteria 

Deborah Palmer, Part-time Cafeteria 

Janet Picariello, Part-time Cafeteria 

Josephine Racki, Part-time Cafeteria 

Resignations: 

Joanne Gallant, Cafeteria Worker 

Frantz Kebreau, Van Driver 

Maria Lincoln, Courier 

Katherine Shinay, Assistant Athletic Director 

Retirements: 

Lois Donahue, Cafeteria 

David Dragan, Elementary Guidance 

Leave of Absence: 

Cindy Miller Katz, Speech Pathologist 



157 



The Swampscott Learning System and Project BESST 

Approximately a year and a half ago I presented to the School 
Committee a projection of what programs may be enhanced and offered 
in order that our graduates would have the requisite skills and 
knowledge to meet the challenges they will confront as they commence 
to assume their roles as citizens and workers in the 21st century. 

The plan was and remains entitled Project BESST (Building 
Excellent Swampscott Schools Together) The development of this five- 
j^ear plan was necessitated by the awareness that major forces are 
driving our society and, therefore, our schools rapidly into uncharted 
waters. These forces or trends include: 

• The changing work force 

• The technological environment 

• Globalization 

• The changing family 

• The age of convenience 

• Changes in school leadership 

• The changing nature of who we are 

• The increasing popularity of alternatives 

• Educators of tomorrow 

• An increase in the kind of ethical and value questions being 
posed 

In addition to these forces educators continually focus on four 
fundamental questions concerning curriculum and instruction that 
were originally formulated by Dr. Ralph Tyler. They are: 

1. What educational purposes should the school seek to attain? 

2. What educational experiences can be provided that are likely 
to attain these purposes? 

3. How can these educational experiences be effectively 
organized? 

4. How can we determine whether these purposes are being 
attained? 

Recognition that this is a period of economic and fiscal austerity 
cannot dissuade us from the responsibility of answering these questions 
and to do so by constructing and activating programs and systems 
that give to our clients quality instructional programs. 



158 



Of what programs do I speak? Consider the effect of the forces 
I referenced earlier. Our labor force will be more highly educated 
than ever. Interpersonal skills will be more important. Information 
workers will need higher level thinking skills. Technological literacy 
will be necessary for all students. Students will have to be equipped 
with transferrable skills. Adult retraining programs will proliferate. 
It will become more difficult for educators to remain current in their 
field. Voice activation will require new speaking skills. The amount 
of handwriting and keyboarding in our schools will change. Teaching 
techniques will be reshaped. Computers will play a more active role 
in drill and practice. The number of foreign languages will expand 
to include Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic. The curriculum 
will focus on global issues. Interdisciplinary programs will expand. 
Family Life Education will grow. Current definition of homework 
will change. Extended day programs will be introduced. Schools will 
consider a new time cycle. School schedules will change. The current 
model of after-school activities will be restructured. Educator 
accountability will be demanded by parents. The management of 
classroom time will be altered. Career ladder concepts will gain in 
popularity. Traditional labor organizations will change. Our delivery 
of English as a Second Language will be altered. We will need to 
meet the needs of an ever culturally divergent student body. The elderly 
will demand a significantly larger proportion of society's resources. 
We will need to reexamine our curriculum offerings in light of 
competition from a voucher system. We will begin to seriously question 
the school's obligation in teaching conflicting values and ethics: if it 
is to be done, and if so, how should it be done. 

These are powerful trends and they have led to demands to 
restructure the educational system. The National Governors 
Association adopted restructuring as its educational agenda for the 
1990's. This call to restructure is a direct result of the increasing 
recognition that graduates of American high schools lack the requisite 
skills to compete with their counterparts in such countries as Japan 
and Germany. Needless to say governors are astute politicians; they 
do not stand alone. They are responding to a growing consensus calling 
for improvements in the efficiency and productivity of schools, in tune 
with massive restructuring in business, industry, and agriculture and 
with rapid demographic and social changes. 

Imbedded in the many approaches to restructuring is the concept 
of school-based management. As one who supports this concept as 
exemplified in Project BESST (Building Excellent Swampscott 
! Schools Together), I continue to work with administrative and teaching 
staff to actualize processes and activities that will nurture teacher 



159 



empowerment and shared decision-making, not with any sense of 
revolutionary immediacy but planned, intervening strategies that will 
guarantee a quality instructional program. 

Many educators may be understandably wary, having been 
criticized on the one hand for being impervious to change and accused, 
on the other, of jumping on every bandwagon. Yet we should rejoice 
at this turn away from the stifling regulatory bureaucratic nature 
of earlier reform measures. We should welcome the freedom to change 
that is implicit in the SBM model. SBM is grassroots restructuring, 
a bottom-up approach that depends on the support of individual school 
councils by their adoption of reform ideas. SBM philosophy fits the 
considerable volume of educational literature on the change process. 
We know how to improve our schools. Our school system is one of 
outstanding repute. However, as I have quoted on more than one 
occasion, "To do better is better than doing one's best." SBM, our Project 
BESST, is the vehicle that will assist us in our journey to improve 
and to grow. 

In January, 1991 1 will direct all administrators to submit a five- 
year plan for their respective school or area of responsibility. Their 
plans will include: clearly stated goals; the principalship as a strong 
leadership position; staff empowerment; high expectations identified 
and maintained; student progress monitored; identification of the 
learning styles of students; intervention programs that can be activated 
to prevent a student from "dropping out;" school climate conducive 
to learning maintained; academic learning time increased; curriculum 
revised every five years as standard procedure; parent-community 
involvement a norm. 

Three years have passed since the Swampscott Learning System 
was formulated. The eleven components of this learning system are: 

Mission Statement 
Goals Rationale 
Comprehensive Concepts 
Performance Objectives 

Diagnostic Procedures and Evaluative Techniques 
Learning Activities 
Models of Teaching 
Multimedia/Sophisticated Technology 
Classroom Management 
Learning Environment 



160 



This year witnessed the introduction of an accountability 
component through utilization of a management-by-objectives process. 
Specific objectives achieved included the inclusion of staff in 
curriculum development teams, the revision of the Science Curriculum 
K-6, development of the Computer Curriculum through the efforts 
of the Educational Technology Committee, the revision of the Language 
Arts Curriculum, and the expansion of professional growth programs. 
All of these objectives, which were identified as priority objectives 
by the Superintendent of Schools, were achieved through the efforts 
of a dedicated and hard working professional staff. It should be noted 
that new textbooks were purchased to correlate with the new 
curriculum. 

Some specific objectives of the Superintendent of Schools for the 
School Year 1990-1991 are: 

Revision of the Mathematics Curriculum K-6 

Revision of the Music Curriculum K-12 

Revision of the Art Curriculum K-12 

Development of Curriculum (selected areas) 7-12 

Continued Efforts for the Full Implementation of the Middle 

School Concept 
Expansion of Professional Growth Programs 
Continued Efforts to Actualize Site-Based Management 

Two other objectives that must be achieved involve what will 
require a collaborative effort on the part of all professional staff and 
many community members. They are: 1) increased community 
involvement and participatory decision-making in decisions affecting 
the schools and 2) a fully operational, coUegial, clinical supervision 
program for the evaluation of both professional and nonprofessional 
staff. It continues to be my desire that the hallmark of my 
Superintendency be inclusion of all the stakeholders for the purpose 
of effectuating and maintaining a personalized self-learning 
environment for learners of all ages. These two objectives, when 
achieved, will be the capstones of an effective school system. 

If we as educators create a community of scholars, a community 
of intellectual challenge and stimulation, then we will have constructed 
an edifice recognized by all as a citadel for learning. I challenge those 
who claim that this period of retrogression, retreat, and reduction 
is not the best of times for visions and dreams. Let others "down size." 
My world is one of hope and optimism. We as educators cannot wait 
for better times because we work with the future every day. We must 
give to our youth that which they deserve. 



161 



Highlights 



Major efforts undertaken by the Central Office Administration 
and/or School Principals, collectively referred to as the 
Superintendency Team, included: 

• The Superintendent of Schools continued his effort to foster 
curriculum development and revision and to improve the quality 
of instructional services. As a result, 59 teachers and 
administrators worked in a series of summer workshops during 
the months of June, July, and August. These workshops enabled 
the practitioners to develop curriculum in English for grades 
7-12, and interdisciplinary programs in English and Social 
Studies 7-12. In addition. Science activities were developed and 
compiled within a booklet for use in grades K-6. Teachers 
representing all elementary schools undertook the development 
of a Language Arts Curriculum in all skill areas for grades K- 
6. Furthermore, two workshops for teachers of Mathematics 
grades 7-12 revised several Mathematics courses. 

• A workshop presented by Dr. Robert Gower of the University 
of Lowell, Massachusetts on effective teaching and coaching 
successfully involved in excess of 30 administrators and teachers 
in interactive participation to analyze the skills teachers 
currently possess, or can acquire, to improve the achievement 
of students. The workshop clearly demonstrated and reinforced 
the belief that a teacher's skill makes a difference in the 
performance of students. 

• A Gold Card Club for senior citizens was inaugurated. Senior 
members of the community were provided with a gold card which 
enabled them to attend all school-related functions at no cost. 

• Swampscott High School was evaluated by a visiting committee 
from the Commission on Public Secondary Schools on October 
14-17, 1990. The visiting committee was composed of colleagues 
from other schools. The purpose of the committee was to assist 
Swampscott High School in its efforts of self assessment which 
leads to the analysis of data gathered resulting in improved 
instructional programs provided for students. 

• Mrs. Martha Cesarz, Principal and Director of Learning, as one 
of her primary responsibilities as chairman of the Science 
Curriculum Committee K-6, worked with elementary teachers 
in the development of a comprehensive inquiry-based science 



162 



curriculum for grades K- 6. The curriculum was completed in 
July. It was implemented in September for the purpose of "field 
testing." A concomitant effort led to the development of science 
activities correlated with the curriculum, staff development 
activities for teaching staff, high school instructors providing 
in-service activities for elementary school teachers, and high 
school students serving in a tutorial role with elementary 
students. 

As the administrator responsible for the coordination of the 
Language Arts Curriculum K-6, Ms. Margaret Griffin 
energetically assumed the chairmanship of the Language Arts 
Committee K-6. Under her direction elementary school teachers 
created a "state of the art" Language Arts Curriculum K-6. It 
has been recognized as a model program and is being requested 
by other school systems. The teachers working with her are to 
be commended for their diligence and expertise. An additional 
responsibility which Ms. Griffin assumed was that of 
"demonstration teacher." Voluntarily she has visited all 
elementary schools and worked with teachers as a "coach" 
providing staff with new strategies in the teaching of Language 
Arts. 

Mr. Ronald Landman, Principal of Swampscott Middle School, 
undertook the goal of creating a student-centered learning 
environment within the Middle School. Establishing such a 
climate necessitated a new organizational structure. The 
elimination of levelling, tracking, development of inter- 
disciplinary teaching teams, block scheduling, team time, 
introduction of intramural programs, and inclusion of 
exploratory activities are but a few of the ingredients required 
of the Middle School Concept. It is anticipated that the School 
Committee will approve the move of the present fifth grade 
students to the Middle School for September, 1991. We recognize 
that change is unsettling for some individuals and that it is a 
lengthy process. Therefore, the Superintendent of Schools and 
Mr. Landman will be presenting a long-range plan containing 
a step-by-step approach to guarantee success for all middle school 
students. The schedule calls for the plan to be presented to the 
School Committee in January, 1991. 

An Educational Technology Committee chaired by Mrs. Sheridan 
Matthiesen, Principal/Director of Learning, presented to the 
School Committee on May 15, 1990 a document which included 
the philosophy of education of the Educational Technology 
Committee; goals, expectations, and implications for the years 



163 



1990-1993; information concerning hardware/software; a 
recommended copyright policy (accepted and approved by the 
Swampscott School Committee as official system policy after the 
"legal" two public readings); implications for staffing and report 
cards as well as an inventory of computer hardware and software 
presently within the school system. Once again the teaching staff 
of the "Swampscott" Public Schools must be commanded for this 
and many other efforts. This task, like so many, has been 
undertaken and completed on a voluntary basis by staff on their 
own time and without remuneration. 

• Mr. Richard Baker, Principal/Director of Learning/Director of 
Physical Education, Health and Athletics was the architect of 
the Swampscott Public Schools Extended Day Program in the 
Swampscott Schools. The model developed at the Clarke 
Elementary School was duplicated at the Machon and Hadley 
Elementary Schools this year and will be introduced at the 
Stanley Elementary School in September, 1991. In addition, Mr. 
Baker continues to nurture programs such as dance movement, 
drug awareness, high school peer leaders, Project Charlie, and 
the annual Jump Rope-a-Thon. 

• A major effort was undertaken this year to provide the 
community with any and all information concerning the budget 
building process, and in particular how resources are allocated. 
Mrs. Jacqueline Blanchard, Director of Personnel and Business 
Administration, in close cooperation with the Superintendent of 
Schools, engaged in a mutually collaborative and beneficial 
relationship with the Town Finance Committee. All information 
was provided members of the Finance Committee in order to 
assist them in their deliberations pertaining to the School 
Committee Budget. Mr. Gerard Perry, chairman, richly deserves 
commendation for his objective approach in working with 
members of the school system. It is also to be noted that for 
the first time ever each Town Meeting Member was provided 
with a copy of the Proposed FY 90-91 School Committee Budget 
in line item format. Mrs. Blanchard is entitled to an accolade 
for this achievement. 

Department of Pupil Personnel Services 

The Pupil Personnel Services Department continues to provide 
system-wide ancillary and support services to the students of 
Swampscott in the areas of Special Education, English as a Second 
Language, Health Services, and Screening. 



164 



i 



Special Education 

At present, 15.7% of our students or approximately 310 children 
receive some level of special education services. This figure is slightly 
lower than the state average and has been relatively consistent over 
the past several years. A further breakdown of the percentages finds 
18.5% of the elementary population having special needs. At the middle 
school, 13.8% of the students receive services. At the high school the 
percentage falls to 7.9% of the school population. 

Chapter 766, the Special Education Law in Massachusetts, 
mandates that the potential of special needs children be maximized 
and that they be educated in the least restrictive environment (LRE). 
The LRE is another term for mainstreaming or integration. 
Integrating special needs children into the mainstream of regular 
education has been a long-standing priority. There are various levels 
of integration - physical integration, social integration, academic 
integration, and community integration. Academic integration is what 
is most often referred to in Swampscott as appropriate for our students. 
Integration is more than a mere placement. It implies that the regular 
education teacher has primary responsibility for instruction. Special 
education staff supplies technical assistance, support, and direct 
instruction as student needs indicate. Educating children within the 
mainstream is a shared responsibility. This challenge requires hard 
work, training, and continuous modifications and revisions to meet 
children's needs. In Swampscott we are striving for purposeful 
integration and the vast majority of teachers are ready for the challenge 
of mainstreaming and are doing so very well. 

Special education programs have remained basically unchanged 
with the exception of the middle school program. At the middle school, 
all children are mainstreamed and receive support within the 
heterogeneous grouping of the regular classes. Special education 
teachers and their aides work with regular education teachers and 
students in the mainstream setting using a team teaching approach. 
Although a relatively new practice in Swampscott, the initial 
impressions from students, parents, and special educators indicate that 
this has had positive and beneficial effects on the students. 

Every other school building houses a resource room which serves 
children with mild to moderate special needs. A learning center is 
available at the primary, intermediate, and high school levels to serve 
those children with more substantial special needs. The learning 
centers offer some academic mainstreaming in addition to social and 
physical mainstreaming within regular education. The special needs 



165 



preschool is entering its second year as an integrated program. Speech 
therapy is provided by two full time pathologists at the elementary 
level. Because of the growing needs in this area, speech and language 
is provided at the preschool level, middle school, and high school on 
a contracted service basis. Occupational and physical therapy are 
provided to children with significant motor delays. Vision therapy 
is offered to a few children in our system who have acuity and sight 
problems. The school psychologist continues to provide cognitive and 
social- emotional assessments for children referred to special education 
for testing, direct counseling to students, and consultation to parents 
and teachers. A school psychology intern from Boston University has 
joined our system for practicum experience. 

The North Shore Special Education Consortium continues to use 
a room at the Hadley School for a program for young developmentally 
delayed children. Swampscott has two youngsters tuitioned into this 
program. A total of nine children are currently tuitioned to programs 
outside of the Swampscott School system. Such placements are 
necessary as the local programs are unable to meet the specific and 
unique needs of these children. 

The Swampscott Special Education Advisory Board (SEAboard) 
has developed into a viable and proactive parent group. The group 
acts as a support to the school system, staff members, and other parents. 
The group has successfully written its second Commonwealth Inservice 
Institute Grant in the amount of $3272.00. The funds will support 
programs and inservice training for parents and teachers in the area 
of fostering children's self-esteem. Other SEAboard activities include: 

• Participation in the annual Toys for Local Children effort 

• Development of tri-annual newsletter 

• Staff appreciation activities 

• Monthly meetings to address issues, share information, and learn 
more about special education 

• Assistance in kindergarten screening 

The new goals of the group include sensitizing children and adults 
to the issues surrounding special needs and learning disabilities and 
having all become more aware and accepting of individual differences. 
Another grant in the amount of $1000.00 is available to SEAboard 
to heighten awareness of special needs. 



166 



In addition to the aforementioned grants, the special education 
department has secured the following grants: 

• Commonwealth Inservice Institute $29,795.00 This grant, will 
allow for updated training in test administration and 
interpretation. The goal of the grant is to provide state of the 
art diagnostic measures in evaluating children for special needs. 

• Early Childhood Special Education Grant $13,050.00. This grant 
will continue to fund an additional aide for the special needs 
preschool in order to accommodate integrated children. Also, 
special programs on early childhood topics will be presented. 

• P.L. 94-142 (federal special education grant) $84,665.00 This 
federal entitlement funds a resource room teaching position and 
part-time school psychologist position. Funds are also used for 
inservice training programs, workshops, supplies, and materials. 

• P.L. 89-313 (federal special education grant) $8,450.00 This 
federal entitlement funds an aide position for the special needs 
preschool. 

Per Chapter 766 and federal regulations, every aspect of special 
education must be evaluated every three years. Federally funded 
programs must be evaluated annually. In 1990, the following programs 
were evaluated by Educational Specialists Associates of North 
Andover: 

• Resource Rooms 

• Learning Centers 

• Preschool Psychological Services 

• Health Services 

• Sped. Transportation 

• Progress Reports 

• Evaluation/Re-evaluation/Annual Review Process 

• Screening 

The evaluation consisted of collecting data through interviews with 
staff, review of files, review of forms and paperwork, and 
questionnaires completed by parents, regular educators, special 
educators, and administrators. The findings were very positive and 
identified several areas of commendation, primarily the expertise of 
special and regular educators and the improved procedures, processes, 
and paperwork within the special education department. Specific 
recommendations for program improvement were noted, in particular, 
better communication among specialists, classroom teachers and 



167 



parents. Parents expressed a desire to see more mainstream ing and 
more inservice education to support mainstreaming, A special 
education task force will be developed to address these issues and 
other issues relevant to special education. A full report is on file in 
the special education office. 

English as a Second Language 

There has been a steady stream of foreign-speaking students 
enrolling in our system from kindergarten through grade 12. Over 
the course of the year, approximately 25 students received the services 
of an ESL tutor. The majority of students were Russian born and 
have recently immigrated to the United States. Other areas of the 
world being represented in Swampscott include Central America and 
South America. As students enroll in our school system, the ESL tutor 
evaluates their level of English proficiency including oral language, 
written language, and reading. Many students have had little or no 
prior instruction in English. Other students have had years of English 
instruction in their home country. The degree and level of English 
proficiency dictates the amount of tutorial services provided. Most 
students receive daily tutoring. Some students are seen only once or 
twice per week. The ESL program was supported last year by a healthy 
budget which allowed for the purchase of appropriate supplies and 
materials for the first time. 

Health Services 

School health services are provided by two full-time registered 
nurses. One nurse is responsible for the middle school and high school 
while the other nurse divides time between the four elementary schools. 
The school nurses provide comprehensive health services and 
emergency care to students and staff members. 

The school nurses are additionally responsible for maintaining 
student health records, providing medical consultation to parents, and 
overseeing medical clinics. Annual screening clinics have been held 
for vision, hearing, scoliosis, blood pressure, and lead poisoning. Dental 
and immunization clinics have also been held. 

Additionally, the nurses assist with physical exams provided to 
our student athletes. Lastly, the school nurses have been active 
participants in the special education team evaluation process, 
conducting home/family assessments that provide educationally 
relevant developmental and medical histories. 



168 



Should financial resources become available, it would be 
recommended that the school nursing staff be increased. The increase 
in staffing would allow for increased medical coverage at each of the 
six schools and would allow the nurses to function as "teaching" nurses, 
providing direct instruction for our students in the medical and health 
issues of the 1990's. 

Screening 

Several formal educational screening programs are conducted 
annually. A screening is a brief battery of tests assessing a child's 
overall development. The purpose of a screening is to determine if 
special needs may exist that would hinder a child's ultimate school 
achievement. 

Kindergarten screening is required by special education laws for 
all children first entering kindergarten. The areas assessed include: 
speech, language, cognition, fine motor, gross motor, visual perception, 
auditory perception, vision and hearing. Last spring, approximately 
185 students were screened for kindergarten. The screening teams 
in each school consist of the guidance counselor, resource room teachers, 
kindergarten teachers, speech pathologists, and school nurse. 

The METCO screening occurs in the late spring and early fall 
of each year. Last year nine potential candidates were screened for 
acceptance into the Swampscott METCO program. Children are 
eligible for enrollment as METCO students in grade one. The screening 
team consists of the resource room teachers, remedial reading teachers, 
and speech pathologists. 

Preschool screening is available at several points during the school 
year or at parent's request. This screening is for three and four year 
olds. The purpose and content is similar to the kindergarten screening 
program. Eight preschool children were screened in 1990. 

Guidance and Counseling 

Guidance and counseling services are provided to students through 
the Department of Guidance under the direction of Mr. John McDevitt, 
Director of Guidance K-12. The restructuring of the department 
allowed for an increase of counseling services at the elementary level. 

The Hadley and Stanley Elementary Schools have counselors 
available three days a week, while the Clarke and Machon have 
counselors providing services two days of the week. The services in 



169 



the elementary schools include both group counseling (developmental 
as well as specific issues groups) and individual counseling services 
for all children K-6. Crisis intervention assistance is also provided 
as need dictates. Other services provided by elementary counselors 
include coordination of the California Test for Basic Skills Program 
and ongoing consultations with parents regarding their children's 
academic progress as well as the children's psychological/development. 
An interesting aspect of the elementary program is the evening parent 
grade orientation with all members of the staff. 

In the past year the guidance counselors visited all six grade classes i 
in five elementary schools (the four Swampscott elementary schools ' 
as well as the Johnston School in Nahant). Accompanying the guidance 
counselor to the elementary schools were peer leaders from the high 
school. In addition, school group orientations were provided all grade 
7 and grade 8 students. | 

In the Middle School, as in all schools, the guidance counselors 
are coordinators of all testing. This involves ordering, distribution and 
collection of materials, make-up testing, and assisting administrators 
with teacher scheduling. Test interpretation is a service provided by . 
guidance. Mr. W. Eric Warne, Middle School counselor, has noted | 
that staff contact in regards to student issues has been greatly enhanced 
due to the Middle School format which includes teacher teams. ; 
Information can be easily exchanged with teachers because of the | 
teaming structure. 

At Swampscott High School, as in all schools, guidance and 
counseling programs function to assist all pupils in: 1) assessing and 
understanding their abilities, aptitudes, interests, and educational 
needs; 2) increasing their understanding of educational and | 
occupational opportunities and requirements; 3) helping them make 
the best possible use of these opportunities through the formulation 
and achievement of realistic goals.; 4) helping pupils maintain normal 
personal-social adjustment; and 5) providing information useful to the 
professional staff, parents, and community in planning and evaluating 
the school's total program. 

A new concept in post high school planning was developed by 
Mr. John McDevitt, Director of Guidance, and Mr. Donald Lucia and 
Ms. Judith Pressler, High School counselors. Swampscott has always 
been a traditionally college-oriented community with 85 per cent to 
90 per cent of the high school graduates going on to traditional colleges. 
However, in an effort to serve not only the students of the high school 
who do not want to attend the traditional two or four-year college, 



170 



but also the adults of Swampscott and surrounding communities, a 
Technical and Career School Fair was held at Swampscott High School 

on October 25 from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Over 40 schools and/or institutes 
participated. Following is a representative sampling: 

Blaine Beauty School 
Barbizon School of Modeling 
Boston Teaching Hospitals - Health Care Careers 
North Bennett Street School 
Burdett Business College 
Essex Agriculture and Technical School 
Hallmark Institute of Photography 
The Elizabeth Grady School of Aesthetics 
The Culinary Institute of New Hampshire 
New England Institute of Technology 
Mount Ida: Veterinary Technician, Nutrition, and Fitness 
Management 

Southern Maine Vocational and Technical Institute 
Travel Education Center 

University of Massachusetts (The Stockbridge School) 
Women's Technical Institute 
Wentworth Institute of Technology 

Communities invited to attend the Career and Technical Fair were: 
Lynn, Salem, Marblehead, Beverly, Peabody, Wakefield, Danvers, 
Reading, Hamilton, Amesbury, Newburyport, Byfield, Manchester 
and Ipswich. 

The Clarke, Hadley, Machon and Stanley 
Elementary Schools 

The School Year 1989-1990 was a very active one. An ever- 
increasing number of staff and students engaged themselves in a 
myriad of student learning activities and professional staff 
development programs. As a result the instructional dimension of the 
school system witnessed the inauguration of new and exciting strategies 
and models to enhance the teaching and learning of students. A 
representative sampling of these strategies and models follow: 

• Teachers throughout the system enrolled in a wide variety of 
inservice programs in order to familiarize themselves with many 
of the new models of instruction in writing, mathematics, reading, 
computers, and the middle school concept. 



171 



The Extended Kindergarten and After School Programs under 
the direction of Ms. Deborah Gallant met with great success 
at the Clarke Elementary School. This program is a result of 
the school system's response to our changing society. With both 
parents employed, schools must respond in a "caring" fashion 
and adopt schedules that provide a safe haven for children until 
their working parents can be with them. 

Mrs. Francine Goldstein, who was appointed to the position of 
Reading Coordinator K-12, was instrumental in conducting two 
successful programs at the Clarke School. The first was a 
Summer Reading Incentive Program READS - "Reading 
Everything and Devouring Sundaes" (Sundaes courtesy of Mr. 
Winneger of Dale's) and a second program, "Book Swap." All 
children were given the opportunity to bring in books they had 
read and exchange them for books they had not read. The 
program met with great success and will be repeated next year. 

The Machon professional staff, under the direction of Mrs. 
Sheridan Matthiesen, Principal, commenced the development of 
a five-year plan along with parent/community members. The 
initial effort required that a needs assessment be undertaken 
for the purpose of identifying strengths and weaknesses of the 
Machon learning environment. Following an analysis of data 
gathered, goals and objectives will be identified for the School 
Year 1990-1991. The goals and values agreed upon included: 

• Achieve competence in basic learning skills and processes 

• Accept the responsibility of citizenship actions and practices 

• Demonstrate self-respect and self-discipline 

• Communicate thoughts and ideas through a variety of means 

• Pursue designs in learning through less homogeneous 
grouping, greater cooperative strategies, and application of 
higher order/critical thinking skills 

During American Education Week Congressman Nicholas 
Mavroules visited the Machon Elementary School and was 
interviewed by several Machon students. Interestingly, his 
presence at the school was but one of many activities that 
expanded the role of the recently formed Leopard Leaders of 
Machon. This group is composed of sixth grade students who 
serve in a leadership capacity within the school. 



172 



As a result of the physical move of the Office of the 
Superintendent of Schools "nd the Swampscott School 
Committee, the administrative arm of the school system was 
finally in compliance with federal law which stipulates that such 
offices must be accessible to the physically handicapped. With 
"new" space available at the Hadley Elementary School, Ms. 
Gail Anderson, Ms. Margaret Halloran, and Ms. Barbara Dee 
established a Science Discovery Room that has proved to be a 
model for the other elementary schools in Swampscott. 

Students throughout the school system embarked on a campaign 
to write letters and send gifts to all American troops presently 
stationed in Saudi Arabia due to the "crisis in the Middle East." 
In the months of November and December many students 
received letters from their "buddies" in the armed services. 

Stanley School adopted a multicultural theme entitled "Around 
the World in 180 Days." This year the goal was to create in 
children an increased awareness and acceptance of individual 
differences through a combined exposure to various cultural 
programs. Funded by the Parent Teacher Organization, the 
increased emphasis on teaching about cultural diversity resulted 
in children coming to treat their peers with increased respect. 

Students at the Stanley Elementary School initiated a project 
with the Hood School in Lynn. Hood is a multicultural magnet 
school and, thus, provided our students with the opportunity to 
correspond with children of all races and cultures. Teachers 
communicated by way of a telecommunication "hook-up" with 
Gordon College in Wenham. Teachers and students exchanged 
messages via a computer telephone system. 

Mrs. Sheridan Matthiesen, Principal/Director of Learning of the 
Machon School, was accepted as a participant in The 
Commonwealth Leadership Academy's Leadership Institute on 
Curriculum Leadership. The Institute is designed to assist school 
administrators enhance their leadership skills in improving 
instruction and educational services in their schools. Mrs. 
Matthiesen is required to develop an action plan which 
conceptualizes and describes the significant goals she wishes to 
focus on over the next three years. 

Principal/Director of Learning Margaret Griffin of the Hadley 
Elementary School was the recipient of the Sylvia D. Brown 
Scholarship Award. This prestigious recognition was presented 
to her by the Massachusetts Reading Association. 



173 



Swampscott Middle School 



On May 22, 1990 the Swampscott School Committee unanimously 
endorsed the concept of Middle School and voted to implement a Middle 
School organization for grades seven and eight in September, 1990. 
Mr. Ronald Landman, as Principal of the Middle School, was delegated 
the responsibility by the Superintendent of Schools to effectuate the 
School Committee's vote for students in grades seven and eight. It 
was determined that a decision to include grade six students in the 
middle school configuration would be made in January, 1991. Mr. 
Landman began his planning within the framework of the policies 
and goals established by the School Committee and the Superintendent 
of Schools. The planning process required defining specific needs, 
establishing objectives, generating alternative paths, analyzing the 
alternatives, and selecting the optimum. In operationalizing a new 
middle school, or as in the case of Swampscott, moving a traditional 
junior high school to a middle school, certain steps and organizational 
changes are needed. The school must come to reflect: 

• Greater individualized/personalized programs to account for di- 
versity in the personality, ability, and acceptance of each student. 

• Maximum, active participation by the student in the learning 
process. 

• Adoption of a "culture" among all staff of an acceptance in initia- 
ting, evaluating, and modifying curriculum and instructional 
programs - in fact, increasing time on task for higher academic 
achievement. 

• A more flexible and efficient use of personnel and facilities 

Recognizing that change affects individuals in a variety of ways 
every effort was made to involve staff, community, parents, and 
administrators in understanding the middle school concept and the 
components contained within such a system. However, more staff 
development programs must be provided as well as parent seminars 
to keep all those affected by the decision knowledgeable as to the status 
of the process of transformation and to assist in identifying strengths 
as well as weaknesses, in order that those weaknesses can be addressed 
and corrected. 

• All faculty participated in computer workshops in order that 
the system-wide objective of integrating computers into daily 
instruction can be accomplished. 



174 



• English teachers under the direction of Mr. Donald Babcock, 
Department Chairman, participated in a summer workshop in 
order that a smooth transition from a traditional structure to 
a flexible structure could be achieved. 

• The Mathematics Department, under the aegis of Mr. Carl Jack, 
Department Head, used grant money to conduct several 
workshops for mathematics teachers to ensure coordination 
between the middle school and the high school. 

• Seventh grade students were assigned "Reading" for six days 
per six day cycle - an increase of three days per cycle. Three 
days are scheduled with teacher instruction and three days for 
"reading in silence." 

• Study periods were eliminated. 

• Team-Time was created, thus, building into the schedule "time" 
for remediation, accelerated studies, and enrichment. Band and 
Chorus were scheduled during this period. 

• Heterogeneous grouping replaced homogeneous grouping in 
English, Social Studies, and Science. 

Swampscott High School 

The instructional program offered by the staff continues to deliver 
a strong, comprehensive education for all high school students. Every 
year programs are added, deleted, modified, or revised in order that 
we respond to our clients. The list which follows contains changes, 
by department, that occurred in 1990: 

Curriculum and Program Highlights 

English 

• A new Writing Laboratory was instituted where all students 
have the opportunity to further develop their writing skills under 
the supervision of a member of the English Department on new 
word processing equipment. 

English/Social Studies 

• An American Studies Program was developed combining a 2- 
level junior English and United States History course taught 
by both Ms. Joanna Defeo and Mr. Jon Flanagan. 



175 



Mathematics 

• Courses for students experiencing difficulty in mathematics were 
expanded and their content clarified and revised under the 
direction of first-year department chair, Mr. Carlton Jack. 

World Languages 

• A new course, Essentials of Spanish I, was offered to students 
who wish to pursue a two-year sequence. Essentials of Spanish 
II will be available for 1991-1992. 

• Latin is enjoying an amazing resurgence of interest! 
Science 

• This year all lab science classes met daily with a double lab 
period once a cycle resulting in a 16 per cent increase in science 
instruction for all students enrolled in all lab science courses. 

• Advanced Plancement Physics and Calculus were scheduled to 
meet in a block of 15 periods every six days providing more 
classroom time in both areas. 

Practical Arts 

• Exploratory Industrial Arts was restored to a full-year course. 

• Math courses for the non-college bound student were increased 
and expanded. 



Fine Arts 

• Four new art courses were added to the Program of Studies 

• Introduction to Painting 

• Introduction to Sculpture 

• Introduction to Graphic Design 

• Introduction to Photography 

• The chorus saw an amazing growth from no chorus in 1987- 
1988 to seven students the following year, to fourteen students 
last year. This year twenty-five students were enrolled. 



176 



In addition, other decisions were made which will positively impact 
education at Swampscott High School. Three courses are offered on 
a Pass/Fail basis. They are: 

• Introduction to Computers 

• Personal Typing 

• Personal Word Processing 

Following an extensive review of our unweighted class ranking 
system, we chose to include all courses in the calculation of a student's 
Grade Point Average and Rank-in-class with the exception of Physical 
Education, Health, Reading, Study Skills, S.A.T. Preparation, and 
Resource room. All other courses previously excluded are now included. 

Major Improvements in Equipment, Building, and Grounds 

1990 was a year in which significant improvement was seen 
regarding the physical environment of Swampscott High School. 
Among those changes were: 

• The intercommunication system from room to room and from 
classroom to office was brought to full utilization. 

• All lockers in the Roger Wing were electrostatically painted a 
uniform color providing a clean, fresh look to the entire Roger 
Wing. Missing and/or damaged locker doors were replaced. 

• Damaged ceiling tiles were replaced throughout the building. 

• Roof leaks were repaired. 

• Extensive interior painting was done throughout the building. 

• The interior and exterior of the elevator was electrostatically 
painted. 

• All library furniture was upgraded as follows: 

• Tables resurfaced and strengthened 

• All chairs were strengthened 

• Easy chairs were reupholstered 

• A new display case was constructed in an area vacated by lockers 
which were moved to the Roger Wing. 



177 



• Damaged counter tops in Shaw Wing classes were replaced. 

• A new lighting system was installed in the Little Theatre 

The above described work created a much improved working 
environment and learning atmosphere which heightened the morale 
of the teachers and increased a sense of pride among the student body. 

Major or Interesting Events 

During the course of any school year, in addition to the daily 
routine of the school, there are significant events, activities, and 
accomplishments which stand out as marking one year as distinct 
from the rest. In 1990, there were numerous such instances. Included 
among them were the following: 

January 

• The Parent-Teacher Forum presented a tribute to Martin Luther 
King. 

• The High School Bands and Chorus participated in the Annual 
Winter Music Concert. 

• The Sophomore Class conducted a ski trip to Mount Stratton. 

• The Drama Club presented its production of "The Bad Seed." 

• Monthly release days were held to allow the professional staff 
to work on the self-study phase of the accreditation process. 

February 

• Swampscott High students who were members of the political 
Action Club participated in the Harvard Model Congress. 

• The Student Council conducted their annual Carnation Sale on 
Valentine's Day. 

• Swampscott High Senior Stacy Klickstein received an honorable 
mention award from the Jewish War Veterans of Massachusetts 
at the annual "Classmates Today - Neighbors Tomorrow" 
breakfast. 

• The Guidance Department conducted a successful Medical 
Careers Day. 

March 

• The Junior class went on a weekend ski trip. 

• The Winter Boosters Sports Award program was conducted. 

• The annual senior show was presented. 



178 



• S.U.C.C.E.S.S., Swampscott's Lx)cal Education Foundation, 
continued to make progress in its efforts to explore fund raising 
activities. 

• The Animal Rights Club sponsored a highly successful fund 
raising concert at the Middle School auditorium. 

• The Drama Club participated in the annual Boston Globe High 
School Drama Festival. 

• The annual visit of two Israeli students was held and our students 
had the opportunity to learn first hand about life in Israel. 

• The Parent Teacher Forum ran an evening program for teachers 
and parents on the topic: "Teacher Evaluation." 

• The Animal Rights Club conducted a "Meat Out" Day. 

• School Committee members visited the high school to discuss 
the issue of rank-in-class with interested students. 

• Swampscott High School was visited by the band from Red Hook 
(New York) Central High School. 

• The Annual Hogan Party for the mentally retarded was 
coordinated through the efforts of the Special Programs Office. 

April 

• The High School Spring Concert was presented in the Little 
Theatre. 

• Swampscott High School students conducted a Mock Town 
Meeting. 

• The Junior Prom was held at the Danversport Yacht club in 
Danvers. 

• The Junior class presented their annual Variety Show. 

• Students for Social Responsibility conducted an Awareness Day 
at Swampscott High School. 

May 

• Nine Swampscott High School seniors were recognized for 
academic excellence at the annual Honor Scholars Night 
sponsored by the North Shore Chamber of Commerce. 

• Students participated in the annual Walk-for-Hunger. 

• The Student Council conducted another successful Blood Drive 
for the American Red Cross. 

• The Fine Arts Department presented its annual Fine Arts 
Festival. 

• The Annual Underclassmen Student Recognition Ceremony was 
held in the high school gym. 

• The Senior Prom was held at the new Peabody Marriott. 

• The Special Programs Office sponsored a Vietnam Veterans 



179 



Awareness Day. 

Swampscott High School opened its doors to the public in a new, 
during-the-school-day Open House. 

The Athletic Department presented a First Aid/Injury Night 
for Swampscott's school and town coaches. 
An evening orientation meeting was held for parents to review 
the course selection process. 

The Drama Club presented its first-ever musical "Guys and 
Dolls." 

Swampscott High School students, under the direction of the 
Class of 1992, held its first-ever "Senior Citizen Appreciation 
Day." 

Swampscott High School hosted the Swampscott Rotary Club 
at a luncheon held in the cafeteria with Massachusetts 
Commissioner of Education Harold Raynolds as the featured 
speaker. 

The Sophomore Class participated in a Harbor Cruise in Boston 
Harbor. 

Seniors were recognized for outstanding achievement and 
participation at the Annual Senior Banquet and Awards 
Presentation at the Marblehead Elks Club. 

June 

Graduation exercises for the Class of 1990 were held at Blocksidge 
Field followed by a reception for all teachers K-12 in the High 
School Cafeteria, 

The Band presented its annual Pops concert in the High School 
Cafeteria. 

The Spring Boosters Awards Program and Cookout was held 
in the High School Cafeteria. 

The Senior Class went on a "mystery outing" to Cedardale in 
Groveland. 

Grade 8 students visited Swampscott High School to familiarize 

themselves with their future new surroundings. 

The Freshman Class celebrated the end of final exams by going 

on a class trip to Canobie Lake Park. 

Swampscott voted to override Proposition 2;^. 

September 

Varsity Sports Captains held an evening meeting for all athletes 
to discuss school and state athletic rules. 

Swampscott High School announced the names of four National 
Merit Semi-finalists and six Commended Students. 



180 



The Annual Fall All-Sports Rally opened the fall sports season 
with great excitement and enthusiasm. 

The School Committee and Student Council hosted a reception 
for the custodial and maintenance crew to thank them for their 
extraordinary efforts during the summer months in preparing 
the schools for the opening of school in September. 

October 

Swampscott High School welcomed approximately 400 parents 
to its Annual Open House. 

The 14th Annual Swampscott-Marblehead College Fair was held 
in the Marblehead High School Gym. 

Swampscott High School mourned the loss of long-time teacher 
and friend, Michael J. Spencer, by closing school on the day 
of his funeral. 

Swampscott High School Football was featured during a halftime 
show of a TV telecast on Turner Network Television. 
Swampscott High School hosted the 14 member Visiting 
Committee from the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges for four days in the second phase of the accreditation 
process. 

A release day program dealing with "stress management" was 
conducted for the high school faculty. 

The Guidance Department offered its first ever Career and 
Technical Fair. 

The Sophomore Class held a Halloween Haunted House for 
elementary school-aged children. 

Under the auspices of the special Programs Office, dozens of 
high school students in costume visited North Shore Children's 
Hospital and Salem Hospital. 

November 

November marked the official kickoff of the Toys for Local 
Children Campaign. 

Thirty-one students were inducted into the National Honor 
Society. 

The Parent Teacher Forum conducted a program on drug and 
alcohol use by high school aged students. 

The Guidance Program "Playing the Selective College 
Admissions Game" was offered to interested parents. 
Freshmen visited Washington, D.C. accompanied by their 
American Government teachers. 
The Senior Class Spirit Dance ushered in Spirit Week. 



181 



• The Second Annual "Cafe Night" was presented to an enthusiastic 
audience. 

• A special AIDS Awareness Program and Photographic Exhibit 
was presented to all Swampscott High School students, as 
arranged by Mrs. Rotner, Chairman of the School Committee. 

• The National Honor Society Induction Ceremony was recreated 
for the Freshman Class during the school day. 

• Swampscott High School students penned letters to servicemen 
in the Persian Gulf as part of the "Helping at Home" Program. 

• The opera "Rigoletto" played to an enthusiastic student audience. 

December 

• The Guidance Department offered its Annual Financial Aid 
Night The Boosters Club honored its Fall Athletes at its triannual 
awards program. 

• College freshmen returned to Swampscott High School to discuss 
"The Freshman Experience" with high school seniors. 

• The International Relations Club conducted its two-day Model 
United Nations. 

• The Drama Club presented its production of "Up the Down 
Staircase." 

• Amnesty International conducted a Human Rights Day. 

• High school faculty participated in an early release day program 
which assisted them in infusing service-learning activities into 
their classes. 

School Buildings and Grounds 

The physical plant of each school is showing the years of neglect 
and the lack of maintenance. All the schools are in need of masonry 
work, ceiling repair, painting, improved electrical service, and locker 
replacement. Repeating my statement of last year, "Increased funding 
must be forthcoming in order that our schools remain safe and secure 
for the student body and the staff." Furthermore, I earnestly request 
that monies be made available in order that the Middle School and 
the Hadley School be made accessible to the physically handicapped. 

The following list identifies projects undertaken in each school: 

High School 

• Asbestos removal was accomplished on boilers, breaching, and 
pipes in boiler room and each area reinsulated. 

• Painting program in all classrooms continued. 



182 



• Lockers electrostatically repainted 

• A small roof was replaced with a new rubber roof, 

• Gym lighting was replaced by Massachusetts Electric. 

• A new light panel was installed in the Little Theatre. 

Middle School 

• Asbestos removal was accomplished on boilers, breaching, pipes, 
janitor's room, Room 10, fan room, second floor, cafeteria and 
kitchen, teachers' lounge, music room, and each area reinsulated. 

• Rooms 301, 302, 303 in the Middle School were renovated. 

• One hundred and thirty-four light fixtures were changed by 
Massachusetts Electric. 

• A new flag pole was donated to the school and installed. 

• A new fence in back of the gym was purchased and installed 
through the efforts of volunteers and their fund raising. 

Clarke School 

• Overhauled steam traps. 
Hadley School 

• Asbestos was removed in the following areas: fan room, pipe 
insulation under corridor hall near library. Room 306, Room 
301 (closet), and reinsulation took place. 

• Replaced two burners on boilers. 

• Painting program continued. 

• Replaced hot water heater. 

• Classrooms were established in the old Business Office and Pupil 
Personnel Services offices. 

• New steam traps were installed. 

Machon School 

• Asbestos repair was accomplished on pipes, boiler, and 
breaching. 

• Replaced two burners on boilers. 

• New steam traps were installed. 

• New light fixtures were installed by Massachusetts Electric. 
Stanley School 

• Asbestos removal was completed in the boiler room, from pipes, 
from boiler, and from breaching in the custodian room. 



183 



• Two new boilers and burners were installed and complete 
reinsulation accomplished. 

• New steam traps were installed. 

• New electric panels were installed. 

• New liprht fixtures were installed by Massachusetts Electric. 

• A new drop ceiling and lighting was installed on the first floor 
and in the new wing classrooms and corridors. 

• The painting program continued. 

• New windows were installed on the back part of the new wing. 

Recommendations 

As I close my fourth annual report I reaffirm my belief that we 
must continue to expand the concept of participatory decision-making. 
All those to be affected by a decision must be engaged in the process 
of making that decision. Furthermore, consideration must be given 
to the establishment of school site management. Finally, the principal, 
as instructional leader, must "lead" staff and students in his/her school 
community each and every day of the year. 

The School Year 1989-1990 witnessed professional staff delivering 
to students a myriad of services and activities to an increasingly diverse 
student body. These efforts remained undiminished throughout the 
year, even when confronted with diminished financial support an 
incredibly resilient teaching staff served the students. This year saw 
enrollment on the rise in the elementary schools, a harbinger of 
increased enrollment at all levels, thus, necessitating requests for 
additional staff next year and in the years following. This diversity 
and increased enrollment serve as guideposts as we continue to make 
our instructional program better and better. The recommendations 
which follow are the same as I provided last year. Our needs remain 
the same. 

Recommendation One. A Learner Responsive School System is 
our top priority. As more and more data reveal the changing family 
patterns and the altered nature of society and its values, we must 
respond by considering the need for: 

• Expansion of English as a Second Language Program. 

• Transitional kindergarten centers in each elementary school 
Self-sustaining day care centers in each elementary school. 

• Utilization of sophisticated technology, i.e. satellite learning, 
teleconferencing, interactive video and voice activated 
computer systems. 



184 



Every effort must be made to individualize and personalize the 
teaching/learning process in order to respond to an everchanging, more 
mobile student body. 

Recommendation Two. All individuals to be affected by a 
decision should be given the opportunity to participate, if they desire, 
in the process of making that decision. This is required if we wish 
to maintain a high level of morale and a productive learning 
environment. 

Recommendation Three. Management Information Systems. An 
increased use of high technology can result in instantaneous retrieval 
of data. Such information will lead to improved decision making which 
enables us to maintain an effective and efficient delivery system of 
instructional services. 

Recommendation Four. Accountability. The management -by- 
objective process will continue to be the preferred mode of 
management. The Superintendent of Schools has met with each central 
office administrator and building principal in order that mutually 
agreed upon objectives are established and achieved. All 
administrators are evaluated on their performance against the criteria 
established in the MBO conferences. Furthermore, the School 
Committee has received as part of their budget documentation the 
goals and objectives of the Administration for a three-year period. 
Finally, It should be noted that the Superintendent of Schools has 
his performance evaluated in an "open session" of a School Committee 
meeting. Nonetheless, as long as there persists even just one "doubting 
individual" who questions the veracity and/or performance of the school 
system leadership we will continue to make every effort to convey 
and to prove the "openness" of this administration. 

Recommendation Five. Curriculum/Instruction. The 
appointment of elementary school Principals/Directors of Learning 
and the funding, though extremely limited, of workshops as requested 
by social studies and language arts staff has resulted in an analysis 
of our computer, social studies, science, writing, reading, and fine 
arts curricula. The establishment of Curriculum Committees at the 
elementary level is the prelude to curriculum revision and textbook 
adoption/replacement. The same can be said of the establishment of 
a Curriculum Planning Team composed of all chairpersons of the 
various departments 7-12. 

Recommendation Six. A vital component of the teaching/ 
learning process is the provision of professional growth and in-service 



185 



programs for all staff based on identified needs by the staff, and 
mandated policies. The Swampscott Public School system, if it is to 
maintain its reputation as one of the leading school systems, must 
receive sufficient funding to enable it to provide the most up-to-date 
staff development workshops. 

Recommendation Seven. Changes in Society. Continuous 
scanning of the environment is an absolute necessity if we are to survive 
as a viable, productive school system. As an "open system" it is our 
responsibility to respond to the external environment and when 
necessary adapt, modify, and revise. 

Recommendation Eight. Plant. As I stated last year, the physical 
plant is in need of major renovation and repair. Items in need of 
maintenance have too long been ignored. These items represent an 
anticipated expenditure of one to one and a half million dollars. 

Conclusion 

In bringing closure to my annual report to the citizens of 
Swampscott, I recall the support which I have received from the staff 
of the Swampscott Public Schools and the citizens of the Town of 
Swampscott. I am deeply appreciative and thankful for all they have 
done for the children, for the town, and for me personally. I am most 
fortunate in that I work for a School Committee that is comprised 
of individuals who care deeply for each and every child and respect 
learning. I am honored to associate with colleagues who are aware 
of the faith which parents have in them and who strive mightily to 
provide programs of merit and value. It is a staff that is "driven" 
to achieve the impossible because they possess the attributes of 
commitment and integrity. And lastly, I express my gratitude to the 
parents and other members of the community who worked with great 
diligence to override Proposition 2]^ and gave us "breathing room" 
to continue our move forward. 

It is my intention to continue energetically in my quest and that 
of my colleagues to achieve our mission - Fulfilling the Goal of 
Excellence. It must be noted, however, that the present status of our 
economy portends difficult times ahead. Funding is still inadequate 
and as I stated last year, "quality learning programs and exemplary 
instructional services do not come without some financial cost." 

Some of our detractors contend that declining, enrollments should 
result in declining budgets. It is not true. First we are in a period 
of increasing enrollment, and second the rising cost of materials, 

186 



resources, labor, fuel, energy, etc., necessitate additional funds - if 
only to stand still. 

As Superintendent of Schools I have a moral obligation and duty 
to make every effort to provide a program of learning excellence for 
the most cherished of resources, our children. They are our future. 
I promise you my continued commitment to this duty. 

I will close by inserting in my report the quote which follows. 
It was published in the April, 1990 issue of "Educational Leadership" 
and was authored by principal Barry Raeback of Virginia. I am in 
concert with its message. 

"Classrooms are windows to the world: Students are in 
and out of classrooms regularly. The earth is the laboratory. 
The schoolroom an adjunct. 

"Teachers are co-learners and facilitators as much as 
lecturers and experts: Technology abounds, and so does 
laughter. Instruction is never 'delivered' as if knowledge 
came by UPS. Rather, knowledge is acquired, grasped, 
played with, modified, questioned, challenged, used, 
discarded, and reacquired. Knowledge is a teaching/ 
learning process — not something static in a book. Wisdom 
is something far less quantifiable still. 

"There are many ways to learn: Students work 
individually, in pairs, in small groups, and in large groups, 
depending on the action. Sometimes there is competition, 
sometimes autonomy, sometimes cooperation. Often the 
students teach each other - and even the teacher. There is 
much to be learned from young people when we allow it 
to come forth. 

"Students should be treated with respect: We treat our 
students as we ourselves would like to be treated, in an 
atmosphere of wholeness, freshness, interdisciplinary 
exploration, joy, risk taking, color, variety, light, sound, art, 
music, movement creativity, intensity, challenge — and the 
firm belief in everyone's always doing one's best." 



187 



Swampscott Traffic Study Committee — 1990 



The Swampscott Traffic Study Committee now has three members 
plus an ex- officio member from the Police Department. 

While traffic volume is still our major concern, no large 
developments have been initiated during 1990 to add to the problem. 
We will be watching with interest changes proposed for the 
Swampscott Mall. 

We will continue to attend meetings of the Board of Appeals and 
the Planning Board when proposals that affect traffic are considered. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William H. McCarty, Chairman 
Louise M. LaConte, Secretary 
Michael A. Palleschi 
George Gately, Ex-Officio 

Veterans Services 

Memorial Day 

On May 30 at 10:00 a.m. Memorial Services began with an outdoor 
Mass in St. John the Evangelist parking lot. Monsignor Carroll was 
the main celebrant and gave his usual inspirational sermon. 

Upon completion of the Mass, the delegation from the VFW Post 
1240, units from the State National Guard and Public Officials 
participated in the decoration of memorials at the various locations 
on Monument Avenue. 

Reverend Slater of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater 
Lynn in Swampscott gave the Invocation and Benediction. 

The procession then proceeded to the Swampscott Cemetery where 
rituals, prayers and decoration of the graves concluded the day's 
ceremonies. 

An Open House was held at the VFW Post 1240 on Pine Street 
immediately following the Memorial Services and ceremonies. 



188 



Veterans Day 

On Sunday, November 11 at 11:00 a.m. appropriate ceremonies 
were held at the World War I monument on Monument Avenue. 

Invocation and Benediction was given by VFW Post 1240 
Commander Fred Fried. 

Board of Selectmen Chairman Robert E. Perry and Selectman 
Daniel R. Santanello addressed the gathering on behalf of the Town 
followed by a military ritual conducted by a firing squad. Taps 
concluded the ceremony. 

An Open House was held immediately following the ceremony 
at VFW Post 1240 Headquarters on Pine Street. 

During my attendance at several meetings of the Northern 
Massachusetts Association and the Mid Winter Conference of the 
Massachusetts Veterans Services Association, I observed the concern 
of many Veterans Agents over the fact that some important veterans 
entitlements were being scaled down, i.e., the possibility of the closing 
of the Chelsea and Holyoke Veterans Hospitals were being considered. 

However, at a rally of veterans on the State House steps in October 
the veterans were assured by candidates and future State office holders 
that the hospitals would not be closed. 

The year closed on a somber financial note, however, this 
department will attempt to continue to serve the veterans and the 
Town in as efficient manner as possible. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Charles H. Popp 
Veterans Agent 



189 



Swampscott War Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 

Trustees 

Ernest Manchin, Chairman 
Mrs. Mary W. Cooper, Secretary 
Joseph J. Balsama 
Angelo M. Losano 
Philip A. Brine, Jr. 
Charles H. Popp, Jr. 

David Sherman 
Thomas B. White, Jr. 

Associate Trustees 

Paul E. Garland 

James H. Lilly 

Keith L. Jordan 
Daniel R. Santanello 

The Trustees are grateful to everyone who gave memorial gifts 
to this Memorial Fund. The sole purpose of this Fund is to provide 
some financial assistance to present and future high school graduates 
of Swampscott who continue on to higher education. 

To each donor, by your donation you have created your own 
scholarship for your donation has been placed in the perpetual capital 
of the Memorial. 

Donations for My Favorite Teacher Memorial: Lx)uise C. 
Stanley (The Stanley School was named for her); Ernest Manchin, 
Alice Durgin, Minnie Pagnotta. 

The Honor Roll of Special Memorial Scholarships: Christopher 
W. Ratley, as scholarship recipient (1965), in memory of his mother, 
Priscilla Waldo Papin. 

The Two Sisters Memorial Scholarship: In memory of Eleanor 
M. (Currie) Ludlam and A. M. Florence (Currie) Ludlam. Their 
husbands William A. Ludlam and Natale Coraine, both veterans of 
World War II and both, and others established the scholarship. All 
four were graduated from Swampscott High School. 

Wayfarers Lodge of Masons Scholarship: In memory of their 
members (see previous reports). In memory of Erland Townsend, 
Alexander Glass, G. Waldren, Herman A. Goodwin, Walter E. Stapleton, 
Theodore J. Soteris, M. A. Cherkosky, C. Cudmore, W. Eastman, Ralph 
E, Gould, Milton S. Braverman, Harold Sherman, Arthur B. Gormley. 



190 



Alphonse and Marie C. Chiancone Scholarship: Established 
by Marie C. Chiancone. 

The Honor Roll of Special Donors and Fund Raisers: Willis 
E. Doughty, Ida S. Pinto, Minnie Pagnotta, Ernest Manchin, M. Louise 
Benevento, Joseph Pinto, Ernest Manchin, Past Commander V.F.W., 
John H. Crokley, Jr., Past Commander V.F.W., Otto W. Friedman, 
Mary Manchin, Benjamin Goldberg, one of the original Trustees and 
Secretary of this Memorial, Gloria Gilman Ludlam and William 
Ludlam, Wayfarers Lodge of Masons. 

Donations Received During the Year Honored the Memory 

of: Natale Coraine, Luigi Valleriani, Erland Townsend, Alexander 
Glass, Helen McRobie, Ella Di Camillo, Edgar Beaudit, Nancy Gallo, 
Tony Conigliano, G. Waldren Blake, Herman Q. Goodwin, Walter 
Stapleton, Theodore J. Soteris, Austin D. Mosco, Past Commander 
of V.F.W., James J. Levesque, Mary Gambale, Carl Morse, Lillian 
T. Friedman, Robert P. Basco, Alice Gardner, M. A. Cherkosky, C. 
Cudmore, W. Eastman, Helen Goldberg, also for her generous 
donations. Robert C. Hunt, Ralph E. Gould, Milton S. Braverman, 
Harold Shuman, Arthur R. Gormley, Alexander Redford, Henry, 
Sarah and James Manchin. 

Five Tuition Scholarships Totaling $2600 were aw^arded as 
follows: 

$600 Jennifer E. Moyse — President George Washington 
$600 Marleigh A. Phillips — President Lincoln Scholarship — Trinity 
College 

$500 Eric J. Pinstein — Swampscott War Memorial Scholarship — 

Columbia University 
$500 Kimberlee Tarr — Swampscott War Memorial Scholarship — 

Brandeis University 
$400 Julian E. Johannesen — Swampscott War Memorial Scholarship 

— Cornell University 

To date 170 Swampscott students have been awarded scholarships 
totalling $45,300. The memorial was established by vote of Town 
meeting March 28, 1950. 

To All Donors: As this is a Perpetual Memorial, your donation 
will increase in amount and total amount of scholarships also will 
increase several meetings of the Trustees and the Subcommittee were 
held at the Public Library. The balance in the Fund as of December 
31, 1990 was $79,850.71. 



191 



Swampscott Arts Lottery Council 

The Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council was created in 1979 to 
provide funding for the arts in every municipality across the state. 
Local arts lottery councils were formed under their guidance to 
distribute funds in a way that benefits people in each unique 
community. Funds are allotted to each eligible community through 
a portion of Massachusetts Lottery ticket sales. 

This year the Swampscott Arts Lottery Council received the 
largest allotment since the program began. This was due in part to 
the large cultural interest expressed through the Arts Council, and 
in part to a one time administrative change which merged the Mass. 
Arts Lottery Program and the Mass. Council on the Arts and 
Humanities. 

The Swampscott Arts Council was pleased to distribute over $6000 
in Arts Lottery grants and another $1300 for school PASS programs. 
Funded programs included: a free concert of Mozart music, ethnic 
music, an art exhibit of local artists, a professional storyteller, a ballet 
as well as cultural programs for students, seniors and a Very Special 
Arts program. 

Arts council members were saddened by the death of member 
Rozelda Olanoff, who, like each member, made thoughtful 
contributions to the group. 

The Arts Council thanks the officials who help make this program 
work. 

Members: 

Cindy Madfis Blonder, Chair 

Maggie Gupta 

Anna Irving 

Jane MacDonald 

Esther Mulroy, Treasurer 

Agnes Raymond 

Whitney White 

Alice Jane Winston 



192 



Department of Weights and Measures 

John F. O'Hare, Inspector 

1990 Report. 

The sum of ($1335) thirteen hundred thirty-five dollars was 
collected for sealing and testing fees with the breakdown as follows: 

Scales & Balances Adjusted Sealed Not Sealed Condemned 



100-1000 lbs. 1 3 
over 10 lbs. & 

under 100 lbs. 10 47 

10 lbs. or less 3 6 

Weights 

Metric 42 

Apothecary 53 

Liquid Measuring Meters 3 113 2 

(gasoline) 

011 - Grease 4 

Other Devices 

Fabric Measuring 3 

Rope 2 

Yard Sticks 10 

Totals for Year 14 283 2 



Respectfully submitted, 
John F. O'Hare 



193 



Bargaining Agent 



Arthur J. Palleschi, Esquire 

As Collective Bargaining Agent for the greater part of the year, 
I should like to present this report of the activities of the Collective 
Bargaining Agent. 

During the past year, I, together with various members of the 
Board of Selectmen, successfully negotiated labor contracts with 
representatives of the Police, Public Works, Town Hall, and Library 
unions. 

These contracts were fair and equitable, for labor and 
management as well, in spite of these difficult financial times. 

I am particularly pleased to report, that over the past year, labor 
strife has been at a minimum and cooperation has been at a maximum. 



Town Counsel 

Arthur J. Palleschi, Esquire 

In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott, I 
am pleased to once again present to the citizens of Swampscott, the 
Annual Report of the Town Counsel; however, this year, unlike in 
years past, the Town Counsel has not been fully and unequivocally 
supported due to a number of reasons, which will go unmentioned 
in this report. Suffice it to say, that the best interests of the Town 
were compromised. 

It seems every year there are two or three celebrated cases which 
require a great deal of time, effort and expense for the law department. 

During the past year, the case of Drucas, et al vs. the Town of 
Swampscott and Grimes, et al vs. the Town of Swampscott were two 
such cases. 

The Drucas case was tried to conclusion in the Land Court and 
the Grimes case is soon due for trial following several preliminary 
hearings over the past year. 



194 



A number of complicated workmen's compensation cases as well 
as several serious personal injury ^?^ses have occupied much of the 
Town Counsel's time and effort. 

I>oral pfovernment involves a great deal of detail and so it is with 
government in Swampscott, all of which requires that Town Counsel, 

on a daily basis, research complex questions of law and render various 
formal legal opinions to board and department heads. 

This year was no exception, as Town Counsel was called upon 
to furnish no fewer than sixty-seven (67) formal legal opinions. 

In closing, I should like to thank all those who helped to make 
my task easier, and in particular, Sister Josette Parisi, the retired 
Administrative Assistant to the Board of Selectmen and to the new 
Administrative Assistant, Patricia George. 



195 



Service to Town 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, the Board of Selectmen 
expresses appreciation to the following people who gave service to 
the Town and who resigned in 1990. 

Charter Commission 
Douglas F. Allen 
Conservation Commission 
Sarah Ingalls 
Constables to Post Warrants & 
Other Similar Work 

Arlene Maguire 
Finance Committee 
Mark J. Thompson 
Gerard D. Perry 
Assistant Harbormasters 
Michael J. Gambale 
William W. Guay 
Harbor Advisory Committee 
William W. Guay 
Board of Health 
Robert W. Murphy 
Theodore A. Dushan, M.D. 
Steven H. Lefkowitz, M.D. 
Committee to Study Installation of 
Automatic Sprinklers in New 
Residential Construction 

John Doherty 
Memorial Day Committee 
Genevieve D'Agnese 
School Committee 
Henry S. Demboski 



196 



In Memoriam 

Donato Dandreo 
Foreman, Dept. of Public Works 
Died: January 1, 1990 

Edna I. Morrison 
High School Teacher 
Died: January 9, 1990 

Herman Goodwin 
Council on Aging 
Died: March 9, 1990 

Thomas J. Murtagh 
School System Employee 
Died: March 12, 1990 

Austin D. Mosco 
Dept. of Public Works 
Retired: 1972 after 31 years 
Director of Housing Authority 
Died: April 3, 1990 

Ralph N. Murray 
Chairman, School Committee — 1940's and 50's 
Died: April 12, 1990 

M. Jane Shanahan 
Swampscott School Teacher 
Secretary, Planning Board 
Died: April 20, 1990 

Robert L. McVie 
Secretary, Finance Committee 
Died: April 29, 1990 



197 



In Memoriam 

Rozelda Olanoff 
Member: Arts Council 
Died: July 5, 1990 

Phyllis Blanchette 
Member: Historical Society 
Died: July 19, 1990 

David Fried 
Building Code Board of Appeals 
Died: August 8, 1990 

Margaret Scanlon-Crickenberger 
Town Hall Employee 

Retired: 1970 
Died: August 27, 1990 

Michael J. Spencer 
High School History Teacher 
Died: September 26, 1990 

James N. Harris 
Member: Historical Society 
Former Assistant Building Inspector 
Died: December 5, 1990 

Francis J. Cassidy 
Board of Selectmen: 1964-1970 
Member: Charter Commission 
Former Member: Housing Authority and 
Recreation Commission 



198 



Important Swampscott Telephone Numbers 



EMFRGENCY NUMBERS Ambulance 595-1111 

Fire/ Rescue 592-2121 

Police 595-1111 

Civil Defense 598-5231 

For Information About: Call: 

Accounts Payable Accountant 596-8859 

Assessments Assessors 596-8858 

Bicycle Licenses Police 595-1 1 1 1 

Birth Certificates Town Clerk 596-8856 

Board of Appeals Eileen Ventresca 595-5393 

Building Permits Building Inspector 596-8864 

Burial Permits Health Department 596-8864 

Business Certificates Town Clerk 596-8856 

Cemetery Public Works 596-8863 

Census Election Commission 596-8855 

Conservation Conservation Commission 596-8853 

Death Certificates Town Clerk 596-8856 

Dog Licenses Town Clerk 596-8856 

Dogs, Lost or Found Dog Officer 596-8871 

Electrical Permits Building Department 596-8857 

Engineering Public Works 596-8860 

Fire Permits Fire Department 596-4050 

Fishing/ Hunting Licenses Town Clerk 596-8856 

Gas Permits Building Department 596-8857 

Library Public Library 596-8867 

Marriage Licenses/ Certs Town Clerk 596-8856 

Parks/ Playgrounds Public Works 596-8860 

Plumbing Permits Building Department 596-8857 

Public Housing Housing Authority 596-5516 

Recreation Recreation Commission 596-8854 

Schools School Department 596-8800 

Senior Citizen Activities Council on Aging 596-8866 

Sewers and Streets Public Works 596-8860 

Street Lighting Selectmen 596-8850 

Tax CoUections Collector 596-8856 

Tennis Permits Recreation Commission 596-8854 

Trash Collections Health Department 596-8864 

UCC Filings Town Clerk 596-8856 

Veterans Benefits Veterans Services 596-8853 

Voter Registrations Election Commission .596-8855 

Water Public Works 596-8860 

Weights and Measures Sealer of Weights/ Meas 596-5476 

Zoning Building Inspector 596-8864 



199 



Index 



A 

Accountant 5 

Appointments by Selectmen 5 

Appointments by Selectmen and Moderator 8 

Assessors, Board of 4 

B 

Bargaining Agent 5 

Blocksidge Park Field House 10 

Building Inspector 5 

C 

Civil Defense Director 5 

Clerk/Collector 4 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 4 

Committees— Appointed by Selectmen 

Affirmative Action 5 

Aging, Council on 5 

Ambulance Oversight 5 

Appeals, Zoning Board of 5 

Arts Council 6 

Bike way 6 

Building Code Board of Appeals 6 

Cable Advisory 6 

Conservation Commission 6 

Election Commissioners, Board of 6 

Fourth of July 6 

Harbor Advisory 6 

Historical Commission 6 

Installation of Automatic Sprinklers 6 

Insurance Advisory 6 

JFK Memorial Statue Fund 7 

Memorial Day 7 

Recreation Commission 7 

Safety/Security 7 

Traffic 7 

Veterans Day 7 

Vietnam Memorial 7 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund 190 



200 



Committees— Appointed by Moderator 

Capital Improvements 8 

Finance 8 

Phillips Beach Fire Station 8 

Sawtelle Property/Phillips Park Complex 8 

Constables 4 

Contributory Retirement Board 9 

Town Counsel 5 

D 

Democratic Town Committee 11 

Animal Control Officer 5 

E 

Elected Officials 4 

Election Commissioners, Board of 6 

Emergency Planning Commission 8 

F 

Fence Viewers 5 

Fire Department 122 

Forest Warden 124 

G 

Gas & Plumbing Inspector 9 

General Information 3 

Group Insurance Advisory Committee 10 

H 

Harbormaster 125 

Health, Board of 4 

Health Officer 9 

Housing Authority 4 

I 

In Memoriam 197, 198 

M 

Moderator 4 

P 

Parking Agent 143 

Personnel Board 8 

Planning Board 4 



201 



Police Department 137 

Public Works, Board of 4 

Public Works, Superintendent 9 

R 

Reports 

Accounting Department 83 

Animal Control 98 

Appeals, Board of 97 

Arts Council 192 

Assessors, Board of 99 

Bargaining Agent 194 

Blocksidge Field House Study Committee 103 

Building Inspector 102 

Cable Advisory Committee 105 

Civil Defense, Department of 106 

Town Clerk 15 

Town Collector 74 

Conservation Commission 107 

Council on Aging 108 

Town Counsel 194 

Election Commissioners, Board of 110 

Fire Department 122 

Forest Warden 124 

Fourth of July Committee 125 

Harbormaster 125 

Health, Board of 128 

Historical Commission 132 

Housing Authority 127 

Library, Trustees of Public 133 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 136 

Parking Commissioner 143 

Personnel Board 104 

Phillips Beach Fire Station Study Committee 135 

Planning Board 133 

Police Department 137 

Public Works, Department of 143 

Recreation Commission 148 

School Department 149 

Selectmen, Board of 13 

Town Treasurer 78 



202 



Traffic Study Committee 188 

Tree Warden 147 

Veterans Services, Department of 188 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund 190 

Weights and Measures 193 

Wires, Inspector of 131 

Recreation Commission 148 

Representatives, Liaisons, Designees, Coordinators 7 

Republican Town Committee 12 

Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship 9 

S 

School Committee 4 

Selectmen, Board of 4 

Service to Town 196 

Smoke, Inspector of 5 

T 

Telephone Numbers 199 

Town Meeting Members 67 

Treasurer 78 

Tree Warden 147 

Trustees of Public Library 133 

Trust Funds, Commissioners of 4 

V 

Veterans Agent 188 

W 

Warrant 23 

Weights and Measures Inspector 193 

Wire Inspector 131 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 5 



203 



I 



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